What is a Turbulator, and do I need one


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Old 11-10-09, 05:25 PM
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What is a Turbulator, and do I need one

I have well water (location = central NJ, 4mi from shore). We have a problem with iron stains on sinks etc. I heard of something called a "turbulator" but not certain if it is good idea?

I currently have a 20 year old Culligan water softener. Which I think I should probably replace (it is noisey during cycles).

I have also read on this forum about Iron Filters. What are they? Are they worthwhile? What are the best brands?

Thanks!!!
 
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Old 11-10-09, 05:50 PM
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Before we can give you an opinion worth more than a can of coke, we need to know the details of the water. As always the best place to start is having the water tested for at LEAST iron, hardness and pH. Once you have the results of the testing I along with others will be happy to give you an opinion on what you may or may not need.

As for a turbulator I know I never use them. The difference on the units I have seen or used them on seemed to be so minimal that it didn't warrant the added cost to install them.

That is just my opinion but maybe someone else has positive experiences with them.
 
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Old 11-10-09, 05:53 PM
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http://www.clementswater.com/mainpro...turbulator.pdf

These are used to bring resins up from the bottom during backwashing. Many companies that sold these stopped after a while due to service problems. Those who keep selling them are usually on-line dealers who don't have to service them.

I have removed a few that were clogged up and caused poor backwashing

If your softener has good water flow/pressure, and properly set up, then I don't thing they are needed. High iron applications may need a bigger softener, more frequent regeneration, and/or higher salt dosage.

For high iron, a twin tank softener will solve many of those problems.

Andy Christensen, CWS-II
 
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Old 11-11-09, 04:17 PM
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OK, I'll see about testing the water.

You said a double tank set up would be good, but are there specific filters/softeners that are for high iron content????
 
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Old 11-13-09, 04:08 PM
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Yes there are systems that work great for high iron, but it depends on what the actual iron content and pH are. For instance I have had customers tell me they had high iron when in fact the actual reading was 2 PPM. While 2 PPM will stain badly it really isn't "high" iron. Get an actual iron test done and we can give you advice.

A twin tank unit will help slightly in removing iron and improving efficiency but is usually considerably more money and often times not worth the initial investment. As someone in the industry who sells equipment I can tell you my profit margin is higher on twin tank units as is my total profit but I rarely sell them because once you explain to people the difference between a single and double tank system, they understand that profit is the reason so many companies sell them.

Unless you NEED soft water 24/7/365 then usually a twin tank unit is a waste of your money. Restaurants use them because they need soft water all the time. They have a specific purpose and are quality units but generally are more than a residential home will need. If you don't mind paying the substantial extra money then by all means look into a twin tank unit.
 
 

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