Opinions on Aquasana and Pelican whole house filters

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  #1  
Old 02-22-11, 04:03 PM
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Opinions on Aquasana and Pelican whole house filters

Hello,

Curious to know if anyone has any experience/opinions of/with either of these brands?

I'm interested in getting a whole house system. However, after much internet research I have found myself to be frustrated.

It seems as if the water softening and/or purification industry is all over the place with claims as to what is the best solution, with no clear consensus coming forward. For every "best solution" claim from a company there are 10 refutes.

Also, there are many individuals passionately/heatedly expressing their particular viewpoints as to the best solution with a rebuttal by someone else.

salt vs no salt - softening
no softening at all - hard water is fine
remove everything vs leave the minerals
RO vs carbon filter
whole house vs point of
upflow vs downflow
city water fine to bathe in vs city water is poison
etc. vs etc.

AAHHHH!

So, apparently and unfortunately there is no clear consensus, so what else can I do but to ask for more opinions?

OK, here's the facts:
I'm on city water. I haven't had my water tested. I haven't tried to find public city water test records.

All I know is that I don't trust the water. We get our water from a highly polluted river here in indianapolis. Industry lines this river. Finally, my water is decently hard producing scale around the house.

Thanks for any suggestions
 
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  #2  
Old 02-22-11, 04:29 PM
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My opinion is based on my experiences on installs and horror stories. I have heard it all and saw many test reports from many water sources.

City water is good. They are under EPA guidelines. The only issue for drinking purposes would be the chlorine. I would do a point of use carbon filter. Use this for drinking.

A ro system filters better and has carbon filters to protect the membrane so you get the best of both worlds. Adding uv light gets even better protection against bacteria but I would say you only need a point of use carbon filter.

As far as your scale in the house goes a salt based softner would be a good option. Takes out some iron also.

You will get many opinions here. I am only going from your post and what you describe there that your concerns might be.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 02-22-11, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by mrbobloblaw View Post
Hello,

Curious to know if anyone has any experience/opinions of/with either of these brands?

I'm interested in getting a whole house system. However, after much internet research I have found myself to be frustrated.

It seems as if the water softening and/or purification industry is all over the place with claims as to what is the best solution, with no clear consensus coming forward. For every "best solution" claim from a company there are 10 refutes.

Also, there are many individuals passionately/heatedly expressing their particular viewpoints as to the best solution with a rebuttal by someone else.

salt vs no salt - softening
no softening at all - hard water is fine
remove everything vs leave the minerals
RO vs carbon filter
whole house vs point of
upflow vs downflow
city water fine to bathe in vs city water is poison
etc. vs etc.

AAHHHH!

So, apparently and unfortunately there is no clear consensus, so what else can I do but to ask for more opinions?

OK, here's the facts:
I'm on city water. I haven't had my water tested. I haven't tried to find public city water test records.

All I know is that I don't trust the water. We get our water from a highly polluted river here in indianapolis. Industry lines this river. Finally, my water is decently hard producing scale around the house.

Thanks for any suggestions
I am on well water but if i wanted to get good clean water than i would only go one way,
purification system. You don;t want to just soften the water,or filter out a few things.
a purification system, if you have a good co they will test your water and charge the tank so it, will take out all pollutions. Paul
 
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Old 02-22-11, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by mrbobloblaw View Post
Curious to know if anyone has any experience/opinions of/with either of these brands?

So, apparently and unfortunately there is no clear consensus, so what else can I do but to ask for more opinions?

OK, here's the facts:
I'm on city water. I haven't had my water tested. I haven't tried to find public city water test records.

All I know is that I don't trust the water. We get our water from a highly polluted river here in indianapolis. Industry lines this river. Finally, my water is decently hard producing scale around the house.

Thanks for any suggestions
As you note there are lots of opinions. I suggest you do some more research to get facts and then form your own opinion.

I will offer what I think are some relevant facts:
1. Chlorinated municipal water supplies are bacteriologically safe--the chlorine kills organisms that cause disease.
2. There are some byproducts from chlorination but public health authorities say they are safe. I believe them.
3. Hardness is not a health issue. Removal of hardness can improve quality of life (as defined by most people, including me).

I will also offer my opinion--don't be swayed by brands. Focus on what you want to do to your water to "improve" it and then research the best (I define that from a reliability and cost standpoint) way to achieve your objectives.
 
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Old 02-22-11, 07:37 PM
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Why is it that the systems that you are talking about are only on the web and no store down the street?
 
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Old 02-22-11, 08:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Akpsdvan View Post
Why is it that the systems that you are talking about are only on the web and no store down the street?
Yes and when you read the sites that say they are #1 its just a link to the makers of these.

Take this link. Wow pelican is #1

Compare Home Water Filters

Now go to the about us page of this site.

Compare Home Water Filters

This website is provided to you courtesy of Enviro Water Solutions, which also does business as WaterFilter USA, the distributor of the Pelican™ Carbon Filter, one of the water filters mentioned in this web site.

How IRONIC.....no pun intended...LOL

Mike NJ
 
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Old 02-23-11, 07:15 AM
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A water softener is defined as an appliance that removes dissolved mineral contents in the water and delivers soft water which is deemed as water that is >1gpg of hardness.
The systems you mention are not water softeners by any definition. They may be considered a type of water conditioner as they create a crystalline structure of the mineral content but do not remove hardness minerals.
Water with low hardness, up to 10gpg with no iron, may be a matter of choice to soften or not. The higher the hardness the more readily the water creates problems in the home. Even trace amounts of hardness will leave mineral deposits though. A water softener with up-flow regeneration can be more efficient.

Once the chlorinated water supply has reached the home it has done what it was intended to do and is no longer needed. The best option at this point is to have a point of entry carbon tank for removal of chlorine for whole house. Up-flow or down-flow does not matter as the carbon will need to be replaced at some point and neither will prolong this.

The concerns about your drinking water can be alleviated with a Reverse Osmosis System that has a VOC (volatile organic chemicals) filter as an integral part of the system. This can be used for drinking and cooking as well as tied into the refrigerator with the proper sized storage tank.
I would have to agree, do not be swayed by brands. Value is the objective (reliability, serviceability, warranty, longevity, company reputation and price) is what needs to be considered.

I would recommend a thorough water analysis. This can be done by a third party water testing lab or reputable water treatment professional. You can go to WQA, water quality, NSF certified, certification, filtration, contamination, lead, reverse osmosis, RO, softening for a list of certified water treatment professionals in your area. I would also suggest going on-line to get the water report for your city, these come out yearly.

It's a shame for consumers there is so much confusion brought on by the industry but that is also a sign of the information age. How does all this get sorted out? Trust your instincts and trust the person you feel most confident in.
I wish you good luck, good water and good health,
RJ
 
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Old 02-23-11, 02:11 PM
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Originally Posted by RJh2o View Post
A water softener is defined as an appliance that removes dissolved mineral contents in the water and delivers soft water which is deemed as water that is >1gpg of hardness.
I think what RJ meant to say is that a water softener exchanges hardness ions for sodium ions and a properly operating softener will deliver water with hardness ions of less than 1 grain per gallon.
 
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Old 12-05-11, 10:53 AM
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Aquasana has engaged in activities that raise questions with me.

I don't know how well Aquasana filters work but I do know that they have bought up every available domain name regarding filtering, which is what fly by night diet pill manufacturers do. Why? This is no way to build confidence, but perhaps they aren't concerned with that. I have a whole house filter that consists of 3 20" filters, but it doesn't filter out flouride and cholormines so I went to water.org which is where I got information years ago only to find it is now a front for aquasana, I wonder how much they paid for that one.
 
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