Pinkish stain in toilet bowl


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Old 07-26-08, 08:27 PM
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Pinkish stain in toilet bowl

Hi,

I don't know if I should be posting this problem on the "Plumbing and Piping", "Toilets, Sinks, Showers, Tubs and Disposals", or here. I am going to try it here first.

We have acidic well water and use a PH neutralizer and water softener. I noticed if the water stays in the toilet for a few days, a pinkish stain develops in the toilet bowl on and below the waterline. My husband thinks this is caused by the toilet flapper. Our PH (after treatment) is OK (not great). Is this a sign that our PH neutralizer is not working and acid is eating our pipes? What can we do to prevent this?

Thanks.
 
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Old 07-27-08, 09:29 AM
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What is the pH before water goes into your equipment and what is the pH after?

What is the water softener for? Iron?

Have you had your water tested by a certified lab? What are the results?

What is in the neutralizer? Calcite? What size tank and when was it filled? Has the level dropped in the tank?
 
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Old 07-27-08, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Novice134 View Post
Hi,

I don't know if I should be posting this problem on the "Plumbing and Piping", "Toilets, Sinks, Showers, Tubs and Disposals", or here. I am going to try it here first.

We have acidic well water and use a PH neutralizer and water softener. I noticed if the water stays in the toilet for a few days, a pinkish stain develops in the toilet bowl on and below the waterline. My husband thinks this is caused by the toilet flapper. Our PH (after treatment) is OK (not great). Is this a sign that our PH neutralizer is not working and acid is eating our pipes? What can we do to prevent this?

Thanks.

Do you have copper lines? What is "not great pH"? I would say you have iron coming through, but without more details, it is impossible to say.

pH affectations to water on copper plumbing is usually and bluish-green residue and pin-hole leaks will develope.

Andy Christensen, CWS-II
 
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Old 07-29-08, 12:20 AM
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pink at the waterline

This pink buildup is usually caused by bacterial contamination. It is most frequently seen in toilets and showers - These are areas where airborne bacteria, mold and fungi are often found in high concentrations.

Scrub it off and use a disinfectant (chlorine or bromine tablet)in yout toilet tank. The problem will most likely disappear and not return.

It is also quite possible that your softener could be colonized by HPC bacteria that is further compounding the issue. It wouldn't hurt to disinfect your softener either.


Good Luck !

Greg Reyneke CWS-VI
 
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Old 07-29-08, 06:08 PM
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how do you disinfect the softener? doesn't that get the chlorine, etc into the drinking water?
 
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Old 07-29-08, 06:21 PM
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Depending on the size and type of softener, drop a cup of bleach in the brine tank and manually regenerate. The chlorine will backwash out so there will be virtually none coming into your drinking or service water.

Andy Christensen, CWS-II
 
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Old 07-29-08, 06:25 PM
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Disinfecting a softener

Proper disinfection protocol will not allow any residual disinfectant or byproducts into your home.

Andy's advice is right on the money.


Look at the following link for some further guidelines:-

http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/wellsdisinfect.asp


Greg Reyneke CWS-VI
 
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Old 07-29-08, 07:17 PM
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Just a little background. I have been trying to be environmentally friendly. So, I have stopped using chlorine to clean the toilet. What I do is the night before, I dump in 1/2 to 3/4 cup of 20-Mule borax into the toilet bowl water, sprinkle the side of the bowl with baking soda, then spray the toilet seat, cover, inside and outside of the bowl with a mixture of vinegar/water/drops of essential oil (anything from tea tree oil to eucalyptus oil). I let all this sit overnight. The next day, I use a toilet brush to clean the inside of the bowl. Then, I spray more vinegar/water/oil combo on the outside of the bowl, seat, surrounding area, etc and wipe down. I guess from what you are saying, this method is not killing the bacteria and I have to use chloride occasionally. Is chloride the only thing I can use?
 
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Old 07-29-08, 10:25 PM
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Environmentally friendly disinfection

Kudos to you for being conscious about your net environmental impact.

Chlorine bleach (sodium hypochlorite) actually has a minimal environental impact when used in an application like this.

Bleach will break down rapidly into salt, oxygen & water after the chlorine itself is inactivated in the disinfection process where it meets large amounts of organic matter, and then other organic matter in your septic system.

No intact chlorine molecules should really reach the external environment. Just remember not to drink the bleach or breath the fumes.


When cleaning the pink build-up at the toilet level, remember to use a biodegradable surfactant/soap and SCRUB to breakdown the HPC biofilm so that the bleach can do its job.
 
 

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