Clarke Welders...............Your thoughts

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Old 12-09-03, 12:32 PM
Kevin67
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Clarke Welders...............Your thoughts

I am looking at doing light home welding maybe once a month. I am looking at this Clarke product.
http://doityourself.com/store/clarke_vp.htm Mig / Fluxcore 130En 110 Volt by Clarke. Does anyone know about this brand..........
Thanks in Advance
 
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Old 12-09-03, 09:24 PM
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Kevin67:

If you were wanting to purchase this type of welder you would be much better off with the next model up which is a 180 amp 220 volt unit.
You would soon find yourself limited by the poor duty cycle of the 110 volt machine.

<img src="http://images.orgill.com/200x200/6099147.jpg">
 
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Old 12-09-03, 09:42 PM
Kevin67
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Thanks,
I do not have a 220 outlet, I guess I coud wire one in the garage......
 
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Old 12-09-03, 10:01 PM
Kevin67
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What if I were to use a voltage converter, would this work?
 
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Old 12-09-03, 10:19 PM
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Is your garage attatched to your house, if so wire in a 240 circuit. The 240V machines work way better no matter what the brand. Personaly I wouldnt buy anything but one of the big 3, Hobart /Miller, Lincoln or Esab. One of the best ones in this class is the Hobart Handler 175. Use 030 solid wire and C25 gas. Tractor supply has them as a kit, often on sale, well worth the couple hundred more and comes with a fantastic warranty. Its quality, as easy as any to operate and Hobart is going to support this machine with service for a LONG time, which you probably never need. There are a lot of problems with off brand where welders are not the main product. Tips, gun liner etc.
 
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Old 12-10-03, 05:00 AM
Kevin67
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Thanks for your input.............
 
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Old 12-10-03, 05:35 AM
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Kevin67:

IMO I would say that a 110 volt welder of any type would be a waste of money and it's poor performance could turn you off to welding.
Your best investment would be to equip your garage with a decent service and buy an inexpensive 220 volt welder likwe the Clarke to see if you enjoy the hobby.
A 60 amp service would allow you to plug in any consumer welder or even a heater.
 
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Old 12-10-03, 06:28 AM
Kevin67
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Thanks,
I have so much info I am a bit confused. My friend that is certified welder (although does not weld much) has a Lincoln 120v 135amp
welder and he uses gas. He loves the machine and has no issues with it. The responces I get from boards are do not go with the 110v. IS 10v that big of a difference...........
Thanks again
 
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Old 12-10-03, 02:22 PM
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Kevin67:

I don't blame you for being confused.

If your friend is happy with his 110 volt machine it's because he uses it for material that is within the machine's capacity.
Something that your friend may not mention is that if he has any serious welding to do he will do it at work.

To be satisfied with a welder you must match your welders duty cycle to the material you intend to weld.
If you will not weld anything thicker than tin used in body work or the occasional broken kitchen chair you likely could do it with the smaller machine.
If you intend to try your hand at 1/8" or better you could do it but the duty cycle would make it a painful job.
I don't have the specifics in front of me but you should be able to dig up the specs for this on your own. It will be the number of minutes of continous welding you can do in a 10 min period.
I would guess the 110 v machine would be less than 20% at full output. 2 min welding and then 8 minutes waiting.

If you search this forum there has been a fair bit of discussion on this topic.

Also while doing a quick Google search on Clarke I came up with this discussion.
Someone recommended DoItyourself.com as having the best prices on these welders.

Forgot to mention to check to see that the 110v machine will run on a 15 amp circuit. A lot of these units require a 20 anp circuit which most people don't have and would require rewiring.
 
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Old 12-10-03, 02:27 PM
Kevin67
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Man thanks you have been a big help.............
Regards,
Kevin
 
  #11  
Old 06-25-05, 08:45 PM
ebikerman
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Clarke Welders

