120 or 240 volts


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Old 03-26-06, 09:35 PM
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120 or 240 volts

Hey everybody, new on this board...

I've read a ton of threads, and also the sticky, but I'm still very unclear.

I have no experience welding, but I'd like to get in to it. Not hardcore, just little stuff. I have an old VW dune buggy, that needs floor pan replacing badly (rusted out). Originally I was going to just pay someone to do it for me, but I've done everything else on my buggy, and I'd like to keep it that way. Makes me appreciate my baby much more!

So I'm looking at getting a cheap MIG, my only question is would 120 volts be ok for doing things like floor pans and other small stuff? Or do I need to go with the higher voltage?

I was looking at something like this:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/produ...0&tab=des#tabs

Its cheap, but its Craftsman so I would trust it.

Also, it just says "wire-feed", I'm assuming its still MIG, no?
 
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Old 03-28-06, 06:42 PM
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Hi,
Replacing floor pans is the dirtyiest, messiest job that you could ever take on while working on a car. It would cost thousands for you to get someone to do a good job and even more if they did a bad job.
That craftsman puts out about 80amps so don't think of doing anything thicker than 3/16 inch, but thin sheet metal like 18 ga. the craftsman should do fine. It is only designed for use with flux core wire, NOT A MIG, which means that you can't use a shieling gas with a solid wire. The thinest metal i've ever welded was 22ga. with 0.030 flux core in my lincoln sp135 plus . MIG is definatly the best for sheet metal but flux core will do. If you plan on doing a bit of welding here and there, i suggest that you pay the extra $200 or so and buy a lincoln sp135 for $450 and then you could buy a tank of argon/co2 and you could do almost anything with it. plus that machine could last you years, while the cheap craftsman may only last a couple of years.

Hope that helps,
Charles
CHUCKS KUZTOMS

I suggest this welder, you can get on cheaper at a "true" welding store
http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/produ...id=00920587000
 
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Old 03-28-06, 06:44 PM
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Also take a look at the Hobart welders, excellent quality at a great price
 
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Old 03-30-06, 04:55 AM
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One thing to consider when choosing between gas or no gas.

Flux core wire would be fine for floorboards or any other hidden sheet metal.
If welding visible body panels however, flux core wire tends to put more heat onto the metal which will tend to distort more than when using shilelding gas

Also, a 120 volt unit will be just fine for sheet metal but if you think you might advance to larger projects you might find the available welding power quite limiting.
 
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Old 03-30-06, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Twizzstyle
I have no experience welding, but I'd like to get in to it. Not hardcore, just little stuff.


I would suggest starting out with a cheaper unit. Top of the line model would be easier to learn with but unless you got money to burn IMO it makes more sense to start out small. Once you have learned on a cheaper unit you can step back and evaluate your needs [and wants] and wisely spend your money on the next one.

My first welder was an UK 110 volt stick welder I bought 20 yrs ago for $75, although I seldom use it now [have nice 220 volt] it still works and is portable if I need to use it eslewhere. Although the cheaper units won't hold up under commercial conditions I believe they are fine for the hobbyist.
 
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Old 03-30-06, 06:14 PM
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Awesome, thanks for the replies guys!

I decided to go ahead and get that Craftsman, mainly because the price was so good.

I only had a chance to play around with it a little bit tonight before coming to work, but was very pleased with the results. For having almost no experience, I was able to get fairly clean and very solid welds.

The floor pans I'm replacing are on my Dune Buggy. The pan is from a 1963 VW Beetle, so its just sheet metal basically. And like you said, I could care less about appearance, as all of the welds will be covered up anyways. They just have to be solid.

This welder is exactly what I wanted, its nice and small, and appears like its going to work exactly what I need it for!

Thanks again!
 
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Old 03-31-06, 12:09 PM
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thats great,
if you get a chance, post some pics of the welds, with photobucket or something like that

Charles
CHUCKS KUZTOMS
 
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Old 04-01-06, 01:07 AM
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I definately will tomorrow. I'm gonna go get some scraps to play with, and I'll post up how I'm doing!
 
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Old 04-24-06, 04:10 PM
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Hobart 125

I have a Hobart Handler 125. When I first used this welder I was dissapointed to say the least. Had alot of problems with the electrode sputtering. Then I came to a forum like this and got the answer. I was using an extension cord that didn't rate the power I needed. I ran 8 gauge wire down to my barn with a 30 amp single pole breaker and now I am impressed by this little welder. As far as duty cycle goes how about running a 16 inch bead non stop at 125 amps with no cutoff? If I need to welder heavier material I use the flux core option and run multiple passes with a good root pass. For the thinner stuff I use solid wire, but be warned, any wind at all will make welding with gas difficult. The reason I don't run 220 down to my barn is it is 150 feet and the wire alone would be over $200.00. I am thinking about a stick welder. I like the Miller Maxstar 150 S but am looking at more afordable options. Another thing that helps is if you can take a night course at your local Tech College. The course cost me $95.00 and I would have burned that up in rods so it was well worth it.
 
 

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