Is water softener 25 ppm OK.


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Old 04-22-20, 06:16 AM
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Is water softener 25 ppm OK.

Prior to getting my Fleck 5600 SXT water softener last year, hardness was approx. 189 ppm. The 5600 is producing 25 ppm. While I'm satisfied with the water, I've been wondering why it's not zero, if I should care, and what I can do to lower the ppm.

Thoughts, please.

Here's the program:
DF GAL
VT df1b
CT FD
NT 1
C 30 (30X1000 / 1.5CUFT)
H 11 (189/17.1)
RS SF
SF 5
DO 7
RT 2am
BW 10
BD 60
RR 10
BF 6
FM t0.7
 
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Old 04-22-20, 12:21 PM
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Any water softener has a max grain capacity to absorb calcium and magnesium ions, if your water exceeds that threshold then it cant remove any more.

A larger bed or more frequent regenerations will provide a greater capacity!

How soft is soft, I recall seeing a rating once but it's probably a personal choice, just like your tolerance to hard water!
 
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Old 04-22-20, 03:02 PM
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Mark, thanks for responding. This topic is very frustrating to me. I know very hard water creates problems and very soft water creates problems (like corrosiveness) but I've seen little to say what's "good". I actually don't really want to get to zero because of potential issues plus the salt consumption necessary so I'll just leave it where I am.
 
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Old 04-23-20, 06:10 PM
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25ppm is fine, but when are you measuring it? right after regeneration, or right before? how much iron do you have? if there is iron in your water then it is clogging your softener. regular salt regeneration does not remove iron. over time its capacity will degrade. you should measure hardness right before regeneration to ensure the softener is still producing soft water at that time.

I also don't think corrosion from softened water is anything to be concerned with.
 
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Old 04-24-20, 02:37 AM
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sky jumper, thanks for your input. Hardness is 4 and iron is 0.04 so I'm fine there.
 
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Old 04-24-20, 03:02 AM
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I was curious because it's been so long since I've dug into the numbers for my system so I looked it up. So your numbers line up, over 180 very hard, under 60 soft.

Probably the only way you can get lower more is with an RO system.

This is what I installed, RO post water treatment, plumbed to kitchen sink and refrig for drinking and ice. Ive never tested my RO water, might do that just to see what it comes in at!

Hardness is caused by compounds of calcium and magnesium, and by a variety of other metals. General guidelines for classification of waters are: 0 to 60 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as calcium carbonate is classified as soft; 61 to 120 mg/L as moderately hard; 121 to 180 mg/L as hard; and more than 180 mg/L as very hard.
 
 

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