Don't be afraid to purchase the Clarke MIG130EN 110 volt welder. I recently purchased one and it works flawlessly. I am not a welder, but I was able to weld a steel diamond plate tool box to my motorbike trailer. (not sure of the gauge, not real thick) The tool box has no support other than my welds. I think that if you stay within the limits of the welders capability you should have no problem. I used flux core .035 wire and had little problem with spatter on this job, however on my practice welds, I had a lot. I really like mine. You can't beat the warrantee either. 10/2 years. If you will email me xxxxxxxxxxx.
As with many of the welders, chunk the hand held face shield and get a real helmet. It is hard to find the duty cycle on this welder...best I can tell it is 30% at 90 amps and 20% at 100 amps or somewhere close. Surprisingly, 2 min and 3 min duty cycles are more than adequate for small welding jobs. The Clarke MIG 130 EN has a thermal cutoff and it never has cutoff on me yet. My brother bought one of those MIG 100s from Harbor Freight and has welded a trailed hitch on a four wheel trailer. Never cutting off. So it looks like the small ones will do more than some think. Another great feature of this welder is that it has an electrically cold torch...in other woeds, there is no live current until you pull the trigger. That means you can touch the wire to the exact place you want to start your arc while looking at it with the necked eye. Flip your helmet or whatever then pull the trigger to start your arc. Cant beat that. Maybe all have that feature???.
I know some of the real welders will contradict my statements, but I think for a non professional part time small job welder the one you have chosen wil be adequate and fun to use. By the way a 20 amp circuit is reccommended. Dan
 

Last edited by GregH; 06-26-05 at 05:31 AM. Reason: Email address in post not permitted
  #12  
Old 06-27-05, 11:39 AM
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clark welder

hi I have a older clark 100e it works good. for what it was intended for.i recenlty got a millermatic 210. awsome welder but your talking $1500. verses $300.00 so it really depends on your money situation and what you want to do. i did a lot with the clark and still use it for small quick projects.must say i was never happy with the gun on this welder but they may have improved them.also in my area i have very limited places to find parts.only one place to get tips and several times they where out of stock of the ones i needed.i did run into problems with duty cycle.mine did not have a fan.i think one with a fan would have worked better.i would research parts and consumables to see if some one in your area has them. compare prices to lincoln hobart and miller and spend a littel more money to get one of those. but if it comes down to it dont be affriad to get the clark.the newest issue of handyman magazine just did a review on 7 migs they rated the millermatic 135 as top tool. con was price and they rated the craftsman20569 as best value cons:regulator not included,power cord exits from front and erratic wire feed rate. check it out at Handymanclub.com
good luck
 
  #13  
Old 10-12-05, 06:58 AM
drjohn71a
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Reply to old question re: 110 V Clarke Welders: I used to have a lincoln 300 tig setup as well as gas, etc.. I am saving to get a nice Miller TIG setup, but had some farm welding to do and stumbled across Clarke's HotShot, Spool Gun, 135 amp, 110 volt MIG machine on sale at Tractor Supply. It has a 40% duty cycle and goes up to .035 wire, gas or fluxed. It has a unique torch collar designed to alllow you to just drag the collar across the substrate as you weld, leaving the less than 1/4 inch gap you need for most welds. Most handy is that the wire speed adjustment is right on the gun, so remote welding in corners, farm equipment or atop ladders is a breeze. I have welded off and on for over 40 years, and think this type of little machine fills a much needed gap. Even on multiple passes on thick farm equipment welds, it has not shut itself off yet. Worth a try... John
 
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Old 12-23-05, 05:45 AM
crossbuck
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Does anyone have any feedback on the Clarke 180EN MIG welder? There's got to be a reason it's half the price of a comparable MIG from the Big Three. From the spec sheets, the only difference I see is the Clarke won't handle .045 flux core wire. Other than probably being made in China what seperates Clarke from a Hobart?

Would someone who just wanted to fart around making a BBQ pit notice the difference between a Clarke 180 and a Hobart Handler 180?
 
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Old 12-23-05, 10:35 AM
crossbuck
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Well, hopefully I'll be coming on here for years to come and extolling the virtues of the Hobart - I found a great deal and pulled the trigger on a Handler 180. Should be fun.
 
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Old 12-23-05, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Kevin67
Thanks,
I have so much info I am a bit confused. My friend that is certified welder (although does not weld much) has a Lincoln 120v 135amp
welder and he uses gas. He loves the machine and has no issues with it. The responces I get from boards are do not go with the 110v. IS 10v that big of a difference...........
Thanks again
I bet your friend have that 110v 135 mig and a tig machine too, couple of my friend did the same thing.
 
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Old 12-28-05, 09:25 PM
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Wouldn't you know it, two years after the original thread was posted about Clarke welders I recently (it's in the mail) pick up a refurbish Clarke 130EN. This is why I came into this forum section to do a search on the Clarke. I'm always nervous when I read "refurbish" "rebuilt" "remanufacture" etc. but after doing some research on the other big three I decided to take the plunge on this unit.

