Replacing Culligan Softener, Bypass Valve Connection Issue


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Old 11-23-08, 01:36 AM
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Replacing Culligan Softener, Bypass Valve Connection Issue

My first post, please be gentle.

I just bought a house where the previous owners had been leasing a Culligan softener. I decided to buy one (Kenmore 350) instead of continuing the lease on the Culligan.

The new softener included a bypass valve and and 1" male threaded quick disconnect fittings that can be connected with or without the bypass valve.

The Culligan guy left behind a bypass valve that was apparently installed by Culligan, and from my searches they seem to call it the Cul-Flo-Valv (it looks like this (but is missing the plastic fittings): Watts: Divertaflo 343314 Series | Bronze Culligan® Style B By-pass Valves). I've tried to get a hold of Culligan to get the parts to connect to it or a quote on connecting my new one, and I've entered an endless stream of unreturned phone calls.

Does anyone know where I could find the fittings to connect to the Culligan valve, or would you guys recommend cutting it off and using the bypass valve that came with the new softener?

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 11-23-08, 07:16 AM
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Start fresh. Cut out the old bypass. Do you have PVC or copper?
 
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Old 11-23-08, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by biermech View Post
Start fresh. Cut out the old bypass. Do you have PVC or copper?
I have copper into the house, the included bypass valve with the new softener is pvc.

I can post pictures later, but the new bypass has a 1" threaded pipe pointing up and the copper coming from the wall is pointing down once I cut off the old valve. Without the new bypass valve the pipe comes to about 1 foot above the new softener's height.

I've never sweat copper before and I haven't researched how difficult it is. I've heard of Shark Bite (i think that was the name of it) that allows you to connect without a torch. Any recommendations on how to connect?
 
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Old 11-23-08, 07:25 PM
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It's not hard to sweat copper. If you don't have the tools, I'ld go with the shark bite. I've never used them but hear they work well. With the new bypass, it is 1" male thread. Putting a 1" female PVC on it, you run the risk it the female PVC cracking. Use a 1" threaded nipple. It will turn it into 1" female so you can use 1" PVC male adapter. Let me know if you want to soldier copper. It's not hard and you can learn in a few minutes.
 
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Old 11-24-08, 12:37 AM
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It sounds like I should use the SharkBite. I don't have the tools to solder the copper which seems like it would drive the cost up pretty quickly when I will probably only use the stuff once.

I planned out a connection that I think will be ideal and wanted to see what you think. I tried to find all the parts on HomeDepot's website so I think I can pull this off. I was thinking that I would use the SharkBite once at the house pipes and use fittings to accomplish the rest. Here is a rough diagram of what I was thinking http://dl.getdropbox.com/u/111516/diagram.JPG

The only part I couldn't find on Home Depot's website is the PVC 3/4" F to 1" F. I gathered from your previous post that it would be a good idea to have something disposable that can connect directly to the new bypass in case it cracks when I tighten the fittings onto it.

The other configuration I was considering was a straight SharkBite connected to the house, and a copper tube following down to the softener. Ending with a SharkBite connection that will expand to 1" female. Something like this: http://dl.getdropbox.com/u/111516/diagram2.JPG

I'm having trouble deciding because the second option has 3 possible failure points from the SharkBite where as the first option has more fittings and only one SharkBite.

Thanks again for your help.
 
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Old 11-24-08, 01:26 AM
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tip --- use braided vinyl tubing

If it were me doing this (for the first time) I'd try to keep it simple. I'd cut the copper, install 1" threaded sharkbite nipples then screw on some 1" plastic barbed fittings, do the same at the water softener. The get some of that clear braided vinyl tubing (looks like this Clear Vinyl Tubing)from Home Depot and clamp it on tightly and turn everything on. That way you don't have to worry about cutting, glueing and aligning everything perfectly since the vinyl tubing is flexible, won't break and good for 100psi.
 
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Old 11-24-08, 06:03 AM
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In the 1st pic you're showing 2 shark bites that are female threaded. Then a brass nipple that connects to female PVC. When possible, stay away from female PVC. Screw male PVC adaptors straight into the female shark bite. On the bypass side, get 2 1" threaded union. It converts the male thread on the bypass to a female thread. Now you can use 1" male pvc adaptors and a 1" x 3/4" reducer bushing.
 
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Old 11-30-08, 02:52 PM
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I just finished it a few nights ago and everything is working great. I went with copper all the way to the pvc at the softener and used shark bites to connect the copper.

Thanks again.
 
 

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