Need input on Kinetico re: chlorine injection


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Old 03-14-08, 08:55 AM
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Need input on Kinetico re: chlorine injection

I'll preface this by saying that I don't have a lot of info on hand at the moment as I'm at work.

We had a Kinetico system installed on our well supplied water about 3 months ago and have a chlorine injection system to deal with (I believe) the iron and related odor. The system has been working fine for the most part. When originally installed the injector pump was set at a 5 and the installer indicated it could be turned down in steps after about a week depending on the level of chlorination actually needed. They also initially had the chlorine removal set to bypass so that all the plumbing in the house would receive chlorination for about a week to deal with any buildup. That's all well and good and the removal system was put online as suggested.

Fast forward about a month and we had brown water on two separate instances. Placed a service call and all that was done was to move the activation valve for the chlorine pump to the water inlet side of the system as they really had no ideas as to why we'd have brown water on both cold & hot sides. Things were fine other than they had turned down the chlorine level and we had an odor problem return - so I turned it back up to where it was originally.

Forward to now and we had brown water again. The service person is saying that the issue is that there's too much chlorine in the system and that's causing the brown water. Unfortunately I didn't speak with the person and my wife doesn't know enough about the system to ask why they are saying that.

It seems obvious to me that the brown water is happening when the system regenerates but certainly can't explain what the exact mechanism would be for it to get into the normal water flow unless it's a faulty valve. I'd like any ideas prior to discussing things with the dealer as I already know they turned down the chlorine level and if we have and odor issue return then there's potentially a real problem brewing.
 
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Old 03-14-08, 01:06 PM
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Could again describe your system from well pump to service line. Thanks.

EX. sumbmersible pump, pressure tank, chlorine injector...etc.

Thanks.

What model Kinetico do youy have. What type of chlorine pump (diaphram or peristaltic). Any filters?

Thanks,
Andy Christensen, CWS-II
 
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Old 03-15-08, 06:21 AM
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It's basically set up as the following based on water flow...

Submersible well pump
Pressure tank
Sediment filter
Flow valve connected to Stenner chlorine injection pump
Retention tank
Kinetico 4060 with a '5' disk
Dechlorinator
Distribution manifold & hot water heater

The way it was explained was that if there's too much chlorine then it can cause the iron to precipitate out and result in the mixture slipping past the filters depending on the particle size. The smallest filter in the system is apparently 5 micron. While I understand that it seems like it would be happening a bit more frequently than 4 times in 3 months.

PS - not sure of our total water usage but it's just myself and my wife.
 
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Old 03-15-08, 07:05 AM
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Okay, thanks.

Now a couple more questions because I see something that I might not have recommended.

Does the 4060 have carbon or ceramic media in the top two tanks? How many gallons is the retention tank? 80? 120?

Important: What are the water issues your system is trying to solve? Why the chlorination system? Your hardness, iron, sulfur, if any, TDS.

I think, with a few adjustments, you can get it working fine.

Andy Christensen, CWS-II
 
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Old 03-16-08, 10:00 AM
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The primary issue being solved is one of sulfur odor.

The 4060 is ceramic and the retention tank is roughly 40 gallons (model #10X54) based on the size in comparison to the HW heater.

From the analysis that was done...
Hardness 20 gpg
TDS 480 ppm
Sulphur 0.2 ppm

That's all that was filled in. However based on the fact that all the toilet tanks had red sidewalls I'm guessing there was a fair amount of iron as well.

Thanks.
 
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Old 03-20-08, 09:01 AM
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In the long run, this system will fail because the order of filtration should be - filtration (ceramic media or aggregate media), chorine removal (activated carbon), then softening. The dealer reversed the chlorine removal and softening, therefore, the softening resin is being destroyed by the chlorine. That MAY be the cause of the brown water. This soon after initial instalation, the brown water could also be caused by old deposits coming off the pipes and water heater, especially since you had chlorine going into the system, potentially disturbing old iron.

With the 4060, you may want to make sure that it was built with the Kinetico chlorine resistant (blue) oring kit.
 
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Old 03-20-08, 04:11 PM
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Yes, the order was my concern as well.

There should be a test-port after the retention tank to monitor free chlorine (chlorine left after doing its job). If your free chloriner is way too high, you are using too much and it should be lessened, and vice versa if otherwise.

If your dechlorinator is a backwashingtype, then switch it to before the 4060. It can act both as a chlorine removal device as well as a sulfate particulate filter to some degree.

At 0.2 ppm sulfur, a chlorine injection systems with retention seems a bit overkill, unless bacteria, iron or other contaminants are being factored in.

There should also be a test-port after the dechlorinator to determine the carbon's lifespan.

Then the ceramic can really filter it down. Knowing your iron level will be essential. At 0.2 ppm sulfur in my area, iron levels can reach 4 or more ppm. However, when sulfur is high, iron is very low...again in my area. I never figured out the relationship but it is pretty consistent.

I agree with the o-ring configuration as well. SulfurGuards come with them stock because oxidents are used as regenerates.

Andy Christensen, CWS-II
 
 

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