What the heck is this? Could it poss work?


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Old 04-09-08, 11:49 AM
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What the heck is this? Could it poss work?

Any comments from some of the pro's out there? Not that I'm in the market, but I've been seeing more and more ad's for it on TV. Just wondering how it could possibly be as effective as they claim.

http://www.easywater.com/home.html
 
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Old 04-09-08, 01:22 PM
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Notice that they don't explain how it works. I have serious doubts as to its efficacy but I am going to send the link to a friend that has been an industrial water treatment consultant for more than twenty-five years and see if he knows about it.
 
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Old 04-09-08, 04:35 PM
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I noticed the non-explanation as well. We'll see who else may know anything about it.
 
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Old 04-10-08, 09:03 PM
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???

let me save you some time...


its not going to work!!!
now go buy a water softener.
 
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Old 04-10-08, 09:10 PM
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sorry.

sorry...i got a little ahead of myself. usually the way those things are advertised to work, you have to hook them up to your copper pipping and you have to wind a wire around your water pipes. and then hook the unit up to electricity and then it magically gets rid of hard water...then you realize you got scammed. then you go and buy water softener.

sean
 
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Old 04-10-08, 10:12 PM
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No problem Smasters......just one of those things I saw and wondered if anyone knew about. Like I said, not in the market for any type of softener att.

Still hoping for some of the water quality pro's to weigh in.
 
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Old 04-10-08, 10:21 PM
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Gunguy45,

Usually the hocus pocus water gizmos are called conditioners because to call it a softener may open them up to legal action but these guys are quite entertaining!

To "soften" water is to remove calcium (among other things like iron) from the water, NOT the pipes, and that is commonly done by one of two methods.

One method is ion exchange as done by a water softener. A water softener exchanges either sodium ions (if using NaCl) or potassium ions (if using KCl as a SALT SUBSTITUTE) for calcium (and other) ions in the hard water. That's it, no ifs, no ands, no buts, and no sales double talk. Simple chemistry and physics. Softening water is not black magic. It is physics and chemistry with a side of mechanics. No matter how hard sales people try (and want) to they can not violate the laws of physics or change the nature of chemical actions and reactions.

The other is by a filter and/or membrane technology or distillation, but no simple filter will remove calcium. You would need a reverse osmosis unit large enough to service your entire house. You would not want to pay for that big an RO nor pay for the service and routine maintenance it would require and RO water would be very aggressive in your plumbing and it would waste a lot of water.

NO magnet(ic) gizmo or electronic gizmo or "conditioner" will soften water but people waste their money on them EVERYDAY.

Check out this URL for one story http://www.nmsr.org/magnetic.htm and there are many more on the net if you Google.
 
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Old 04-11-08, 07:43 AM
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Thanks for the reply Lurker,

And let me be clear....I'm not being obtuse or anything (I can be, but not here, lol), and I'm not trying to push these products, nor do I intend to buy any type of softener or conditioner. I just have that urge to know, just like when I tore apart my birthday BB gun to find out how it works.

They don't say they remove anything, I don't think. They basically say they somehow keep the minerals from sticking to the pipes, faucets, and skin. I have a basic understanding of the standard salt and resin water softeners (Thanks largely to the guys here), and I realize they actually remove those products. I did check your link, lurker, that was better than anything I had found myself. Most of what I found was either "buy me's" or discussion sites like this one.

So, still, does anyone have any access to scientific reports or studies done? It is odd they don't have much in the way of actual reports except the basic info about the Rennai thing.

If this thread dies, I'll be ok without knowing. But if anyone has other studies or info, you can PM me If ya like.

Thanks Again
 
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Old 04-11-08, 08:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
... just like when I tore apart my birthday BB gun to find out how it works.
Nothing wrong with that as long as you don't look down the barrel before disassembly.

Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
They don't say they remove anything, I don't think. They basically say they somehow keep the minerals from sticking to the pipes, faucets, and skin.
So, if they don't remove the hardness from the water and the deposits are somehow prevented from sticking to the pipes and faucets the water is still hard, yes?

If the hard water is softened by this device and the hardness is not removed from the water and the deposits are somehow prevented from sticking to the pipes and faucets then the softener is not softening, yes?

If you agree with the previous two statements then calling the device a softener is, at least, a gross misrepresentation, yes?

Sometimes, for me, a question is so simple and an answer so obvious that scientific proof is not required... like gravity requires no proof. Just dropping the apple is proving gravity. Understanding gravity is an entirely different proposition and would require the scientific method but, for me, most of the time the bump on my head will suffice.

The conspicuous absence of any substantive scientific studies or documentation regarding "saltless softener" technology, and I use the term technology loosely, by third parties or even by proponents of "saltless softeners" is the most damning indictment of their claims I've observed.
 
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Old 04-11-08, 09:27 AM
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Makes me wonder how they can advertise these things. Like the ad's in the back of the PopSci mags....lol

I know about gravity..my wife doesn't go on the roof with more than a paintbrush anymore. I still have the scar from the clawhammer she "just set down for a second".

Thx all!
 
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Old 05-23-08, 02:45 PM
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Got my EasyWater from a plumber

I replied on another forum too, but I got my EasyWater from a plumber in Indianapolis. They talked to me about tradiational water softeners and the EasyWater. I was told upfront this was system was not a softener, it was a conditioner. I don't know what the difference is and I don't care. It works.

I had lots of hard water buildup on my showerhead and appliances and the Easywater got rid of it. I still have some water spots in the shower, but they are so easy to clean off. They told me that would be the case.

Plus my water heater has stopped popping and cracking like it had been doing. I went and drained some white stuff from the heater. Its obviously working there.

I'm not a plumber, but I got my Easywater from one and I really like it
 
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Old 05-25-08, 11:01 AM
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This article was in today's Indianapolis Star. Evidently this is a semi local company, that's why I am seeing so many TV ads. While this will probably not convert anyone's way of thinking it does explain a few things I was wondering about.

http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dl...SS05/805250364
 
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Old 05-25-08, 06:14 PM
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so what if you only want conditioning?

the only reason I want to treat my hard water is to prevent the build up on my pipes and appliances - I don't care about the calcium and other stuff in the water - it tastes fine as it is. outside of the impact on appliances-isnt hardness just an aesthetic thing?
 
 

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