Lost Resin Culligan Mark 100 Water Softener


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Old 10-20-08, 09:37 AM
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Lost Resin Culligan Mark 100 Water Softener

I bought a 1998 Culligan Mark 100 water softener. While transporting it home I lost 9 inches of resin out of the 36 inch mineral tank. I was given 2 new bags of resin(rust brown in color). I have taken the contol valve off and looked into tank. 1) Could I just add a small amount of water and than add the resin into the tank to bring level up to original level? 2) do you know how much of a measured amount of resin the tank holds? I thought I could turn tank upside down, drain tank and start over with a measured amount of resin and add water. I would appreciate any help with this problem.
 
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Old 10-20-08, 10:15 AM
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What is the diameter of the tank (9" 10")? If you have a new bag of resin, is it 1 cubic foot? A 9" tank will hold 1 cuft. I would suggest empting the tank and put 1 bag in. Don't mix old with new if you can avoid it. The resin level should be about 2/3 the tank. So if the tank height is 48", then the resin height should be about 32" (2/3).
 
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Old 10-20-08, 10:32 AM
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Roger, are you sure it has a 36" (high) mineral tank?

For Culligan, that is an odd size. See if there is a label on the tank with a model number like 0735 or 735, 844, 948 etc... If say 735, the tank is a 7" x 35" and means you have a 1/4 cuft softener. That is very small and probably have to regenerate very frequently for even a 2 member family with only one bathroom. And... if you run more than about 3 gpm through it, it can't get 100% of the hardness and iron out of your water.
 
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Old 10-20-08, 07:08 PM
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The dia is 8 inches and I measured from the floor (including black ring at bottom) it is 42inches to curved part of tank. On the back of the controls I saw I saw Model # 01007347 & serial # 1132384. It also has a data plate that says Culligan Mark 100 9" Soft-Minder. It has a sticker on the tank and the number on it is s/n s973082. Thanks Biermech & Churlish for your help. I appreciate it!
 
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Old 10-20-08, 10:01 PM
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Then you have a 9" diameter tank and measured up to the bottom of the tank would probably make it a 48" tall and that usually would make your softener a 1.0 cuft IF you have a polyglass tank.
 
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Old 10-21-08, 07:01 AM
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If it's a 8" tank, then you only need 3/4 cuft of resin. Is it a steel tank? If you can not tell if it's an 8" or 9" tank, go by the height when adding resin. Remember, it should come up about 2/3 the tank.
 
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Old 10-21-08, 07:29 PM
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It is a 9 inch polyglass tank. The tank measures 44 inches to were the control head fastens to tank. It measures 48 inches to center line of the controls. I never thought about this not being big enough. There is just the 2 of us with guests sometimes. Will this unit be big enough? I have another question. Will a floor drain handle the discharge or should I install it to a house drain? Thanks again both of you for your help!!
 
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Old 10-22-08, 09:36 AM
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You measure a tank from the floor to the top of the tank where the control valve screws into the neck of the tank or is clamped on the tank. If it measures 44" it is a nonstandard size for a 1.0 cuft.

Softeners come in various sizes and sizing depends on how many K of capacity is needed at a good salt dose efficiency. The K of capacity depends on how many family members and the hardness, iron and manganese content in the water. Then there is the constant service flow rate (SFR) of the softener that is dictated by the peak demand flow rate of the house based on the number of bathrooms and the type of fixtures in them and how, and how frequently, you use them, if at all. The SFR is dictated by the volume of resin in the softener. A 1.0 cuft has a 9 gpm constant SFR.

You can use a floor drain if you test it to make sure it can accept say 50 gallons of water at about 3 gpm. Or you can use the main sewer or other drain lines in the house, like a washing machine stand pipe or utility sink. Or in some cases a sump pump.
 
 

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