135 AMPs mig

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Old 09-20-05, 06:58 PM
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135 AMPs mig

I am looking into either a MILLER or LINCOLN 135, both are simalar in price and performance, using 20 amps 110v outlet, except Miller do 3/16 mild steel and Lincoln do 5/16 mild steel, how true/accutrate is the rating, that's quite a bit of difference, 1/8 of an inch difference.
 
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Old 09-20-05, 07:52 PM
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CBR900RR,

Both welders may say they are 135 amp capacity but they do not tell you up front at what duty cycle.
Duty cycle is what it is all about.
You should be able to find the duty cycle for each machine.
It could be a number like 135 amps at 20% duty cycle.
This means that you can weld for 2 minutes in a 10 min period.
 
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Old 09-20-05, 07:57 PM
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Duty cycle is same on both 90amp/ 18v/20%, both have infinte voltage adj, but one will do 3/16 and the other 5/16 with mutiple pass. I am leaning toward more on the miller, anybody have any suggestion or experience with small 110v welder?
 
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Old 09-21-05, 05:15 AM
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I have had the Lincoln SP100 for quite some time. I have only used flux-core wire in it since it's used outdoors typically. Flux-core runs a little hotter since there's no shielding gas to cool it off. Single pass is all that I have ever done and 1/8" (or less) thickness mild steel. The 110 volt MIG typically does light guage square tubing very nicely with few burn-throughs. My machine is sensitive to adequate power. I try to plug into a washing machine outlet (dedicated circuit) with the shortest 12 guage extension cord possible when working at someone else's house.
For thicker material (1/8" and up) I have a 200 amp stick welder. If you intend to use material in this range and only want to buy a single machine, I recommend that you consider the 220 volt MIGs from Miller or Lincoln as they can be dialed down for the lighter guage work.
 
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Old 09-21-05, 02:47 PM
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Thanks everybody.
 
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Old 09-23-05, 11:20 PM
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The differences in "material thicknesses" are simply different approaches to advertising. Miller is a little more realisitic. In full reality, in the GMAW (MIG) process, the machines do 1/8" well. Any more is going to require edge preparation and experience and maybe multiple passes for 100% penetration, which isn't always needed, though.

You can change that to about 3/16" with the same machines using the FCAW (Flux-cored) process.

I've used a few of the Lincoln 135s. I currently have an old Miller MM130, and MM175 for my small MIGs. Miller has the edge in my book, BIG TIME, after the times I've had to deal with both companies' customer service.

For a better price, look at the Hobart HH140. Extremely similar to the Miller, and from the same parent company, but not blue, and a bit cheaper, too.

You can get reconditioned or new units at places like www.toolking.com
 
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Old 09-24-05, 05:27 PM
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Thanks , very helpful info.
 
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Old 09-28-05, 07:43 PM
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I've had a Hobart 135 for about a year and a half now, no issues so far. In Canada the MM 135 is about $150 more than the HH 140. Off the top of my head the difference is the MM 135 has all metal drive gear, infinite voltage dial instead of tapped setting, and a light to indicate your over the duty-cycle limit. Is it worth the $150 extra...depends on who you talk too, for my hobbist use at home, no.

I Installed a 20AMP circuit in my garage. I ran 0.030 flux-core for the first few months then I switched to 0.035. A slight difference on the high end which provides 1/4" in a single pass no problem. Tap 4 (max) and Wire Speed at 50
 
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Old 09-28-05, 09:49 PM
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Thanks, instead of the MM135, I just order the MM175 from ebay, hopefully get it by Monday.

This is what I order

Millermatic 175-----$666.77

Miller Helmet-216321-----$236.87

Helmet protective outside lens-216326-----$16.00

Welding Machine cover-195149-----$34.87

Solid wire
.023-11#-----$22.00
.030-11#-----$18.59
.035-11#-----$17.93

Consumable Kit-193973-----$24.50

Plus $136 shipping to Hawaii.
 
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Old 09-28-05, 10:02 PM
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Nice! If I had a need for that power at home the MM 175 or 210 would be my choice too. I use a MM 251 all day at work so if I need the power I take my project there
 
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Old 09-28-05, 10:33 PM
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Thanks METALFAB, I had post another question on the electric forum see if you can help.

http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=233847
 
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Old 09-29-05, 02:58 PM
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Excellent choice. You will not be disappointed. I loved my MM175. You will probably find through experience that that machine does very well with .035" wire for most applications, and just keep some .023" for really light stuff. That will prevent you from needing to have all three sizes in stock plus the tips.

Will you be running C-25 gas with it?
 
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Old 09-29-05, 11:07 PM
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Yes, just pick up c25 tank for $100 and gas for $40, 50 cubic feet.
 
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Old 10-02-05, 01:29 AM
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From your other post in electrical.

What no gloves ?

Don't weld without gloves,
The UV light will burn any exposed skin in a short time.

I burnt the skin on my trigger hand in less then 20 minutes of practicing when I first started with a mig, my neck was also red.
I did not feel any heat from the gun but my hand and arm was red. I think the skin came off a day or two later.

Then you will need about 20 C-clamps to keep things square.
The magnets don't work.

A chop saw.
4-1/2" 90 deg. hand grinder.
An aluminum welding kit.
A second bottle with 100% argon for aluminum.

By that time it will be Christmas.
 
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Old 10-02-05, 07:19 AM
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I got all those with nomex coverall, air compressor, all my air tool are double up, might need to buy some vise grip.
 
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