Well Water Neutralizer Tank


  #1  
Old 06-03-14, 02:11 PM
M
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Well Water Neutralizer Tank

Hi All,

Here is my situation:

I have well water. My water system has two large water tanks and a carbon-based filtration tank. In conjunction with the filtration tank is a separate tank where I add chlorine and it pumps through the system and is removed by the filtration tank.

Turns out - my ph is low - about 5.5 - but I don't need the entire chlorine system. A service guy took a look and told me I could swap out the large poly/fiberglass carbon filtration tank with a neutralizer tank.

I looked on line but virtually all neutralizer systems come with the electronic control head as well as the tank. Any idea if I can get the tank (a #14 size) by itself somewhere?

Guy is quoting me $995 to replace the tank. I think I should be able to do it in the $400 range with tank and salt.

Thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 06-03-14, 06:07 PM
Z
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Hi Matt Ė

I put in an Acid Neutralizer in my house. My ph was 5.5 also. As far as I know there are 2 kinds of Acid Neutralizers: up-flow and down-flow. The link below explains the difference. I used the down-flow and those require the valve you are referring to on the top of the tank. The up-flow doesnít require the valve on the top of the tank. Probably the service guy is talking about using an up-flow.

The down-flow requires a drain because the material has to be backwashed periodically or it will cement down in the tank restricting the water flow and you will lose water pressure. Backwashing also cleans the material. So with the down-flow tanks the valve can be either an automatic or manual. You set the automatic valve to the day(s) and time you want the tank to backwash. With the manual valve you have to start the backwash manually. In either case you also need to route the backwash from the tank to a drain.

I probably misunderstand what you are saying but you donít use salt in the Acid Neutralizer tank. You use Calcite (calcium carbonate, I think thatís just chalk) and maybe some Corosex (magnesium oxide) added to it.

But if you already have an injection system for chlorine, I think you have another option to raise the ph. I think you can inject soda ash along with the chlorine. The soda ash will raise the ph. There are pros and cons regarding soda ash injectors vs. acid neutralizer tanks. But if you already have the injection system maybe soda ash would be better? But you would think the service guy would have mentioned that.

Which is Better Upflow Neutralizers or Downflow Calcite Neutralizers for Acid Well Water | The Clean Well Water Report
 
  #3  
Old 06-04-14, 06:04 AM
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Hi Zoesdad,

Thanks for your reply.

You are right that I could go with the injection system. I actually ruled that out because - given our water consumption (fairly big house and # of people) it will cost more on an ongoing basis to maintain in terms of buying/replacing the sacrificial materials.

I have the complete set up as far as the tank goes. I have a control head that is in fine condition and all the plumbing is set up (including a drain above the unit). All I really need to do is swap out the tank and put the material in.

I've actually got a line on the tanks since I posted the initial post yesterday. I'm still looking for info, but I should be able to do the whole job for much less than the pump company wants.
 
  #4  
Old 06-04-14, 08:53 AM
Z
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hi Matt -

It seems to me too that you could save a lot of money if you just need buy the tank and material and load the material. And if that guy is quoting $995 for that( lol)Ė I think youíll save a whole lot of money.

But one thing I would suggest, and maybe you have already done this, is to make sure your gals/min flow from your well pump is high enough to adequately backwash the material in the tank. When I was looking into the AN Filters I found that the bigger the tank the more gals/min is needed to backwash. If the backwash flow isnít great enough, the material will cement down over time. I heard that some companies that sell AN Filters (tank plus valve) were understating the gals/min required to backwash their unit, and so some of the units would cement down over time if the backwash flow was inadequate. But I donít know whether that accusation is really true.

If you look at the AN Filters at cleanwatersystems.com or ohiopurewater.com etc. you will see as the tank size goes up, the amount of material in the tank goes up, and on the positive side the gals/min service flow also goes up Ė but so does the backwash gals/min requirement. I think some of the big tanks require 10 gals/min backwash rate.

Just thought Iíd mention that in case you didnít know.
 
 

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