Sediment water filter selection


  #1  
Old 09-16-20, 04:43 AM
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Sediment water filter selection

I've studied water filters for 2 years, reading everything I could find. I'm still at a loss, though, in being able to determine the two most important variables: the type of filter and the micron density. Any information would be appreciated.

In terms of filter cartridge type, clearly pleated filters are considered superior to spun filters as a general rule because of their larger surface area. However, pleated filters come in a single micron size so varied sediment size can create a mismatch. Given that sediment invariably is not uniform in size, it seems to me that gradient filters should always be preferred. So, why would someone use a pleated filter and how can they tell which micron density to use?

Which gets to micron density. Conventional wisdom is to start with a middle of the road micron density, say 20 microns, and increase or decrease microns as needed. But, how does someone make that decision? We need a microscope to see smaller than 35 microns so how does someone evaluate micron size?

It seems to me that everyone just guesses, like I've been doing.
 

Last edited by Tony P.; 09-16-20 at 06:08 AM.
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Old 09-16-20, 07:36 AM
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So what is it your wanting to filter?

If it's city water then 5 micron is ok since the water is clean. Well water, which I have, 20 micron since anything smaller tends to clog up fast.

Type of filter, what ever is cheap since they get thrown away. I use polypropylene and change out every 4 months.

Big blue 4.5 x 10" filter housings.
 
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Old 09-16-20, 08:01 AM
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Don't know your needs but I have a series of three filters for my bored well. I have two of the whole house filters that use the poly cartridges about 2x10, both 5 micron, then a much larger filter using a filter cartridge perhaps 8x10. For that last one I use the rs16 model filter. I have no water pressure problem using this system.

The first filter catches the bulk of sediment and is changed monthly and is always very dirty. The second filter cartridge is used for a month and catches very little sediment so it gets swapped to the first filter housing each month. The third filter is changed annually.

The 2x10 filters at the big box stores are ridiculously priced so I buy them online in a box of 50 for less than $2 each.
 
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Old 09-16-20, 01:46 PM
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Marq1, your comment
Well water, which I have, 20 micron since anything smaller tends to clog up fast.
illustrates my problem. It sounds like you have substantial sediment at less than 20 microns but you're willing to accept not filtering that sediment because you want filters to last 4 months and smaller micron filters don't achieve that. That strikes me as being imprecise but as good of an approach as any.

In my case, I use 5 micron gradient filters. I installed a pressure gauge and change the filter when pressure drops to 40 psi. Obviously imprecise, as well.
 
  #5  
Old 09-16-20, 04:08 PM
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Actually I have very little sediment, but I do have soluble iron.

Soluble iron is not the same as sediment because without the filter the water softner would handle but the filter acts as a pre-treatment. Anything smaller and it would be saturated in a few days.

If your so concerned then just get an RO which is 1 micron, you dont need to filter your toilet water that fine!
 
 

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