Copper Countertops

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Old 10-08-03, 09:19 AM
marymoe
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Question Copper Countertops

I really want copper countertops in my kitchen. My understanding is that the copper sheet covers a wood substrate. Does anyone know what type of copper (weight/gauge) should be used and where it can be purchased? The counter will be U-shaped, so there will have to be seams - should they be soldered, or is there a better method for this?
 
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Old 10-08-03, 11:45 AM
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copper

The copper you want to use will come in 3'X8' and 16 oz.
Now dont forget copper is soft so I would use a hard backing for it here so it wont dent . Now the seams dont know what lay out you have to work the copper. But for a nice smooth top here. put the copper together with a 1/2" lockseam upside down. Then saw out in the backing for this seam. You will only have to saw our about an 1/8" . When you turn it back over all you will have is this line in the copper thats all. Id let it be But you could run a very small bead of solder down it if you want. On the face of this U dont know how big or deep? Could do the bottom in a hem edge and the top part a slip or like short Pittsburgh for the face edge. turn about a 1/4" down on the top Tap it in this and run a light solder bead on it Hope this help some ED
 
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Old 10-08-03, 11:54 AM
NutAndBoltKing
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About the seams ....

My Aunt was a NYC Greenwich Village metal artist who, back in the 60s, also made copper countertops, range hoods, and etc etc. Nearly all the countertops she made were fashioned from just one (1) sheet, but she would use "bolt seams" wherever a joint between two sheets was unavoidable

"Bolt seams" are just that, held togethor with bolts (also made of copper) that pass underside through the 90 degree finished ends of each piece. She would sometimes use rivets as well, but it was still called a bolt seam.

This "bolt seam" technique for joining two sheets is still used now-a-days. There are also colored epoxies available, like the type required for laminates and solid surfaces.
 
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Old 10-08-03, 12:31 PM
marymoe
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copper countertop

Thanks so much for the information - Ed, do you happen to know a source for purchasing the copper?
 
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Old 10-08-03, 01:01 PM
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copper

If you are thinking over the net here forget it. Id say look in your phone book there and call around and see what you can get it for. A Tin shop or if they say Sheetmetal shop. Copper goes up and down so to say the cost I cant say. Find a company that has it on hand if they have to order it in that will cost a lot more. Now you dont want to use that standing seam here . You want just a plain old lock seam here to put the sheet together an let them lay flat for you.You dont say how big the U is. Just IF, 2 sheets like one for each leg of the U and one sheet side to side for the bottom of the U. If you lay it out take it to the tinshop and let them bend it up for you on their brake. If you have to solder it some wash it there right away. This way it will all age at the same time ED
 
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Old 10-08-03, 01:14 PM
brickeyee
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You could try a roofing supply house. they will have 16 oz copper (weight per square foot) in 3 ft x 10 ft sheets, and they shold run about $60 per sheet. When the price of copper went down a few years ago the sheets went to 10 feet to prop the price up.
 
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Old 10-09-03, 06:28 AM
NutAndBoltKing
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I stopped at one of my cousin's salvage yards this morning for some things and checked the countertops he had there. One was copper - pretty beat up, but I wanted to see the seams.

The countertop was affixed to particle board, an "L" shape; 24" wide from the 4 1/2" high backsplash to curved front. The long leg was 6'5" and the short was 3'4" joined by one butt seam that had dowels and draw bolts.

At one time it was a beautiful countertop. I can understand why you want one. Good luck.
 
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Old 10-09-03, 10:00 AM
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Countertops

Ill bet if you go back and look at that top it came together at the 90o L with a 45o seam. Here we bend the copper at just a 90o down in the seam. then like with all countertops its drawed together with just the draw bolts under the counter just in the particle board like all counters tops are made of this day and age .

At 6'5" one way and 3'4" the other . Backsplash, hem on the curved edge. Ill bet who ever made it had a good box and pan brake in the shop.

But when I dont have a 45o turn in it and I have one longer than 8' The way to go is with a lock seam on the back side of it.
As for the 10' long sheets. I cant work it and I know of no shop around that can. Have 8' press brake 8' hand brake and 8' shears. Any and all roll stock gets cut to 8'. On the copper bays , roofs and copper domes. We work with the 8' copper only all the time
 
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Old 10-30-03, 01:02 PM
Giuseppe
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Re: Copper Countertops

I liked Ed's suggestion about the seams: turn it down and leave well enough alone . Since it is in the kitchen area you might want to run a bead of clear, food-grade silicone sealant along the crack, which you can replace as it wears.

I would not use solder in any food preparation area. Most solder contains lead, which you do not want on your baloney sandwich.
 
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Old 10-30-03, 01:07 PM
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copper tops

Think 95---5 solder for this job ED
 
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Old 10-31-03, 05:36 AM
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Lead free solder should be available in your area.
Around here you are not allowed to use lead based solder for potable water lines or food contact areas.
 
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