Need (Soldering) Advice

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-14-05, 05:58 PM
stephie
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question Need (Soldering) Advice

Hello Everyone!
I'm really excited about my future venture. I've started my own business. This is something that has taken me over three years to accomplish, and I'm not stopping now. I make my own jewelry and sell it at craft shows. I'm presently making pierced earrings and want to use the Cold Heat Solder tool to solder all openings that are metal. (ie jumprings) Ive already purchased it, but don't know what size solder to get (.031 ?), from whom, do I need flux, and what does pickling mean? Is there solder and flux combined that I can use, eliminating one step?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-15-05, 09:59 AM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Mountain Williams Missouri
Posts: 18,386
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Wink

Try for some 40/60 Rosin Core solder and see how that will work for you. Also for a paste flux I like Nokorode Solder Paste. Are do you have to work with a silver bearing solder.


ED
 
  #3  
Old 04-15-05, 03:16 PM
stephie
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Talking Very Appreciative, but still need help.

undefinedI am grateful so far for your website, and all of the advise- but I am a novice and I don't understand half of what has been said. But as I said before; and as you say, you learn from past mistakes.
Please bear with me. I have already purchased the ColdHeat Soldering Tool. Could 40/60 Resin Core still be used? Where do you suggest that I purchase that? On past reading, am I correct in assuming that pickling is dipping the soldered piece in water for a few seconds?

Creations by Stephie
 
  #4  
Old 04-15-05, 09:15 PM
IBM5081's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 655
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Neat tool

Some background first: perform a Google search for
"metal pickling". What you will learn is that pickling involves immersing a metal in an acid bath, typically to remove oxides and other junk that might impair the strength of a soldered joint between two metal parts. It will leave the metal with a dull finish.

I examined the web site for the tool - www.coldheat.com.
It appears that the tool feeds solder material down the middle of the tip, so it would need to be a fairly small diameter solder. Perhaps the owner's manual that came with the device would suggest a type and size.

There are two basic types of soft solder. Rosin core is used for electrical work and leaves a rosin residue that should be removed, probably with just hot water. It is not corrosive.
Acid core or acid flux solder is the other type. Acid-core has the flux in the core of the solder. Acid-flux is used with solid wire solder and is applied externally to the joint. Acid fluxed solder makes a bit stronger joint and must be cleaned well to avoid leaving acid to cause corrosion of the metal. Immersing in hot water and scrubbing well should remove most of it.

As far as solder suppliers, normal hobby shops and home centers will not likely carry what you need. Performing a Google search for "jewelry solder" yields many results, among them http://www.rings-things.com/solder.htm that can supply solder appropriate to the type of jewelry that you desire to create.
 
  #5  
Old 04-21-05, 12:47 PM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 10,134
Received 37 Votes on 35 Posts
stephie,

I too had never heard of a coldheat soldering tool and by reading the description for it, the tip does not heat untill you short out the two halves of the tip to complete a circuit.
This would work well where what you are soldering can physically do this.
You might want to invest in a more traditional soldering iron.

Resin core solder would work on clean metal but the resulting finish will get dull due to the lead content in the solder.

As has been suggested, you should look for solder specifically for jewellery that has a silver content to it.
This solder will keep its shine.
Also, where jewellery is made that will be in close contact with the skin you would not want the lead from resin core to rub off.
 
  #6  
Old 04-24-05, 10:42 AM
L
Member
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 14
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Stephie,
If you are going to solder silver jewelry, you will not be able to use a cold solder tool. You will have to use a torch.
For small jump rings and other small soldering jobs you can use a small pencil torch like a benzomatic butane torch. You can use silver solder sheet or wire with this torch. Flux the piece with a silver flux like handy flux or ultra flux then place a snippet of wire or sheet at the solder point with a titanium pick then heat. Always heat the item to be soldered, the solder will melt and run toward the heat. After soldering is complete, you will need to pickle the item in a warm pickle bath. You can use vinegar though it is very slow. A lot of people use pH down (pool or aquarium supply).
Remember that you cannot sell any silver item as sterling or fine silver if it has been soldered using a base metal.
Liz
 
  #7  
Old 04-24-05, 12:50 PM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 10,134
Received 37 Votes on 35 Posts
Thumbs up Thanks for helping out.

Liz,

As you can tell we are a bit jewelery challenged.
A lot of what I solder takes two hands to lift.
 
  #8  
Old 04-25-05, 05:31 AM
tim_rorer
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
wow

fascinating!!!! I don't play to make jewelry but I didn't realize there was soldering beyond pipe sweating and soldering wiring for vehicles and electronics!!! Heck-I might try to make the "old lady" something sometime--Where do I purchase the basic materials--(Hobby-Lobby-maybe?)

Tim
 
  #9  
Old 04-25-05, 08:00 AM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 10,134
Received 37 Votes on 35 Posts
Come to think of it, I do use silver solder quite a bit on copper/brass, copper/steel, brass to steel fitting joints but I never thought to use it for something tiny.
Not sure if my Sta-Brite 45 has the same melting point as silver used for jewellery but I have a tiny little oxy-actylene handle and tip somewhere in my stuff I could try it with.

Just what I need though, another project.
 
  #10  
Old 04-25-05, 09:00 AM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Mountain Williams Missouri
Posts: 18,386
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thumbs up

tim_rorer Hey if you want to play with solder dont forget the stain glass windows. lots to solder there also.

ED
 
  #11  
Old 04-25-05, 12:45 PM
tim_rorer
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
me and stained glass....

I tried "fake stain glass"(the paint and stick on leading to separate the colors) but at the time, I thought it'll be a great family project--boy was I wrong!!! It seems like you could do great things (cheating or real stainglass) but don't include teenagers!!!!!!

Tim
 
  #12  
Old 04-30-05, 02:53 AM
L
Member
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 14
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
to get the basic materials for soldering fine metals (i.e. silver) you can get a pencil torch and flux at Home Depot or local hardware store. Silver wire and sheet can be obtained from a local jewelry supply or an online supplier like Rio Grande or Hagstogz (sp?). Copper can be soldered the same way as silver and you can get most of that at the hardware store, just make sure any solder you use does not contain lead.
If you guys aren't ready to tackle jewelry these same methods can be used to make fun things like candlabras, home-made light fixtures, and other creative stuff.
One of my friends said that he learned to make jewelry and goodies for his wife in self-defense.
Liz
 
  #13  
Old 05-05-05, 06:19 PM
h nu
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I would not use leaded solder for anything unless you take the precautions to deal with lead's high vapor pressure. (Like wear a 100% Particulate Mask or respirator designed for lead. You can say its only once or twice all you want, but if lead is oxidized in your body, it will stay in your body forever. It has been known to cause reproductive harm and cancer of digestive and respiratory systems. A lot of people will tell you this is hogwash, or that they do it all the time, and their just fine etc. But its really up to the user.

In place of lead solder, you can use a tin-silver(has higher% tin with silver) solder or silver solder (which is higher silver than tin).(just make sure it doesnt contain Cadmium, as many cheap silver solders do. It also has a high vapor pressure, and will readily fume with low heat. Cd ions also do bad things to your body).

Sadly your coldheat tool will not work with silver solder. I bought one(Coldheat) for electronics, and it works, but only with very small diameter wire and solder that has a lower Melting point than the silver solder I have. It doesnt generate that much heat from the little 1.5 volt bats. considering you need to heat the entire pool of solder through whatever you put in contact with the electrodes.

For silver solder (with silver solder flux) a mini-torch (say $10-15) will work great.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: