high iron level


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Old 10-01-08, 04:35 PM
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high iron level

We will be moving into a new house with a newly drilled well. The well is 440'.

We just got test results back on the water. The results are:

Coliform...absent
E. Coli...absent
Nitrate/nitrogen...<1.0
Iron...2.1 mg/l
Chloride...14 mg/l
pH...7.49
hardness...84 mg/l

I am concerned about the iron level and staining of plumbing fixtures and laundry as well.

I have been looking at softeners online...and reading quite a bit about them too.

I am considering a Fleck 5600, but I'm not sure how big to get.

Our house has 2.5 baths, laundry, and dishwasher. There are only two adults in the house.

Any advice would greatly appreciated.Beer 4U2

Thanks
 
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Old 10-02-08, 09:13 AM
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Your water analysis data is not 'balanced', you have very little hardness for the pH etc. The iron would be hard to live with. Who did the tests and how old was the sample?

If you like the 5600, you'd love the Clack WS-1, a DIYer's dream. The guy that invented the 5600, along with two other ex Fleck engineers, invented the Clack WS-1 and improved the piston seals and spacers design making it the easiest to program and repair with much less expensive parts. No special tools required. Feature wise, the 5600 can't compare to the Clack WS-1; soft water brine refill, both metered/demand based immediate and delayed regeneration with calendar override, all programming held in NOVRAM so it isn't lost if the power fails, extensive history and troubling shooting like the max gpm each of the last 6 days and the max ever run through it. The last 63 days of water usage per day. Variable reserve so no subtracting a days worth of capacity. The ability to set the length of time for each cycle position of a regeneration etc. etc. etc..

As to sizing... you need to size its constant SFR gpm (service flow rating) based on the family size and the number of bathrooms and type of fixtures (your peak demand gpm) or it won't be capable of removing all the hardness and iron all the time. That is not the SFR stated as xx gpm @ 15 psi; that's the max gpm if you suffer a 15 psi pressure drop across the softener.
 
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Old 10-02-08, 09:43 AM
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An independant lab did the testing, and the sample was taken the same day they did the testing.

Would a birm iron filter be a better solution? I'd rather not soften the water if I don't need to.

Thanks
 
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Old 10-02-08, 10:03 AM
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BIRM is used on water that has less than 5ppm iron. There can not be any h2s or oil present.
 
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Old 10-02-08, 10:37 AM
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There was no mention of H2S or oils on the lab results....does that mean I can use a birm filter...or do I need more testing?
 
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Old 10-02-08, 12:26 PM
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Based on the test yes. If you don't smell any h2s, again yes. The BIRM system works well and does not require a regenerant. No salt to lug. A hardness of 84mg/l equals 5 grains per gallon or almost the amount of the iron. For every part of iron, you add 3 GPG. So 2.1 iron would be 6.3 GPG hardness. Take away the iron and what hardness do you have left? Not much and this is why I recommended the BIRM. The hardness is not a factor here. You save money for a BIRM filter over a softener and the maintenance is reduced.

Churlish mentioned no "specials tools" with the clack. They dohave a special tool even though you can use a set of plies and screwdriver to disassemble it. I don't recommend it because it tears up the plastic and looks tacky.
 
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Old 10-02-08, 01:00 PM
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Thanks so much for the help. A BIRM system would be cheaper, and easier to install for me as well.
 
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Old 10-02-08, 01:18 PM
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RedHouse, I sent you a private message.
 
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Old 10-03-08, 02:01 AM
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Originally Posted by RedHouse View Post
Thanks so much for the help. A BIRM system would be cheaper, and easier to install for me as well.
I am not trying to sell anything here 'cause I'm in Vietnam.

Why don't you try FiloxR? It is said 7500 times stronger than Birm. (http://www.thietbiloc.com/en/media-a...ges/filox.html)

I've just install for my client with 40 ppm of iron, 1,04 ppm of Manganese and it works.
 
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Old 10-03-08, 09:11 AM
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I've never used Filox. The problem I see is the fact that the weight would be a factor. At 114 pounds per cubic foot you must have 12-15 gpm flow rate to properly backwash it. Some households may not have that much flow rate. Pyrolox has the same density and i've seen it pack so tight it becomes useless.
With BIRM the weight is only 44 pounds and the BW flow rate is 4 gpm. So a proper cleaning is done every time it backwashes.
 
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Old 10-03-08, 10:26 AM
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I'd retest the pH, on site, and, use a buffer for iron so the iron does not produce a falsely high pH result. Birm and low pH doesn't work well together.
 
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Old 10-03-08, 11:20 AM
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What about a mixture of 25% Filox and 75% Birm?

Might they be compatible?
 
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Old 10-03-08, 12:35 PM
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It sounds like it would work, but why take the chance. The BIRM will handle up to 5ppm iron. Here the water tests at 2ppm. I advise based on personal experiences and not what a company says their product will do. I'm not into trial and error. I guess that's why I'm so reluctant to use a clack valve.
 
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Old 10-03-08, 01:03 PM
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Originally Posted by biermech View Post
I advise based on personal experiences and not what a company says their product will do. I'm not into trial and error. I guess that's why I'm so reluctant to use a clack valve.
Keep up the good work.

IIRC, Filox is more expensive too.
 
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Old 10-17-08, 03:30 PM
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You have pretty much the same problem we have (had) 3.5 years ago. Fairly new construction with a 403 ft. well. We already had a Rainsoft softener that worked fine that we had in our older home and had it transferred, but discovered we had ferrous iron that fluctuated depending on rainfall, water use, etc. Well the Rainsoft guy came out and tested the water. On that day the iron hit 3ppm, along with a PH of 5.8 and a hardness of only 3 grains. When we first looked at the home we wondered why it hadn't sold and then took a look at the tubs, sinks, etc. and knew why. Coming from a wastewater background I knew the water could be treated with the right system because the property was too nice to pass up.

Anyway, we were given 2 options. A system consisting of an iron filter and some sort of green sand filter (I believe that's the name) that would neutralize the PH. But he told us that system had limitations and would have to be rebedded every 3 or so years depending on how often it cycled. The other option was a chemical injection system which was the better way for us because the iron fluctuates. I have used the water for a few hours pretty much constantly and it stirred the well up so much I'd say the level easily hit 20ppm or more that day. The injection system consists of 2 tanks and pumps, one that contains alum for the iron removal and the other for caustic soda and bleach for PH neutralization, disinfection and oxidation. After the water goes to a 120 gallon retention tank it is filtered through a large carbon filter called a Hysulex, then through the softener, then through a high capacity whole house filter. What we end up with looks and tastes better than anything I've had from anyone's house or anything we've bought. The beauty of this system is that I can alter the chemicals to keep up with the fluctuating iron levels. They do stay stable maybe 80% of the year, but anytime we get alot of rain or use too much water daily it can stir things up a bit. There is the cost of the chemicals, but it's no more than we were paying monthly for a city water bill in the past. And the chemicals are food grade.

The story behind the iron fluctuation is simple. Our land has alot of iron in the ground. Anywhere you dig you get clumps of ferrous iron. We were told that when we use more water than the well can recover from at one time it drops the level down a bit or when it rains alot it raises the static level, either situation causes the water to move in/out of iron pockets down deep and that stirs it up. In the near future we are going to have a video inspection done and may possibly have it lined top to bottom if possible. Later!
 
 

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