ATD 155 mig welder IS IT WORTH BUYING

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Old 09-19-05, 11:49 PM
crafty787
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ATD 155 mig welder IS IT WORTH BUYING

ATD 155 230v mig welder is it worth buying. Or are they just junk like the harbor fright pice of crap that I had. Any info good or bad would be apricated. That spelling don't look right! thanks Crafty
 
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Old 09-22-05, 04:55 AM
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All I have ever seen in welding shops are Miller, Lincoln or Hobart mig units. I guess the guys that use them all the time don't want any other brand. I have a Miller 175 mig that I've run 20 lbs of .024 wire thru and it has performed flawlessly. I think migs are like most other things, you gets what you pays for.
Mike
 
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Old 09-22-05, 06:52 AM
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I looked at the ATD website and they look like they have a similar collection of tools as what HF have.

I buy inexpensive import tools often but wouldn't buy something as long term as a welder from a place like that.
One of the biggest things I feel is parts availability.
You will regularly need consumeables and parts for your welder which is something these places do not usually keep in stock, and if they do there is no guarantee they will have it in two years when you need it.
Not to mention the lower duty cycles these units have.
When you are researching what welder to buy, duty cycle is what is very important.
It is the number of minutes in a ten minute period you can weld.
A lot of makers rate the maximum output at around a 20% duty cycle, but I have seen imports rated at 10%!
This means that if you have the machine turned up to the highest setting you can weld for 2 minutes then must let the machine cool for eight.
The duty cycle changes with your settings though.
Not sure if this is accurate but as an example if you have a 20% duty cycle at maximum output, the duty cycle may increase to 50% at half power.
This is why you would choose a larger welder. To allow yourself to operate for the maximun amount of time at the setting you normally use.
I have an older MM150 that I can operate at 50% output nearly continuously, which is the aproximate setting mine takes to weld 1/8" material.

Miller, Lincoln and Hobart are three machines you wouldn't go wrong buying.
(I happen to like blue.)
 
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Old 09-25-05, 06:58 PM
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Originally Posted by GregH
I looked at the ATD website and they look like they have a similar collection of tools as what HF have.

I buy inexpensive import tools often but wouldn't buy something as long term as a welder from a place like that.
One of the biggest things I feel is parts availability.
You will regularly need consumeables and parts for your welder which is something these places do not usually keep in stock, and if they do there is no guarantee they will have it in two years when you need it.
Not to mention the lower duty cycles these units have.
When you are researching what welder to buy, duty cycle is what is very important.
It is the number of minutes in a ten minute period you can weld.
A lot of makers rate the maximum output at around a 20% duty cycle, but I have seen imports rated at 10%!
This means that if you have the machine turned up to the highest setting you can weld for 2 minutes then must let the machine cool for eight.
The duty cycle changes with your settings though.
Not sure if this is accurate but as an example if you have a 20% duty cycle at maximum output, the duty cycle may increase to 50% at half power.
This is why you would choose a larger welder. To allow yourself to operate for the maximun amount of time at the setting you normally use.
I have an older MM150 that I can operate at 50% output nearly continuously, which is the aproximate setting mine takes to weld 1/8" material.

Miller, Lincoln and Hobart are three machines you wouldn't go wrong buying.
(I happen to like blue.)
What is a good price range to set for your self? I wont be welding for LONG periods of time. Mostly small things, I would say the thickest penetration i would be doing is 1/2" most likely alot less.

Is it okay to buy an ac/dc welder so that i dont have to buy two units? or is the extra space and money worth two seperate items?

Can a mig welder be converter to a tig welder? can a wire feed welder be covert to a non wrie feed welder . (sorry i dont ahve a good welding vocab.)
 
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Old 09-25-05, 08:54 PM
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There are two schools of thought:

1. Go buy a welder, then figure out what to do with it.
2. Go take a welding class, then buy the welder that you need.

Here's one recommendation from the first school:
Go buy a Millermatic 210, all the safety gear, shielding gas and wire. Have an electrician install a 60 amp 220 volt circuit for you. Budget about $2000 for this setup.
Then go take a class on how to use a MIG welder.
You will be all set to weld almost any mild steel and the learning curve is fairly reasonable.

You won't need to learn TIG since you won't be doing aluminum or stainless steel. You won't need to learn stick welding since the MIG will do almost anything that you need to do.
 
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