Mechanix gloves for welding?

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Old 08-30-04, 08:02 PM
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Mechanix gloves for welding?

I've seen a few people use mechanix brand gloves as MIG and TIG welding gloves. I like the idea because my regular welding gloves are much larger and clumsier, but is it actually safe to do?
 
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Old 08-31-04, 08:04 PM
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D/C-Fan,

I too wear lighter gloves for some situations especially when working on a bench or downhand.
I prefer the length of real welding gloves when there is a risk of hot little glowing balls running into my sleeves.
 
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Old 08-31-04, 10:45 PM
megaton
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There are specific gloves for MIG/TIG welding they are the same cut as standard welding gloves with the long cuff, but are made of smooth grain cowhide and are unlined, similar material to "drivers gloves". Mechanix gloves should work, but if ya get a sunburn through 'em I would find something heavier. I don't know what type of welding work you are doing, but if you are doing TIG on any type of polished aluminum I would suggest elkskin MIG/TIG gloves. They are pretty expensive, but they won't mar the polished surface.
 
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Old 09-01-04, 12:38 PM
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Gloves

I am going to be doing some custom motorcycle framework. On looking at the mechanix gloves, I also found something called a heat sleeve, it's basically a sleeve that runs all the way up your arm, and is supposed to protect you against sparks and extreme heat.
 
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Old 09-01-04, 02:27 PM
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I have never welded a motorcycle frame but on projects I do of a similar size I always try to position the weld to favor the most comfortable position, which is never overhead.
Standard welders gloves are usually good enough.
 
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Old 09-01-04, 02:42 PM
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Just make sure the gloves aren't made of something that will melt if a chunk of hot metal falls on them or you will not be happy. I was in a hurry to finish welding a railing last year before some rain got here and decided to slip a pair of sneakers on. Needless to say, i learned that i can kick a sneaker off real quick when a chunk of metal fell off and burned through the top.
 
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Old 09-06-04, 04:08 PM
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I messed up a almost new pair of mechanics gloves when I left them laying on the table while mig welding a piece. The splatter melted little holes in the stretch back. Now they feel like something is sticking the back of my hands. I'd stick with a pair of tig gloves.
 
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Old 09-06-04, 04:31 PM
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I usually just weld STARK RAVING NAKED!!!
 
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Old 09-07-04, 02:02 PM
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Wow, you can blind the neighbors before you even plug the welder in..

 
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Old 09-07-04, 07:23 PM
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Mechanix gloves for welding

Originally Posted by D/C-Fan
I've seen a few people use mechanix brand gloves as MIG and TIG welding gloves. I like the idea because my regular welding gloves are much larger and clumsier, but is it actually safe to do?
I would recommend for TIG use only, MIG tears them up fast. Also do not pick up your hot work with theses gloves, take advantage of the dextarity only, and keep a pair of plyers aside.
 
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Old 11-12-04, 09:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Hellrazor
Wow, you can blind the neighbors before you even plug the welder in..

LOL....

i've never used Mechanix, but the Craftsman type are made of a nylon/elastic type stuff, i wouldn't even try. any welding supply place should have TIG gloves for cheap, they have long-ish cuffs, and are made of leather. i bought a set in Wyoming while going to Wyotech, they were about 14 bucks. they're still going after about 6 months, although the seams have torn. at 28 dollars a year, i'd think that's a better rate than using Mechanix gloves. they fit about the same as the Craftsmans do, so i have no problem with dexterity.
 
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Old 11-15-04, 06:31 AM
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Crashbox brings up an older post, but an important one for safety
Mechanix does not yet have a welding glove
Most of their line uses a synthetic spandex and synthetic leather
They melt very easily

Also the heat sleave was mentioned
The heat sleaves are a very loose woven kevlar designed to protect a mechanics arm from burns when working on a hot engine
They work very well for that
Sparks...eh...
But I could see how splatter would go right through the extremely loose weave
And then you'd have to get the sleave off before you got the splatter off you
 
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Old 11-15-04, 06:43 AM
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I use the green welding sleeves. Cover from wrist to shoulder. Don't know what the elastic cuffs are made of but have never had one melt or catch fire. I also give up a little dexterity for heat protection. Hate to have about an inch to go and hand is so hot I have to break the arc and quickly pull off a hot glove.
 
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Old 11-15-04, 07:22 AM
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That sounds much better for welding
The sleeves the poster was refering to will keep you from burning your forearm on a hot header while working on a motor, but are not welding safety equipment
 
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Old 11-29-04, 02:32 AM
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Exclamation proper ppe (personal protection equipment)

just wanted to say hey and here is my first post here (whoot). i am a professional welder and enjoy lending my knowledge to people that have a desire to better themselves.


the mechanix gloves in question would be a terrible glove to use during welding for the simple fact that they are made out of man made materials. man made materials such as spandex, velcro, polyester and various other materials melt when they burn. now this might not sound like a problem but considering the fact that alot of people buy these gloves to work on cars and get grease, oil, and/or possibly some type of fuel, what you have is a worse case senerio. you are welding, sparks ignite the glove, glove catches on fire and you can not get it off, you get burned. now if that is not bad enough when clothing made of synthetic materials burns on flesh, it melts to flesh. so now you have to go to the hospital and have somebody pick out all this plastic stuff out of your skin!! yee haw, sounds like fun. this is why you will never see a professional welder wear any kind of polyester shirt or pants or other types of clothing. it will melt and is not resistant to sparks or fire. cotton or wool based fabrics will tend to smolder for a while where as synthetics will seem to flash burn once they get started. welding gloves are designed to fit loose around the wrist for two reasons. one, so you can throw them off if a spark gets down in there. two, so you can tuck sleeves into the glove and have no flesh exposed. i tig weld on a regular basis and i know for a fact that good gloves are out there that are made thin just for tig welding. please use proper protection, its not worth losing anything over.


post ya later.

red light

btw... one story that comes to mind is about an iron worker that was wearing a new carhartt jacket. the jacket was an artic wear jacket made out of ballistic nylon (i have one just like it). he was welding overhead flux core on some job and his jacket caught on fire. it spread fast and burned him bad. he died of his injuries.
 

Last edited by red light; 11-29-04 at 03:38 AM.
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Old 11-29-04, 05:53 AM
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Welcome, you bring up a good point!

Just reminded me about when I got to have a spin in our Canadian Airforce Hercules, and someone asked why all the crew wore leather gloves during flight in 80 degF weather.
The pilot said that it was regulation because of the potential for fire and also that all man made fabrics except fire retardent Nomex are not allowed to be worn. This is for the same reason that plastics melt and get hotter than when natural material burns.

He told an equally sad story about the military experimenting with the use of synthetic boots and what happened to a surviving pilot's feet in a fire.
 
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Old 11-30-04, 05:50 PM
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Mechanics gloves are dangerous for a lot of uses. Ever see what happens if you get them stuck in a drill press while wearing them? The rotation of the press pulls your hand into the bit while twisting the material. Same goes for wearing them around table saws, RAS, chop saws, etc.

If i am welding small things, i wear a pair of thin cowhide work gloves. Otherwise i wear the big leather welding gloves.
 
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