Need whole house water filtration for well water

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Old 12-28-11, 08:19 PM
J
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Need whole house water filtration for well water

We have well water that has a lot of iron and is high acid (toilets go brown (less since new well) and copper pipes leach blue/green). Located in an area that has some farming so also concerned about chemicals. Also, no public sewer system. People have individual septic tanks so concerned about coliform contamination. Water tastes very good, no smells. Don't want a system that requires salt or alot of chemicals. Want as compact a system as possible. Your suggestions would be appreciated.
 
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Old 12-28-11, 08:46 PM
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It sounds like you have a complex water problem and there will be a variety of solutions. You should bring your water to a local lab and have it tested. They generally offer diffrent groups of tests that you can get at a reduced cost. Then contact a couple of local reputable dealers and compare their findings and recomendations.
 
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Old 12-28-11, 09:48 PM
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The first step is to have the water tested by a reputable lab to identify the contaminants that need to be treated as well as the level of the contaminants.

Acid water can be treated in one of two ways-1.injection of soda ash or pot ash depending on the pH, or 2. An acid neutralizing filter with calcite or a mix of calcite and corosex depending on the pH.

Injection doesn't raise the hardness of the water but requires a lot of tending and maintenance compared to acid neutralizing filters. Acid Neutralizing filters raise hardness and are low maintenance.

There are a number of treatment methods for iron but some require fairly specific water conditions to work correctly so a water analysis is very important. One fairly robust method is chlorine injection followed by a retention tank followed by a carbon filter to remove the excess chlorine. This system will also deal with coliform bacteria and iron bacteria if present.

Post again when you have test results.
 
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Old 12-30-11, 11:26 PM
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Thanks Bob999. Will get test done.
 
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Old 01-15-12, 12:02 PM
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Hi Jordan,

We live in southern NH and had iron in our well, as you do. Funny, when we moved here 10 years ago, the water was OK. Then, a few years later, some new neighbors built homes several hundred yards up a hill from us. Our water started getting a slight brown hue to it that stained the toilet bowl and also made our white sheets start looking brownish. I figured there was iron in the water after I used Iron Out (got it at HD) to easily clean the toilets.

I had a water treatment company come over, and the fellow said yup, you got iron in your water. He installed a simple filter system next to our pressurized water tank. The filter is a tube of spun polypropylene about 2inches in diameter and maybe 15 inches long.

At first, I replace the filters every months. When I took one out of the housing it would be pretty gummed up with reddish iron slime. Then the intervals would get shorter until the filter would be pretty clogged after just a few days. This was unacceptable, so I called another local water company.

They confirmed we had a lot of iron in the water and installed a large self-cleaning filter tank about 14 inches in diameter and perhaps 4 feet tall. The cyclinder is filled with some sand-like material that's supposed to last 3 or 4 years, then replacing it costs $200 or so. (Expensive sand!). I'll wait til our water turns brown 'til I change it! It has a timing mechanism on it that backflushes every 2 or 3 days for 10 minutes or so to keep the medium clean..

This devices seems to have solved the problem. I still use the other filters, though, and change them every 6 or 8 weeks. When I take them out I can see that there is still a bit of iron sludge, but only a tiny fraction of what I'd have to contend with if I didn't do anything.

By the way, the first basic filter device cost $350 to have installed. The filters cost about $6-8 each I think; I bought a box of 20 filters online some time ago. The larger solution with the tank cost $2K, but I felt we had no option. At least it worked, and there's no visible iron in our water.

I should have asked my neighbors to chip in!

Good luck-- hope this helps!

By the way, how is your System 2000 working out? We're planning on installing one in February to replace our old boiler.
 
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