What size MIG Welder?


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Old 05-20-06, 09:14 PM
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Question What size MIG Welder?

I'd like some opinions on what size welder to buy. I'd like to weld as a hobby. Work on my old tractor and implements. Small things. Is it better to buy one that will weld 1/4" as opposed to one that will only weld 3/16"? There's not much difference in 1/16" but I know that when it comes to welding that 1/16" makes a difference. Will a hobby welder come across more things that will be better off having the ability to go to the 1/4". Thanks, Larry.
 
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Old 05-21-06, 02:57 AM
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I have a 120 volt MIG welder 90 amp output for the light things and a 240 volt, 225 amp AC/DC output stick welder for the 1/4" or larger items.

Do you have 120 or 240 volts to supply power to a welder.
You also need to go by the output current of the welder and duty cycle (welding time).
Going by the size of the metal stated on the welder is not always correct.

As to a MIG I would go for the higher rated output current/amps. for starters.
 
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Old 05-21-06, 08:01 AM
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MIG Welders

Have a Century 110V/70 amp (output) welder with a hi/lo range, and it is basically a dud. Also have a Miller 135 which does all the the light stuff really well and a Lincoln 225 for the heavier work. In my situation if starting out freshly today, I'd just buy a 220V MIG and it would pretty well do everything I have needed (and forget about the portability). Looking back over my 30 years of hobby welding the only thing that I would have missed out on without my stick welder is the use of nickle rods (to repair cast iron).
 
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Old 05-21-06, 08:56 AM
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I would try to find a miller vintage, those are very very nice but pricey when you buy a new one. I would like to find one myself. At the collage we used these and ran them all day and they worked great. Ive never used a lincoln mig welder but there stick welders are fine.
 
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Old 05-21-06, 09:41 AM
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lilredex, says he would have missed out on welding cast iron without a stick welder (nickle rod). I need to weld a crack in the block of my old 1944 Farmall tractor. It was welded once, probably years ago, and is leaking again. I ground it down and the weld was put on top of the crack. They did not grind down into the crack to make a vee for the weld to fill. Can I weld it to stop the small leak with a MIG welder?
 
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Old 05-22-06, 05:17 PM
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a little 120v 90amp MIG is not going to cut it. if you have 240v get a stick welder like the Miller thunderbolt or Lincoln ac/dc 225. welding a cast iron engine block is an involved process, with preheating, slow cooling and can only be done properly with a nickle electrode in a stick welder. go with the stick welder it will do everything you need to do.
 
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Old 05-22-06, 05:35 PM
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Larry,

I agree with GWIZ that using a mfr's claims as to how thick a material a welder can fuse is not a good number to use when choosing a welder.
The main thing to consider when buying a welder is duty cycle.
I have a small welder like what lilredex has and it has been real handy to take to weld someone's chair.
However in the paperwork I have they claim I can weld up to 3/16" mild steel.

As far as a recommendation my story is that for medium duty use the 220 volt MM150 I bought ten years ago has performed flawlessly.
This full sized unit with wheels and tank holder has been replaced by the MM180.
If I remember right the duty cycle of my older MM150 is the same as the newer 180.
This shows how marketing is used into making people think they are getting more for the money.
 
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Old 05-23-06, 07:02 AM
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Mig Welders

After many years of limping along with that under powered Century, and much procrastination, I bought my Miller. Using a friends older Miller Mig while on holidays last fall, really sealed the deal for me.

If anyone is interested........I paid $775 for the welder, $39 for the cover and $150 for the tank (filled). All Canadian funds before tax. Best deal I could find, could have easily paid $3-4 hundred more if no "shopping" was done.

You can see it all here:

http://community.webshots.com/photo/...9214605MTGpya#
 
 

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