welding material of thickness x?

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Old 10-16-04, 07:59 PM
Hondo_jr
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welding material of thickness x?

Before I start let me just say, yes I know I need some books, and yes I know I need a class, and I'm looking for both of those. Just not sure I've found the right books yet to be worth buying and nothing on a class yet in my area. But I have a question about welder upgrades and the like.

I'm thinking about upgrading my welder (wire feed 90Amp Lincoln) to a bigger unit. But I'm not really looking forward to taking the hit in my wallet. Also, so far, I haven't needed a bigger welder. My main question is when welding, can I essentially double my material thickness if I weld from both sides (for a butt joint situation), or make multiple passes? Would either of these methods be advised over just getting a welder that can penetrate the material the thickness you need in one pass?

As I type this I realize I have more questions than I could possible get down on screen 8). I really need a book or class or someones brain to pick on a personal basis. But at least this would answer one thing for me. Anyone in here around the Memphis TN area?

Thanks again all,

Sean
 
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Old 10-18-04, 04:08 PM
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Sean,

Yes, you most certainly can make multiple passes, it's done all the time.

What you will have to watch out for is the duty cycle of your machine and the time it will take to complete what you are welding.

A test: Do you know the minutes of welding, at maximum power, you can do in a ten minute period?

This is your duty cycle.
 
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Old 10-18-04, 07:29 PM
Hondo_jr
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Is stopping a problem when making multiple passes? Do you not make one pass, then stop and go over it again? What would be the procedure?

I think I have an impressive 20% duty cycle with my Lincoln 8). Seems kinda low. Is that right or normal?

Thanks,

Sean
 
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Old 10-18-04, 08:42 PM
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Sean,

20% is about right for your welder.
Smaller welders are normally rated at a 20% duty cycle to make their ratings look good.
For comparison my MM-150 has a 20% duty cycle @ 150 amps, 30% @ 120 amps, 60% @ 90 amps and 90% @ 70 amps.

Your duty cycle will allow you to weld at maximum output for 2 minutes with an 8 minute rest.

Depending on what you are welding, two minutes will let you weld a reasonably long bead.
If using flux cored wire you would clean up the flux after each pass and overlap the welds.

Your decision to purchase a bigger unit will be based on your patience in waiting for the machine to cool down.
 
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