Another Person Confused about Water Softeners/Conditioners


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Old 09-21-09, 07:17 AM
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Another Person Confused about Water Softeners/Conditioners

I've read some of the threads on here, and I'm still a little confused. We have a well with hard water that we know we need treated. We've had two companies come out, Culligan and Hague, to give us their sales pitches. We also have some iron in our water, 1 ppm based on the Culligan test.

Both the Culligan and Hague systems have the resin beds in them that are supposed to be required to remove things like iron and other impurities. The Culligan system is ~$2000 and the Hague system is ~$6500. Just as a disclaimer, I did research on Hague, and they're nothing but a bunch of lying, high pressure sales people that use scare tactics to sell their product. So needless to say, we're not going with them.

The main question I have is: Do we really need a higher priced system that has these resin beds in them that are supposed to be required to treat conditions like iron and other impurities, or will any standard water softener do the job? I'm not asking for anyone's opinion on whether or not to buy a Sears unit because it has a one year warranty and will break down in one year and one month. Or that the Hague has a lifetime warranty and you get free soap, etc. I just want to know if the resin bed system is required to treat problems like iron, etc.

If a resin bed system is not required and a standard water softener will do the job, why would I pay ~$2000 for a Culligan system? This is actually a rhetorical question that I don't expect anyone to answer.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Scott
 
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Old 09-21-09, 07:38 AM
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You need a water test from a certified independent lab, not from the salesmen.

Depending on the type of iron and concentration, a resin bed may or may not work.
 
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Old 09-21-09, 08:16 AM
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We've actually had our water tested by the county several times, so I know the numbers he told us are good. What do you mean by "the type of iron"? Iron is a basic element, what "kinds" are there?
 
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Old 09-21-09, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by sday88 View Post
We've actually had our water tested by the county several times, so I know the numbers he told us are good. What do you mean by "the type of iron"? Iron is a basic element, what "kinds" are there?

What are your test results?

First of all a softener HAS a resin bed. It seems like you are drawing a difference there. Secondly, you can't ask: I just want to know if the resin bed system is required to treat problems like iron, etc. It's the "etc.", that is needed to be known and understood.

For iron alone, there are numerous methods; some use chemicals, others do not. There are four basic irons: ferric, ferrous, bacterial and colloidal. Each has its own particular hurdles and solutions. Occasionally, more than one can be hadled by the same equipment.

Obviously the Hague offered a lot more equipment-wse than Culligan. Did Culligan offer a Medalist, Silver or Platinum series? Did Hague offer an RO, iro filter? Now, I am not defending Hague or challenging you on your findings, but no one can stay in business if that were true to an absolute. maybe a particular dealer has had issues.

What did they tell you about the "lifetime" aspect of their warranty? And how does that compare with Culligan's?

I could go on because the devil is in the details. As far as the "county test" they say your water is fine if it doesn't kill you. That's their job. They have absolutely no concerns if you plumbing rots, your hair turns red, stalagmites hang from the shower and your clothes disintegrate after three washings, because that is not their job. It's like your tire guy says your car is fine but you know your transmission has no first, second or third gear.

Andy
 
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Old 09-21-09, 05:37 PM
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Like I said in my original post, the iron is 1 ppm. Well, if a plain softener has a resin bed, then there's no difference and there's no reason to spend thousands of dollars on a Culligan or Hague. And iron is iron. It's a basic element, Fe, on the periodic table of elements.

Hague did not offer "a lot" more than the Culligan. The only thing additional with the Hague was the RO system. A horrendous waste in my opinion. Their system apparently cleans the water almost to perfection, so what's the point in adding the RO system to my sink to refine it even more? The Culligan is the Gold Series.

I'm not debating the quality of the Hague system in the least. I'm sure it may very well be the best in the business. But don't come to my house and spout lies and scare tactics and not even really talk about your product just to sell me something the is severely overpriced.

Once again, I don't care about the warranty aspects, I was just asking specifically about what I wanted to know about the resin beds, nothing more.

I'm not really sure why you're going on about my county health department. All I said was that we had our water checked by them several times and the results were similar to what Culligan told us. I KNOW we have bad water, that's why we're trying to fix it.

Based on your last paragraph, you sound remarkably like the Hague guy that came here. Do you also sell them?
 
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Old 09-21-09, 07:52 PM
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There are three basic types of resin used in softeners:
1. Standard Resin (lowest cost)
2. Fine Mesh Resin (higher cost)
3. A proprietary and unique resin--SST-60 (highest cost)

If your only water problems are hardness and 1 ppm iron then any of the resin types should work.

If you don't want to use standard resin I recomment SST-60.
SST-60 resin offers superior performance, particularly with iron, but is not necessary for your level of iron.

However, if you have other water problems you haven't posted there may be other resin types that could be necessary--that is why other posters are asking you test results.
 
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Old 09-21-09, 08:20 PM
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Gee Scott, it sounds like you know all the answers to all the questions you are already asking. If you don't like the responses then why bother posting a question?

I would appreciate the responses and take them with due regard.

I have a post "Orange Water and Smells" and I can't even get a response from the experts on here. I am the truly the one who is confused and knows nothing about water softeners and conditioners.
 
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Old 09-22-09, 05:31 AM
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No, mhayen, I don't know all the answers. I asked one question in particular and didn't want all the fluff in relation to it. If you really want an answer, call in a Hague rep and have him lie and scare you into a $6500 system.

Bob999, you sort of answered my question. The other water problems that I may or may not have, to be honest, I don't really care. I know I have hard water, I want to treat that. I know I have iron, I want to treat that. Other than that, I'm not too concerned with what else is in there.

Once again, basically my question just comes down to: Do I need a system like the Culligan Gold Series, or would a much less expensive standard softener from somewhere like Lowes or Sears do the trick?
 
 

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