heavy equipment welding

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Old 01-01-03, 07:56 PM
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heavy equipment welding

Hey guys! I am a farmer and have done alot of welding over the years, I probably make alot of mistakes with rod selection, techniques, etc...Some welds hold, some dont! lol, but heres the question : whats the best rod to use on heavy equipment, to be exact, Ive broken the thumb loose on the stick of our excavator. I heard somewhere to use 120,000 lbs ts stainless rod with alot of amps, but ive had to remove beads like that before and as you know, a torch wont cut stainless steel. Is this still the best choice, or should I use something better? There Is a chance I may have to remove it later, and thats a lot of grinding!
 
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Old 01-02-03, 07:43 PM
scrapiron
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I knew you were a farmer when you were thinking ahead about the problems you'll have fixing it the next time it breaks. Many times you have to grind out a variety of metals, epoxys, and sealants in an old weld just to get to some good base metal.
Usually, with the exception of stress fractures, most failures are either in the base metal near the weld or where the bead tears away from the base metal and not in the weld itself. Most of my work is on ag and construction stuff and 7018 is my favorite. I feel that grinding out a good vee to allow for proper penetration and fill, along with some auxillary bracing to spread out the load is most essential to a good repair. Don't misunderstand, the very high tensile rods have a place but in my work I haven't seen the need (so far!).
Proper joint preparation and a can of fresh, dry, 7018 rods would be my solution. Let us know what you decide to do.
 
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Old 01-11-03, 10:27 AM
Portable Welder
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Heavy equipment

I weld on heavy equipment every day, the rod you want to use is 7018. If you use a stainless rod you may have to grind it out just like you said.
If you have a mig welder I strongly recomend you use it because you can be done twice as fast and the wire you want to use will have the # 70- S6 the S6 lets you know its the same as 7018

The most important thing to know when it comes to welding heavy equipment is that you need to grind out the old broken weld. an ( air arc ) works better and faster than a grinder, V-ee groove your crack, Remember this: if the plate your repairing is 1" thick and you put a 1/4" weld on it to fix it, it is only 25% . Good Luck
 
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Old 01-11-03, 12:20 PM
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Yes, agreed about he lo-hi. When welding thick plates make sure and preheat the base metal especially in cold weather,, I think 1 inch is a min of 150 degrees,, dont quote me exact. The weld should not cool and shrink so fast is the reason for heating. The plate is so heavy it is a big heat sink.
 
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Old 01-19-03, 07:41 PM
Skaggydog
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Re: heavy equipment welding

E-7018. If you need the 120,000 lb. ts (witch I doubt) you could use E-12018, but you may need some pre- and/or post-heat. E-8018 or E-9018 may be considered, but anything over the tensil stringth of your parent metal is redundent.
 
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Old 01-20-03, 05:24 AM
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thanks for the replys guys! I got the 7018's, ground out all the old weld I could get to, and heated the plates with my rosebud before I welded them back. Im clearing a small woods and Im picking up 2 and 3 ft. diameter logs so Im putting it to the test for sure! So far so good! Would that also be the rod of choice for welding on a new cutting edge for our ditch bucket? thanks
 
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Old 01-20-03, 09:16 AM
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I am not sure about cutting edges, I have put some on with 7018 but there might be a better way. Again , warm parts but this doesnt mean hot, up to 1 inch not more than you can hold your hand on. There are exact heat recomendations but right now I dont recall. The thicker the hotter.
 
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Old 01-20-03, 04:51 PM
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Hello, your getting some good advice here. As far as a rod for a cutting edge, yes, there are rods designed for that purpose. We use a type at work from the Eutectic Corp. called 6HSS. We have had pretty good success with it. I think it goes on at around 60 Rockwell "C"or so. I think it is quite expensive though, so if you have alot of buildup to do that may be a factor. We've used it some for putting an edge on snomobile slides..... I'm sure there are other welding rod vendors where your located that could sell you a comparable product, just ask around. Good Luck.
 
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Old 01-21-03, 07:47 AM
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Check here

good guy,,, very knowlegdable

http://www.usalloysweldtech.com/
 
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Old 01-24-03, 03:54 PM
Portable Welder
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Heavy equipment welding

Cutting edges, When I put on cutting edges I preheat the material and as your welding it on, work your way all the way across so you keep it evenly heated as you go, dont make wide welds try to run stringers instead of wide thin welds.
If its a real cutting edge it is designed to be welded, If the material is to hard they would give you shanks to weld on and then you pin the teeth to the shank as I do with excavator buckets. when your putting wear bars on, a common steel is called ( A R ) plate I use AR 235 which doesnt require as much preheat as the AR400 and when I need better wearability I use the AR400. Good Luck.
 
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