Self Taught Welding Help Request

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  #1  
Old 05-01-04, 03:18 PM
Robshobbies
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Question Self Taught Welding Help Request

Hey eveyone, I am new to welding and would really like to weld. I am only 15 but find my self very handy do alot of wood work soldering ect. but wanna move up to the next level. Because I am 15 I need to teach my self and funds are limited only mby $250-300 to get started. What are some good books to help teach my how to weld and about the equitment and what is a good starter small electric welder I only will be doing like small things like a few toys Thanks..
 
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Old 05-01-04, 04:52 PM
M
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The intial response you're probably going to get from most people is to get a wire feed flux core, because they're the cheapest and possibly the quickest.

Truthfully though, you'll learn a lot more about the weld puddle and how to control it by using either an arc welder, tig welder, or acytelene. An arc welder could be had for cheap, Harbor Freight sells them for about $70, but you're only going to be able to run the real thin rods. These are a bit hard to control at first because they tend to wobble.

Tig welders are well out of the $300 price range unless someone here knows something I don't.

A lot of people may disagree with me here, but I think you could benefit from getting a small cheap acetylene setup and learning to weld (not braze) with that. It will really help you learn how to control a puddle well since you feed the puddle manually, and it will teach you about heat distribution, since you're going to have to learn how to not let the metal get too hot or it will warp.

As far as books and learning, go to your local library and see what you can find there first. Most of learning to weld is going to be practice. Start by welding some small pieces together and breaking them in a vice to see how well you're doing. Pay close attention to anything you can learn about weld defects, because that's where you're going to learn to see just how good you're doing, by learning to pick out visual defects in a weld.

Mathius
 
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Old 05-01-04, 04:53 PM
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Robshobbies,

My suggestion to you is to first try to borrow a few books from the library, maybe even the school library and start reading about it so you can at least get some idea if it would be feasible to get into it.

The welder is just a small part of what you will need to get started.
You have to give serious thought to where you will be doing your welding and if it is a safe place and whether there is enough power to feed the welder.

There has been a tremendous amount of discussion here on the very topic you ask about. A lot of it on "which type of welder to buy."

If you spend some time reading previous posts it may give you an idea of some direct questions you could ask.
 
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Old 05-01-04, 06:52 PM
Robshobbies
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well 1st of half of wat marthius said was told confusion to me lol.. yea wit the finding a power supply and safety ekk i never even thought of that how do u get enuff power im guessing ur avg house ac wont work..
 
  #5  
Old 05-02-04, 08:03 AM
scrapiron
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An oxygen/acetylene outfit is portable, relatively cheap and will teach you welding basics you will need when you start arc welding. Besides welding you can also heat, bend, cut, and braze most metals with it. As with any welding process there are some serious safety issues here. You should read everything you can and check out any high school vo-tech or ag. shop classes. If this isn't possible talk to the owner of a local welding or machine shop. If they can't help you they should be able to send you to someone who can. Most tradesmen love to talk about their craft it's getting them to shut up thats the problem..........

There was an argument among the craftsmen as to whose trade was the most valuable. The King decided to interview each one. He asked the carpenter what he could do. The carpenter replied "With the right tools I can build you shelter". When the farmer was asked the same question he replied "With the right tools I can grow you food" and when the doctor was asked he said "With the proper tools I can save your life". Last was the blacksmith/welder. When the king asked him what he did he replied " I build the tools". The argument was settled.
 
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Old 05-02-04, 11:13 AM
Robshobbies
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I guess the idea of being someones aprentice is a good way to do it.. I will see what I can find i know there some local welding places but getting there is the problem.. thanks everyone you guys showed me how hard it is to get started but how I will also go to the libary and check out some books..
 
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Old 05-02-04, 09:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Robshobbies
well 1st of half of wat marthius said was told confusion to me lol.. yea wit the finding a power supply and safety ekk i never even thought of that how do u get enuff power im guessing ur avg house ac wont work..
Sounds like you don't even know the basic terms yet. That's ok, I'm not putting you down. I'm with GregH on this one. Find some books first, then worry about what welder.

Mathius
 
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