Cutting sheet metal

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  #1  
Old 10-01-05, 06:45 PM
Grantk
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Cutting sheet metal

I'm dismantling an old Doughboy pool, and am looking for ideas on what to use to cut the sheel metal "surround". I'm guessing it is probably 6 ga steel. I was think of a right angle grinder. I'm not into a cutting torch as I probably don't have any other uses for it, and don't know how to operate a torch. Any suggestions?
 
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Old 10-01-05, 09:36 PM
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6-gauge seems REALLY big. That's more than 5/32", over 4mm. I remember a Doughboy when I was a kid, seemed really thin then...

I've got to assume it's way smaller than that. I think it's plenty small for a hand held pair of tin snips, isn't it? Of course, I'd grab my 18V DeWalt shear, assuming it was 18-gauge or less.

If you meant 16-gauge (and even that seems too thick for memory), I'd go with a metal-cutting carbide blade in a circular saw, with appropriate safety clothing, of course. A jig saw or sawzall would work more slowly, but perhaps with less intimidation.

Also, it really depends on how many cuts of what length is involved. And, these ideas are already with my plasma torch tied behind my back, too...

Before speculating further, can you verify the thickness for us?
 

Last edited by MAC702; 10-01-05 at 09:47 PM.
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Old 10-01-05, 10:11 PM
Grantk
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How do I determine the gauge with the normal tools found in a home workshop? I may be way off base with my WAG of 6 gauge. This is a large Doughboy, with a permeter length of about 80 feet. I'm in California, and its about 9:15 PM, but the pool is about 25 feet long and 15 feet wide. I want to cut into pickup ize pieces so I can take it to the landfill.
 
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Old 10-01-05, 10:40 PM
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Compare it to the thickness of a penny.
Is it half the thickness of a penny or is it 4 pennies thick ?
 
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Old 10-01-05, 10:45 PM
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It's late here, so I may be too tired to think of better methods, but here are some ideas to try. Do you have feeler gauges? How about a micrometer or calipers (either dial or venier?)

How about stacking sheets of plain copier paper until they feel the same thickness as the steel? The edges might have that scallop on them that complicates matters, if I remember correctly.

If I picture what I think I remember, you're talking smaller than 20-gauge. Have to TRIED tin snips to check for their feasability? Their biggest drawback is they become a real PAIN when making long cuts.

An electric shear is probably going to be the best way to go if you have to buy a new tool, but what other power tools do you have at your disposal, other than the angle grinder (one of my last choices, but can work)?
 
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Old 10-02-05, 08:42 AM
Grantk
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Thickness

I checked and the sheet metal is the same thickness of a new penny. What gauge is that equivalent to?

Most of my existing tools are your typical homeowner type. I do have a 6 1/2 inch skilsaw, and a saber saw. I thought abought getting a carbide blade for the skilsaw, but thought I'd ask for advice first. The sheet metal wall is about 42 inches high and currently in a vertical orientation, although I can lay it down in a flat position. I need to make about 10 cuts to get into pieces that I can get in the back of a pickup.

What else can I tell you?
 
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Old 10-02-05, 08:48 AM
Grantk
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Cutting sheet metal

I also don't mind buying a sawzall or another simialr tool that I can use for other projects. An electric shear is probably not a tool that I'd have much other use for.
 
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Old 10-02-05, 02:19 PM
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Penny is about 16 ga.


This link should answer your question and more.
http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=231195
 
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Old 10-02-05, 03:24 PM
Grantk
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Cutting sheet metal

OK, I'll go with the 16 gauge. What's your recommendation as to how to cut it up, a skilsaw with an abrasive blade or a sawzall, or?
 
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Old 10-02-05, 07:28 PM
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Abrasive blade

Assuming that you already have a circular saw, I would try a metal-cutting abrasive blade first. They are not that expensive, cheaper in a multi-blade pack. You WILL need to take care to handle the spark stream that is generated. I recommend cutting in the flat position with a 2x4 under the metal to the left and right of the cut. Eye and ear protection of course, as well as fire protection. Do NOT let the spark stream point toward glass or automotive painted surfaces.
 
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Old 10-03-05, 04:02 PM
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umm... I don't know about the Dougboy brand, but I did take down a rather large above-ground pool once. The sheet material and posts were aluminum. I would just get a saw-all (reciprocating saw) <- However you spell that... No mess, no problems and it's a useful tool around the house for MANY purposes. It will allow you to cut any of the bolts that are rusted, etc... You can get blades for all types of materials.

Good luck!
 
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Old 10-14-05, 08:53 PM
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If you can get your hands on a plasma cutter it will make quick work of it...
 
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