Welding Help

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  #1  
Old 11-01-02, 01:19 PM
welderboy
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Welding Help

I just bought a new Millermatic 210 welder and was hoping there was someone local to the Sacramento, CA area who would help me out with my welds in exchange for $$$ or time using the welder. I'm following all of the basic instructions I have but I don't feel like I'm getting it quite right.
With the wire speed and power set to the recommended levels I don't seem to be getting very much penetration especially on T'd welds. Also the bead looks almost completely smooth on top. I can turn up the power but then I over heat the metal. I know I should probably take a class but the only ones I have found are through the Community collage and are a full semester long, I just don't have that kind of time. Thanks for any help.

Jake
 
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  #2  
Old 11-01-02, 05:56 PM
T
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Practice, practice, practice. Just like they say about a musical instrument.If its penetration you want, then space your metal apart a little....... Really you want a smooth looking bead anyway, right? As long as your not getting an undercut at the edges of your bead I wouldn't be too concerned.... I haven't done alot of MIG welding as some others have but I've been in the trade for about 20 years..... Sberry should be along sometime also. He will give you some perspective on this as well. Good Luck.
 
  #3  
Old 11-01-02, 08:52 PM
S
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Good machine you have just purchaced. I looked at them in the store the other day because of questions here. I am going to assume you are using .035 wire and I tend to like C25 gas on it although outhers will work. It is kind of difficult to diagnose problems from here but here are a couple of tips. Wire feed is constant voltage and a stick machine is constant amperage. This sometimes takes some getting used to if you have some stick experience. With stick you can crank up the heat a bit if you want more. With wire this is marginally adjustable. Lets use 21 arc volts as an example. This wire is going to run best at 21. We dont really turn the heat up for more power,,, we turn the wire speed up and deliver more wire and turn the voltage adjustment up untill we are running at 21 again. We dont go 16 volts for cold or 26 for hot. You can slow up the wire feed for a given heat usually untill it pinholes and you can actually see it trying to burn back ,,, just like it cant keep up. Too much wire and it will be pushing into the puddle. You want the tip about 3/8 from the puddle. Yopu need to be constant with this distance,, changing it effects current and heating of the wire after it leaves the tip. Remember, with a light plate you can overheat it by adding too much weld very easily if you trying to add to much wire and the travel is to slow. One advantage of feeders is that high currents can be used because you dont have to worry about heating the electrode like sticks. I learned on sticks and it took me a bit to get used to wire too,, but its been a while and its second nature,,, harder to explain it than do it. Ask around,, there area a lot of welders out there,, but also there are a lot of people that think they know too. Once you get the hang and a couple of lessons it takes very little to get fairly good,, dont give up hope,, you made a wise decision buying this tool. Just point this thing in the crack of the joint and go,, dont weave it around on a T weld,, just drag along untill you get the speed right. Now we can get an engineer here somewhere to fill in some details,, but remember this basic. The voltage adjustment effects the actual arc length and the wire speed effects the current. The voltage is increased with current to provide a stable arc. Maybe someone will come along who has legitimate expertise in wire feeds,,, like a lot of this after while we develop instinct and dont really tend to think about it much.
 
  #4  
Old 11-04-02, 08:01 PM
alumtuna
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welderboy,

Dont worry the solution is right in front of you!

The settings that come w/ the machine could be minimum values and could be 10-20% more depending on set up, ambient conditions etc. Best thing is to buy a short book and you would notice that after reading it it would come down to a few principles.

If you were to skip all that Practice welding on two pieces of metal butted together w/ a gap (say 1/16 in). Hammer the pieces appart to see how well they hold. This would give an indication of how well you welded them together. All pieces would break apart given a large enough hammer.

Regards from the Bay
 
  #5  
Old 11-17-02, 04:00 AM
DDunigan
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Jake
Sorry, no were near you. However, one of my machines that I use at home is also a MM 210. If you want to e mail me directly, I might be able to help you some by sending you some example pictures of welds and the oscillation technique that I used to produce them.

If you aren t interested in the above offer here is a little info to possibly help you on your T joint.

If you are running an .030 or .035 solid wire and C25 shielding gas on 1/8" -1/4" material with roughly the recommended parameters, you need to use some type of oscillation motion to guarantee good fusion into the legs of the fillet weld that you are producing. Most times, a side to side motion is all that you need to use for a flat or horizontal fillet . The reason this motion is needed is because at the recommended parameters the mode of metal transfer is known as short circuit transfer. In short circuit transfer your filler wire is shorting against the base metal burning back slightly and then shorting again at a very high rate. So because of this a weave should be used to help guarantee good fusion through out the entire weld bead. Ussually, in short circuit transfer just traveling straight on a T joint on the above mention material thickness range produces a weld bead that has some cold lapping. This basically means that there is a lack of fusion along the outer edge of the weld bead. This is one problem that the GMAW process has in short circuit transfer. The weld bead can look good on the surface, but have very little fusion into the base metal. As an example, a guy(self taught weldor)I work with built a guard rail for a peice of equipment out of 1 1/2" x 1 1/2"x .120 wall sq. tube. On the surface the welds looked pretty good. However, it ended up getting hit by a forklift on one end, and the welds failed. Most of the welds that failed had quite a bit of lack of fusion into the base metal. And remember this is only .120 wall tube. He welded these joints out a the same parameters that I would . Just the wrong technique. Anyway, to finish my story Repairing the rail became my assignment. And of course about a month later someone once again ran into the same end of the rail. However this time NO welds failed. Instead, the 1 1/2" sq. tube sheared into two peices. Now that is kind of scary to think how hard someone had to hit the rail to shear the tube. Anyway, after this incident I finally got the permission to fabricate a real rail out of 3"x 3" x 1/4" wall sq tube. Welded the joints out with another mode of GMAW metal transfer known as spray transfer- very deep penetration. So far this rail has been hit at least a 1/2 dozen times and hasn t budged an inch.

I haven t mentioned it yet but it is probably some what obvious that my profession is welding. Been welding for 13 + years now. Started out by taking stick, MIG , TIG , and other neccessary classes at my local college. If you real want to learn to weld the 3 months that a semester take is well worth any slight inconvience that it might create. You would easily learn more in this short period of time then you would in probably 5 years teaching yourself.

Sorry about the long post . I hope the moderator doesn t boot me out of here after just my first posting.

Danny
 

Last edited by DDunigan; 11-17-02 at 06:33 AM.
  #6  
Old 11-17-02, 02:58 PM
S
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Danny,,, that was a great post,, we need more like it. I totally agree with taking a couple of classes and the theory about how much its worth. You are so right about the self taught thing. As I have eluded to before,,, I have seen guys welding for 30 years in factories and in other places,,, they are not much better than a couple weeks after they start. They have just been doing the same wrong thing and have hit the wall as far as skill level goes. It doesnt take all that long to get it,,,,I have shown some people in an hour or 2 and they get it quite well. Develop bad habits early and they are hard to break.
 
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