I understand 220v welders performs better compared to 110v but for me a 110 is most ideal. I'm a novice beginer welder and would prefer the flexibilty of having a 110v, knowing I can go to most homes with the proper amp rating outlet and get to work.

As stated, with a duty cycle of 20% at 100% and 30% at 85% the spec sheet on this Clarke is comparible to the big three. I also read the latest issue of Handyman were they compared other 110v welders, very good info to read. I'm looking forward to firing up the welder for the first time, and it's good to read all the positive things that have been said about a Clarke.

Edit: One quick question
Once you've adjusted the welder setting (wire speed and amperage) to the material you're welding and you're welding without gas (flux core wires) would you have to adjust the setting if decide to switch to solid core and gas with the same material?
 

Last edited by CandiMan; 12-29-05 at 01:41 AM.
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Old 12-29-05, 05:26 AM
lutheranpastor
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No 220 volt outlet?

Originally Posted by Kevin67
Thanks,
I do not have a 220 outlet, I guess I coud wire one in the garage......
You may have an electric clothes dryer (or an outlet for one--even with a gas dryer in use there is usually a 220 volt outlet for an electric dryer behind the dryer.) not far from the garage. A 220 volt MIG welder will not draw the 50 amp. current load that a big stick welder needs. The 30 amps. available in a dryer outlet are sufficient to run a 220 volt MIG machine. You can use a length of #10 three conductor wire to make an extension cord you get out when you need to weld. Just do not try to weld and dry clothes at the same time, unless the dryer runs on natural gas. And, do not make your extension cord so long that a voltage drop due to the extra resistance of a long run becomes a problem. Something under 20 or 30 feet should not be a problem.
 
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Old 12-29-05, 06:36 AM
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Originally Posted by lutheranpastor
You may have an electric clothes dryer (or an outlet for one--even with a gas dryer in use there is usually a 220 volt outlet for an electric dryer behind the dryer.) not far from the garage. A 220 volt MIG welder will not draw the 50 amp. current load that a big stick welder needs. The 30 amps. available in a dryer outlet are sufficient to run a 220 volt MIG machine. You can use a length of #10 three conductor wire to make an extension cord you get out when you need to weld. Just do not try to weld and dry clothes at the same time, unless the dryer runs on natural gas. And, do not make your extension cord so long that a voltage drop due to the extra resistance of a long run becomes a problem. Something under 20 or 30 feet should not be a problem.
It's a safe bet Kevin67 probably never registered since he was a guest back in Dec 2003 so it's unlikely he'll see your recommendation. But it's decent info for those who might be reading this for the first time.
 

Last edited by CandiMan; 01-15-07 at 09:44 AM.
  #20  
Old 01-07-06, 05:37 AM
crossbuck
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"Once you've adjusted the welder setting (wire speed and amperage) to the material you're welding and you're welding without gas (flux core wires) would you have to adjust the setting if decide to switch to solid core and gas with the same material?"

Yes. Ditto if you switch shielding gasses.
 
  #21  
Old 01-15-07, 09:05 AM
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Hello, I too am a beginner with not a lot of money to spend here on a professional setup. I am trying to decide between a two cheaper models. Does anyone have a recommendation between which of these two perform better?

Chicago Dual MIG 151 (from harbor freight)
"reconditioned $159!!!"

vs.

Clarke 130EN
"new $299"

Also, Are the gas regulators innerchangeable between brands? ie. Can I buy a chicago welder and use a clarke gas regulator?
 
  #22  
Old 01-15-07, 01:39 PM
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I would go w/ the Clarke.
Mike
 
  #23  
Old 01-15-07, 02:20 PM
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clarke weldr

Originally Posted by Kevin67 View Post
I am looking at doing light home welding maybe once a month. I am looking at this Clarke product.
http://doityourself.com/store/clarke_vp.htm Mig / Fluxcore 130En 110 Volt by Clarke. Does anyone know about this brand..........
Thanks in Advance
Please spend the extra money for a real welder, before someone gets hurt.
 
  #24  
Old 05-18-11, 08:20 PM
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These guys telling you about how terrible a 110 unit is are full of ****. They are portable and unless you plan to start a fab shop, the duty cycles are probably fine. Try the cheap one first and up-grade later if you find you need more. I can make x-ray inspection quality welds with that cheap one on any thickness material with the right prep. and the proper technique.
 
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