Connecting Water Softener

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Old 12-30-19, 12:29 PM
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Connecting Water Softener

All,

I had a rented softener system which was returned, and am now planning to connect a new softener to the house. I have attached photos of how it looks now. I have two 1" flexible pipes to connect the softener to the house. One end of each is threaded, the other is a sweat adapter.

As far as I can tell, I connect the threaded connectors to the house, and the sweat adapters to the softener. However, when the plumber from Culligan installed and removed my rented system, he placed on two connectors, one of which I cannot get loose. As you can see in the photos, one of them is a simple threaded connector (the grey one) to which I should be able to connect the flexible pipe easily. However, the other, I cannot loosen at either end from either the copper or the blue pipe. Any thoughts as to how I might get it off? Any other advice? Thank you!
 
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Old 12-31-19, 07:38 AM
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At the top and bottom of that cheap plastic ball valve that's needs to go in the trash there is a ring that when compressed will release the valve.
I just us an adjustable wrench instead of the special tool to do this.
Make sure the main water supply is off and pressure has be relieved!
 
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Old 12-31-19, 08:47 AM
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If it was my house, I would remove all the plastic pieces and solder in 90's and threaded adaptors onto the copper so they pointed away from the wall.

Then using PVC or CPVC pieces I would make the connections from the copper to the water softener bypass valve.

Want to really make a good job, install a couple ball valves in the lines from copper to the bypass valve!
 
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Old 12-31-19, 09:52 AM
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joecaption - thank you for the advice on how to remove that!

Marq1 - when you say "solder," I assume you mean just that, with a soldering iron, rather than a true weld?
 
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Old 12-31-19, 09:59 AM
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I agree with the previous posts. I have no idea what your specific facts are or your water issues, but it's often worthwhile to have a sediment filter as well as a softener. If that's your situation, now is a good time to add the filter between the water supply and the softener. A 10" sediment filter housing can be found for around $30.
 
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Old 12-31-19, 10:17 AM
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Tony P.,

Looking around out there, appears there are a ton of different manufacturers, like Omnifilter, GE, Pentek, etc. I'm guessing I will stick with GE, even though I'm paying a bit more, so as to have filter supply available. Any reason not to do that?
 
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Old 12-31-19, 12:53 PM
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I assume you mean just that, with a soldering iron, rather than a true weld?
I guess the true name is sweat, where you use a torch, solder and flux to joint the copper components!

Check out the line of Big Blue Pentex whole house filter housings, bullet proof, have currently and in prior homes, a good product and you can find all types of standard filter cartridges for them!
 
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Old 12-31-19, 02:03 PM
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Looking around out there, appears there are a ton of different manufacturers, like Omnifilter, GE, Pentek, etc. I'm guessing I will stick with GE, even though I'm paying a bit more, so as to have filter supply available. Any reason not to do that?
Big Blue filter housing was mentioned earlier and that's a good choice. It's a standard size, 20X4.5 so you won't have trouble finding filters. You may also want to consider 10X2.5. These filters are much cheaper and you may not notice any difference beyond the need to replace the filters more often.

There is no need to buy a particular brand. They come in several types and perhaps a dozen micron particle filtration sizes. It's probably too much variety to discuss in a post so I suggest looking into it online and asking some questions
 

Last edited by Tony P.; 12-31-19 at 02:36 PM.
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