SIP weldmate 100 arc welder help


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Old 05-06-06, 08:57 PM
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SIP weldmate 100 arc welder help

i have been given an SIP weldmate 100 arc welder and i cant figure out if it is an ac or dc current. sounds silly but im a newbie and need info. any would help -mike
 
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Old 05-06-06, 10:10 PM
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Assuming its about 70 to 100 amp output.
If its a stick welder with a heavy transformer the output is more then likely AC.
If its a light weight inverter stick welder its DC output.

If its a wire feed welder its DC output.

If your getting a wire welder get one with at least 4 heat settings.
 
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Old 05-07-06, 07:41 AM
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Mike,

Is this what your welder looks like?

Click image to see more welders:

Image credit: farmcare.com

The one shown is an AC welder but is the 160 model. They likely don't make the 100 model anymore.
Your welder would do well with 1/16" rods. 6013 would be a good type to start out with.
This unit will be good for thin material.
Keep in mind that the links I gave are Australian and the input voltage may be different than yours.
Also, make sure it has the proper electrical approvals to be allowed to be used where you are.
In Canada we often see imported items that do not have our required approvals.


I own a welder that I bought at a garage sale for $30.00 that looks exactly like the one pictured above, is 120 volt power supply and rated at 70 amps.
I have used it a couple of times, once to weld the handle on a tiller at a friend's place, where it did a pretty good job.
I will say though that the very low power and instability of this type of machine makes it tricky to strike and maintain a steady arc even with the bit of experience I have with welding.
Maybe yours with a bit more power than mine would be easier.


Here is another similar model number but adding trade to the model name you gave makes it a mig welder.

Click image:

Image credit: mygarden.net

Any questions just ask.
 
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Old 05-08-06, 10:59 AM
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thanks a bunch for the reply and info greg. my welder is just like the one pictured at the top of your thread. except that mine is red and not black. it has the same stick holder like that one though. i'm not sure what you mean by inverted stick. so you think mine is an ac welder? is that good ar bad? what type is better. i've heard that dc welders are easier to get a steady arc with.
i have been practicing over the weekend and have realized just what you say in your reply. it works well with the 1/16" rods, and i can strike up an arc fairly easily, espessialy when it is hot. however the suggested amp range for that rod says 25-55 but if i use it at that low range it just melts the rod and leaves a round bumpy puddle of molted rod and no penetration. but if i crank u[ the juice to 80-100 then i get easier arc start and much better penetration, and bead. by the way this is while practicing on +/- 1/4" steel. i assume that if i try this high amperage on thinner material it would just make holes in it? when i try to use a 5/16" rod (the only other size at the store) no matter what amperage i use, i cannot get a steady arc to form, it just sticks (lots) i'm sure that me being a begginer isnt helping, but i can get a steady arc with the thinner rods no problem.
so if i am using an ac welder are there certain stick types that would be better than others? i appreciate any and all advice. -mike
 
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Old 05-08-06, 11:24 AM
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GWIZ said inverter welder.
This is a DC welder that uses electronics to convert AC to DC.

I would stick to 6013 rod in 1/16" and maybe 3/32" which is one size smaller that 1/8".
There are other rods like 7014 but you would be better to stick with one type 'till you get a feel for it.
Also, you should not try to learn on anything bigger that 1/8".
 
 

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