Practice rod advice ??

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Old 03-03-05, 02:52 PM
LimaBlu
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Practice rod advice ??

Last weekend I spent some time with my older brother who tried to show me how to stick weld on a 220V unit with some old 7018 rods that have perhaps suffered from humidity. He's no professional either This was a humbling experience for me, to say the least.

Now I plan to visit him again over the coming weekend and want to buy some rods. He suggested 7014 or 6013 and there was another one he couldn't remember the number but he's used some speciality rods some time ago that were extremely easy to use and created a blue cord. ??

I'd like advice on what rod to get to practice welding junk metal (approx. 1/8" thick). I want to regain my dignity and have reason to followup with a course.

Thanks
 
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Old 03-04-05, 07:41 AM
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You may want to consult the welding forum as I'm no professional welder. I do alot of welding in my shop with a 40 year old Forney that I wouldn't trade for anything. I use 6013 rod and can run a bead with the best of 'em.
 
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Old 03-05-05, 12:54 AM
diagnosticmonke
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TRY THE 1109, I used alot of that before the MIG

Its A Hoot Man, My Welding Instructor Who Passed Away Many Years Ago, Used To Send Me To The Refridgerater For 1109 Rod All The Time.it Wasnt Until Later That I Found Out It Was Actually 6011 Upside Down.
 
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Old 03-05-05, 04:51 AM
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LimaBlu,

70/anything rods are low hydrogen and do not keep very well.
6013 are likely the easiest to weld with followed by 6011 imo.
Also, I would suggest you try no bigger than 5/32" rods because they take less heat than 1/8" and are less likely to burn through on 1/8" material.

Is this machine you are using a straight ac macine or ac/dc?
 
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Old 03-05-05, 05:13 AM
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Low hydogen rods are capable of making a "pretty" bead but they do not "dig" in. Thats why they are normally used as a filler rod after 6010. I think Gregs finger slipped and he meant 3/32 rod. 6013 is used where there is rust and junk. A nice rod for the purpose. Being a pipe welder, we always welded with reverse polarity. Good luck.
 
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Old 03-05-05, 05:43 AM
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As others have suggested, 6013 as a first choice, 6011 as a second. I recommend 1/8" diameter rod rather than the smaller diameters since the smaller rods are also shorter. Practice with a full length rod.

Technique and machine setting are significant as well. Set the amperage to the upper end of the recommended range for the rod selected - usually 90-115 amps for 1/8" diameter.
Using a dragging technique (rather than pushing) allows you to see more of the puddle.

Reverse polarity on DC will be so much smoother than AC if it is available. Start at a point slightly away from the end of your practice pieces to avoid burn through.
 
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Old 03-05-05, 05:55 AM
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Red face majak, you are right, I goofed!

What I really meant was 2.4 mm (3/32") rather than the two sizes larger 4.0 mm (5/32").

Please note: The following off topic comment is my personal opinion and in no way represents the thoughts, opinion or policy of diy.com.

Thanks to OUR government who in 1977 based in part by an unkept promise by some other neighbourly government to join in, we are still, some nearly thirty years later, a somewhat confusing system.
Us oldtimers who grew up with "standard" measurements are burdened by the fact that our metrication laws of 1977 are not enforceable by the courts and are now left with some mfrs who use two measurement systems others that only use metric. Plus the fact that my trade is primarily US based and uses "standard" specs.................................Aw shucks, sorry!
 
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Old 03-05-05, 07:41 AM
LimaBlu
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First off, l meant to post this thread in the Welding forum but accessed this forum using bookmarks I had set. Anyways, the welding project is geared towards a go-kart project and I'm getting the requested help here

The machine is a straight up AC. From charts I consulted I understand that 6013 rods have a low penetration factor. Is this an issue with 1/8" mild steel for a light offroad go-cart ? Should I be using this rod only for practicing and something else (like 6011) for the actual project assuming I get sufficiently skilled to tackle my project?

Thanks.
 

Last edited by LimaBlu; 03-05-05 at 07:42 AM. Reason: typo
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Old 03-05-05, 07:23 PM
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Practice with what you will use

Go get the 6011 and practice with it. There are other factors which can affect penetration, even with 6011 rod.
Get some 1/8" plate and butt weld it. Clamp the plate on one side into a vise and destructively test the welded joint.
Cut it apart with a saw. You cannot LOOK at a joint to see if it has adequate penetration.

Remember, your welded joints and seams will be subjected to vibration, flexing and shock loads. Which ones can you afford to have separate unexpectedly?
 
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Old 03-05-05, 07:44 PM
LimaBlu
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Will do IBM5081. Thanks for the advice.
 
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