Lincoln 135ST welder vs Plus model

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Old 02-01-05, 07:45 PM
kuri77
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Lincoln 135ST welder vs Plus model

Hi, newbie here ready to buy first welder for home. Mostly to do lightweight stuff on my bikes, motorcycles and trailer, etc. From what I can tell the plus model has infinitely adjustable voltage and the other not. Is that a feature I would be likely to miss as a starter or should I spring for the extra $100 or so and get it? Any other comments, pro or con about either of these welders please do so, thanks, Chris
 
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Old 02-02-05, 12:38 AM
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Thumbs up hey, spend the extra dough

hey, welcome. when it comes to the difference between these two machines, one is definitely better than the other. reasons you should spend the extra money for the plus model IMHO:

infinite voltage control will allow you to dial in the perfect setting for all the different welding you will be doing. thin stuff, thick stuff, you get the idea. having the right heat setting is half of the battle.

tap machines (machines, like the non-plus model, that only allow a couple of settings.) tend to have the taps wear out after time. granted it my take alot of years but it is one more hassle. so one day the B setting might not work. so you have to select A or C, or another way of saying it is too cold or too hot.

the other advantage the plus model has is 100 more inches per minute in the wire feed. it goes up to 400 instead of 300. this also leaves you more options.

i'm glad to see that you are willing to spend a little bit for your first welder. the one pet peeve that i have with people is asking about some ho hum 120 dollar welder that they saw and is it any good? i use machines every day that cost thousands of dollars and they are worth every penny. you really do get what you pay for when it comes to welding power sources. i have personally used this machine and it is a good little machine. i'm kind of wondering why i haven't bought one yet myself?? lincoln makes some of the best welders out there. most of the time i am a miller man but lincoln has the edge on this machine. either way you go, if you get a brand name that is going to be around in 50 years you will still be able to get parts. good choice.

a good place to check for welding stuff, no matter what the brand, is a major online auction website (can't advertise it, you know which one).

hope that helps.

post ya later.

redlight
 
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Old 02-02-05, 03:00 PM
Albin
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Originally Posted by red light
hey, welcome. when it comes to the difference between these two machines, one is definitely better than the other. reasons you should spend the extra money for the plus model IMHO:

infinite voltage control will allow you to dial in the perfect setting for all the different welding you will be doing. thin stuff, thick stuff, you get the idea. having the right heat setting is half of the battle.


redlight
+1,000 on this comment. I have 2 welders, both Lincolns. While one is a MIG and one is stick, I love my SP-175-Plus infinite adjustment feature.

A couple of other comments:

- Good to see that you're picking quality. While there are other quality machines, you'll never go wrong with a Lincoln.

- The -135 is a 110 volt machine. Not bad for a beginner either. Any reason you didn't select the -175, which is a 220 volt machine? Cost, having an outlet, see no need....? Just curious. When I selected the -175 Plus, besides picking it due to it being 220 volt plus a Lincoln plus infintie adjustment, was that according to the Lincoln techs, it could be run on my Northstar 5KW generator. Like I said, just curious on your selection process.

Thanks and good luck.

BTW: Once you buy a welder, you'll never look at "scrap" steel the same way again!

Al
 
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Old 02-02-05, 10:52 PM
kuri77
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Thanks for the good advice Redlight. Good explanation of the advantage of the adjustable voltage. Al, I only picked the 135 over 175 because it's a 115 voltage that I can use in the garage. As far as I know I would have to spend a fair amount to get the garage wired for 220. Think it would be worth it?
 
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Old 02-03-05, 12:17 AM
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here is a thread that i started that might help you out:

http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=189967


here is my thought from that post on voltage:



voltage is your friend. if you have the choice between 120 and 240 volt machines, and you have a 240 or can install a 240 outlet, by all means buy the 240 if it is just going to be sitting in your garage. if you want to move around a bit more and you know you will have access to 120 plugins everywhere get the 120. the higher the voltage the better the machine will run. i have a miller maxstar 200 DX. it can run off of 120 or 240 and i can detect a slight change for the better when running off the higher voltage, almost like it is not starving for power.

buy good electric cables. whether it be for the extension cables to plug it in, or the grounding cables and electrode cables. if the cables are to small you will get voltage drop. voltage drop is when the electricity tries to hard to get through the cable and it loses voltage on its way through it.



another thing that comes into play for somebody looking to buy a welder is cost. according to the lincoln website there is a 200 dollar difference. that could be a lot for you i don't know.

the 175 would be a little better machine if you are working with thicker metals, but from your original post you said you would be working with metals under quarter inch. all depends on what you want to do.

so if you have 230 voltage or can get it, don't need (ever) to move around from place to place like you could with a 120 plug, and have an extra 200 or so, go for the 175+.

glad to help ya out. any more questions drop me a line. later.

rob "redlight"
 
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Old 02-03-05, 09:46 AM
Albin
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Originally Posted by kuri77
Thanks for the good advice Redlight. Good explanation of the advantage of the adjustable voltage. Al, I only picked the 135 over 175 because it's a 115 voltage that I can use in the garage. As far as I know I would have to spend a fair amount to get the garage wired for 220. Think it would be worth it?
As Redlight said, if you're going to stay pretty much in the garage, then 220 is the way to go. Your electrical panel is in the garage, right? If so, it's a piece of cake to get a 220 outlet. If you don't know what you're doing here, hire an electician, but it really shouldn't be too hard.

Keep in mind that what you plan to do with the machine WILL most probably change after you get and start working with it. It's then that you will probably start regretting not getting the 220 machine.

Good luck!

Al
 
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Old 02-03-05, 06:37 PM
kuri77
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Thanks Al, guess I'll have to price the 220 outlet and then decide, Chris
 
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