brand new here, so forgive if i repeat..arc or wire..

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Old 03-14-05, 05:33 PM
ron24151
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brand new here, so forgive if i repeat..arc or wire..

Hello, forgive me If I repeat all thats been said and buried. But I would like to build a monster wagon and a ferris wheel (small one, 2 seater), so I would like to buy a welder. what I am looking to weld is hollow square stock, 1/4 inch walls, so should i go w/ stick or wire? I know there are plenty of factors to go over here. but in a nut shell..whats the thickest a wire feed can weld in one/two passes compared to a stick? also 110 vs 220/230 and ac vs ac/dc.. please let me know and thank you for helping.. ron
 
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Old 03-15-05, 01:50 PM
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Mighty thick stock

If you are using square pipe with 1/4" thick walls, better go get a 220V MIG (wire feed). Miller, Lincoln and ESAB can accomodate your requirements.
Go ahead and plan to use solid wire with gas shielding.
Some of the framing for automobile race cars is not 1/4" thick and MIG is preferred.
 
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Old 03-15-05, 07:36 PM
ron24151
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sorry, maybe 1/4 to thick,

maybe its 1/8 sound right/ ok heres what i did, went to buy the lincoln stick, but the man a welder, said that what i wanted to do would be fine w/ a campbell huesfeld iron force 98 wire feed 95935, weld from 18 g to 3/16 its a dc output, and works on 115.. what do you think..is there one comparable to this thats better/ thanks ron
 
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Old 03-15-05, 08:10 PM
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ron,

I really think you should take a step back and do some serious research before you jump into anything.
I would suggest that you go back and carefully read "what's been said and buried".

You also should be carefull who you take advice from, especially when making a purchase decision.
If you had told a "welder" you wanted to "weld 1/4" or even 1/8" material into a project where strength and safety were of great importance and he offered you 120 volt welder, I would seriously question his ability to advise you correctly.

There has been enough said here on choosing welders the last month or so that you should have a failrly good idea what welding is all about.
 
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Old 03-17-05, 03:28 PM
ron24151
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did do//

hello, i read, read and reread these questions over. still confused to a bit. recap here, i am looking for a welder to build a pull wagon and go kart and small ferris wheel for the kids. i would really like to get a stick lincoln 225 ac but cant really do small stock w/ it can i? then a mig is good, but can it do heavy stock if so what thickness? so is 220 better or worth the extra then 110/115 and ac better then dc, is campbell huasfeld 95 115 dc mig any good to do the expected? get both? theres where i am lost please help... ron
 
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Old 03-17-05, 03:51 PM
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ron,

Yes I agree, it can be confusing.

A machine that can do it all is a mig.
The best welding is done with gas but if you were going to be welding outside then you would need to change your wire type to flux core.

If you were going to only be welding sheet metal then you could do well with a 120 volt machine but when you start to weld heavier material then you will have a problem with the duty cycle of a small unit.
You can weld thicker material but you need to make several passes but you will have to wait because some of those machines have less than a 20% duty cycle.
This means that you can weld for two minutes but have to wait 8 minutes for the machine to cool off.
Plus, when welding heavier critical welds, sometimes multiple passes don't give you as much strength as a single deeper pass.

What I'm saying I guess is to bypass the cheaper machines and get a 220 volt mig that can weld bigger material.
You can turn down a big machine to weld as thin a material as you like.

Also, in my opinion a consumer type machine is not as good an investment as a major name like Miller or Hobart.
 
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Old 03-17-05, 04:42 PM
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Miller or Lincoln

Go look at the Millermatic 210 or the Lincoln PowerMig 215. They are similar in price and will do everything that you want and more. Run gas or fluxcore in either one.

The original request was to buy a welder. Either one of these will do. Get the safety equipment, autodarkening helmet and consumables.

It would be very profitable to take a few welding classes or have a professional available to correct your mistakes as you learn.

I have a small Lincoln and a large Miller unit.
 
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Old 03-18-05, 08:14 AM
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i would have to recomend the millermatic 210 just got one and so far luv it
it is right in the middle of the miller matic line. i stareted with a clark 100e it worked fine but the duty cycle was limiting and consumables where not as readily found as the miller and lincoln.the cost is up there for the biger better welders but if you take care of it it will hold its value well.it sounds like you have somegood projects to tackle and am willing to bet if you go small and cheap you will either give up or will be looking to buy another welder. save the time and extra expense and get the bigger better machine from the start
you will not regret it. do you have any experience welding?if not i would take a class or find some one to help you try it before you buy a welder and just try it.
 
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Old 03-18-05, 08:33 AM
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Classes are not just for learning

The OP said that he wanted to buy a welder. What he did not realize is that a welding class will actually make him a smarter shopper for whatever welder he purchases. He will also learn how to weld and correct mistakes.
Most welding classes are conducted using a variety of metalworking equipment: Oxyacetylene, Stick, MIG, plasma cutters, abrasive saws, shears, drills, benders and punches. Kinda like try-before-you-buy.

Now it IS possible to go get a name-brand 220V MIG welder to learn on. Might be a little more costly to buy new when a used unit in good condition would work as well. But there was no mention of "cheap" originally, so he must be ready to spend around $2000+ for a welding setup. He can always learn later, plus, if he's got a buddy who knows how to weld, the projects can start as soon as the equipment is ready. New equipment is also the way to go if you want to learn how to weld, but don't want to have to learn how to repair the welder. A new machine warranty does have value at that point, although the name-brands are usually very durable.

It's much more difficult to advise someone who wants to spend $50 on a cheap 110V welder so they can go build an airplane or a race car. Let the spark-making begin.
 
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Old 03-18-05, 10:00 AM
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My impression is ron doesn't want to spend $2K on a welder. I like the idea of getting a used buzzbox (ac stick) at a pawn shop or garage sale, flea mkt. I agree that the choices are lincoln, miller, and hobart (although my sears 230A does great-must be made by one of them). For doing smaller guage I have a lincoln 100 (120v) and have had cheap migs that were bad. I don't know if the cheaper ones work well now but I wouldn't trust that they do. As a hobby welder if the Duty cycle isn't long it doesn't matter as much as being able to get the job done. You want a 100% duty cycle if your making money with it ( otherwise you are waiting for the welder to cool off). By the way my 110v lincoln will turn 1/8" stock red hot with flux core. Its also handy when I'm welding up wrought iron at a customers house (handyman work).
 
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