working with copper sheet

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Old 07-27-03, 05:04 PM
J
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working with copper sheet

Is there any resouce for working with copper sheet for dummies?
I'd like to try to make wall art out of copper but haven't a clue on how to make decorative cuts or stick it together.
 
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Old 07-30-03, 10:10 AM
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copper

lots of ways lock seam it solder it rivet it ED
 
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Old 07-30-03, 12:24 PM
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justuschickens:

Here is some info on joining copper tubing but sheet would fasten the same way.
http://www.cda.org.uk/homepage.htm

Just punch in how to solder copper into Google and you will get 108,000 hits.
 
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Old 07-30-03, 03:22 PM
SalvageCzar
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Back in April a regular forum member and talented artist named "diylady" started a thread in this section called "cutting copper" and received some good advice. My cousin added some of his experiences working with our Aunt who operated a metal arts studio in the Greenwich Village section of NYC. So you may want to search that thread.

I honestly haven't seen too much copper sheet art with solder, and I may be wrong, but I've been lead to believe that soldering is a no-no. Over time copper changes it's patina and bland silver soldered joints take away from that. Some copper art is acid washed, and the solder reacts much differently. Nearly all the copper sheet art I've seen was very carefuly fitted and held together by bending seams and with hems, all made with a sheet metal brake.
 
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Old 07-30-03, 05:33 PM
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Thumbs up Good tip SalvageCzar

Here is a link to the "cutting copper" thread: http://forum.doityourself.com/showth...hreadid=128621
 
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Old 07-31-03, 06:16 AM
NutAndBoltKing
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A tip: When buying copper sheet stock - especially for art projects where matching or mismatching materials is important - I think it is important to ask for the MDS (Material Data Sheet) of the stock.

An MDS will very clearly list all the properties and materials in the stock by percentage. For example, on copper it will list how much copper, nickel, iron, zinc, cadmium, silver, sulfur, manganese, etc etc the stock contains.

That may seem unimportant - but the properties of copper sheet varies from manufacturer to manufacturer, and the properties of a sheet from one company will not usually match the properties in a sheet from another company. Examples: 1) One company may add more zinc than another company for increased corrosion resistance. That sheet with the extra zinc will age differently from others with less zinc - while both may turn dark from age or change to green from climatic exposures there will be dramatic differences in the shades that they turn to and when they begin to turn. 2) The difference in the properties of the two sheets may affect the fit and finish of the joints and seams that you braze or solder. One sheet with more nickel or silver than another with less can be joined together easily by brazing or with solder, but they will both react differently to the same heat - one sheet may darken and stipple while the other sheet is unaffected.

A beautiful piece of metal wall or garden art that might have taken weeks or months to produce can sometimes later disappoint if unmatched materials are used.
 
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Old 07-31-03, 06:46 AM
NutAndBoltKing
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Another tip, and apologies for my rambling; I frequent sales that are held when companies move or go out of business, and I have occasionally purchased metal sheet stock for resale. Nearly every sheet of the copper and brass stock I now have out in my shop has something that drives the artists and other buyers crazy - FINGERPRINTS. It seems that denatured alcohol and other mild solvents will remove the prints left behind by the oils in our fingers, but some copper is more sensitive than others and the fingerprints sometimes turn black and won't seem go away - so wear gloves when doing your artwork.
 
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Old 07-31-03, 09:03 AM
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OH YES

Oh yes the cloves on when working with copper.Did one job , a very large hood for over the front of a fireplace. put in standing seams and all , The whole time I worked on it and the guys helping had gloves on . it came out like a dream. two weeks later was back in the home to fire off the AC. Went to look at the hood
and it was beat up dents ,bumps you name it. I asked what happen. They said the owner didnt like the clean cooper look so he told them to just beat it up some all over. OH WELL ED
 
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Old 08-01-03, 10:44 PM
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Thanks everyone! Some great tips and some things I've never thought of as well. Now I feel like I've got a place to start.I'll let you know how it turns out.
I think you hit the nail on the head with the story of the hood...
its why I find it hard to let my creations go,you never know how someone is going to alter the work.
 
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