Hobart 210 vs Lincoln Electric 215


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Old 04-19-06, 09:04 PM
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Hobart 210 vs Lincoln Electric 215

I've looking at buying my first mig machine, as a hobbiest, for automotive and trike type projects. Per specs on paper I think the LE 215 beats the 210: can output up to 250 amps, 15 foot gun. Neither have a purge button, at a grand plus I would expect it. A local retailer has the 210 on sale at about $330 less than the LE 215. Has anyone used both of these? Do you think one performs better or is more reliable??

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dmend
 
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Old 04-20-06, 06:46 AM
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Have you already visited any custom shops who use this type of equipment regularly? I find that I usually discover other factors involved in such a purchase by talking with someone who has actually done the type of work that I am considering.
I cannot imagine that you will need anywhere near the full 200+ amp capacity of either machine for a trike or automotive project. There are distortion and HAZ considerations that increase with amperage. What is the maximum metal thickness and wire diameter that would be used in your projects?
 
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Old 04-20-06, 01:52 PM
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Checking out some local shops is a good idea.

My first project involves 5/16" and 3/16". Future projects shouldn't go over 3/16" I expect. I'd like to do it with solid wire and gas to get the penetration and avoid the smoke and slag of gasless wire.

I like the Lincoln Electric 175-Plus, because it doesn't have taps, and on paper it can handle 3/16". But welding 5/16" is probably unsafe. Although, I expect to do multiple passes anyway. With proper joint preparation/beveling I'm thinking it can be done.

A concern is if the Hobart 180 isn't good for over 1/8", per comments from another thread. Any thoughts on if the LE 175-Plus could handle the job?

I found out today that Miller owns Hobart.

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dmend
 
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Old 04-20-06, 08:11 PM
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How about a Millermatic® 251. 42 amps single phase 220V power. Welds to 1/2" in a single pass. Might need to dial it down for that 5/16" material.
 
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Old 04-21-06, 11:24 AM
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The 251 is not affordable. I think one way around this is by changing one of my pieces that is 5/16" to 3/16" or less. That way I am welding 3/16 to 5/16 at all of my weld points. You always set your amps to the thinner metal is my understanding.

Untill I find out differently I am presuming the Lincoln electric 175 can handle the job. On paper it says it can....but in real life????

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dmend
 
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Old 04-21-06, 01:07 PM
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Setting the amperage for the thinner metal. I have never heard of that. Directing more heat toward the thicker piece, yes.

If the power is set for the thinner plate, how will adequate penetration be achieved on the thicker plate? I see a risk of cold lap. Looks nice but is just laying on the surface of the thicker plate without sufficient penetration.

There are several techniques to reduce burn-through on the thinner plate, but dialing down to the thinner plate was not one of them. Do you intend to bevel the thicker plate such that the joint consists of similar thickness?
 
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Old 04-21-06, 01:44 PM
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I have missunderstdd that operation. Thanks for clarifying it. On one end of the project beveling is possible. On the other end the thinner metal butts up to the thicker, i.e., Tee Joint (square tube end to the flat side of angle iron). I also understand preheating the thicker metal is an option, though I think that still leaves alot of guess work in the results.

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dmend
 
 

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