What to use to cut trailer house frame?

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Old 09-10-05, 01:29 AM
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What to use to cut trailer house frame?

I had a old trailer house that burned and all that's left is the frame it sat on. I dont have wheels on it so this thing is sitting on the ground and I want to cut it into sections so I can load them and take and sell for scrap. This is a one time deal so I dont want to spend a lot of money for a torch or whetever I can use to do this with. Any sugestions would be apreciated.

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Jim123
 
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Old 09-10-05, 02:16 AM
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A good hacksaw.
Get an abrasive cut off wheel made for cutting metal, for your circular saw.
The sparks from the cutting can/will start a fire.
Use safety glasses.
 
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Old 09-10-05, 04:16 AM
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Thanks GWIZ.
 
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Old 09-10-05, 07:39 AM
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You could rent a reciprocating saw (Sawzall) and you buy the blade(s). No sparks to worry about. Good luck.
 
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Old 09-10-05, 06:18 PM
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I have a sawzall. Got a barn full of tools and saws just no torch and someone stole my Hobart 4500 last month. Never done much with metal and iron and didnt realize they made blades for skill saws and sawzalls that would cut metal and iron. This frame is pretty thick. Any one blade or wheel better than the others?

Jim123
 
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Old 09-11-05, 02:28 AM
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I purchased some cheap wheels made for cutting metal, I think most will work.
You want to get a wheel that is labeled reinforced, I think they add fiber glass to help prevent it from flying apart,
and check the RPM rating of the wheel and your saw's RPM.

-----------------------------------------------------------------
I got good use with Milwaukee blades.
Super sawzall BI/Metal
24 TPI for sheet metal.
18 TPI for 1/8" metal tubing.

The general rule is to have a minimum of three teeth engaged in the work at all times.
Any less you may break the teeth off the blade.
Use a slower speed if you can, if you over heat the blade it will get soft.
 
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Old 09-11-05, 07:36 PM
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Originally Posted by jim123
I have a sawzall. Got a barn full of tools and saws just no torch and someone stole my Hobart 4500 last month. Never done much with metal and iron and didnt realize they made blades for skill saws and sawzalls that would cut metal and iron. This frame is pretty thick. Any one blade or wheel better than the others?

Jim123
Abrasive blades in a circular saw will work, but it isn't good for the tool, and those sparks...

Carbide blades specifically for cutting metal work well, but just like wood, there will be little pieces of metal thrown about. And it is very loud when cutting. Proper eye and ear protection is a must. There are specific blades for ferrous (steel/iron) and non-ferrous (aluminum) materials. Do not use a wood cutting blade.

The power of your saw will be the limiting factor when cutting. The carbide tipped blades take less power to turn and cut than the abrasive kind.

The Sawzall is a mighty useful tool. For a one time shot, it is a reasonable alternative. The Lenox "demolition" blades are a good choice. Thick, like over 3/16, metal could take a while to cut.

If you can rent/borrow one, a portable bandsaw would do a faster job than the Sawzall.
 
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Old 09-15-05, 01:56 AM
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i would rent a torch. how thick are these beams?? from what i have seen they are pretty beefy. have you considered keeping the thing intact and selling the beams to somebody that needs them. thick i beams are pricey.
 
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