Learning Basic welding?

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Old 01-16-07, 10:03 AM
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Learning Basic welding?

Are there classes for DIY, hobbiest arc welding, short of a full blown certification?

Or is this something you can pick up a good book on, invest in some low end arc welding gear and just jump in?

Im primarily interested in this as it might interest my 16 yr old son. I would of course surpervise and train him if self taught from book, but I myself have no experience either in welding.

Any thoughts?
 
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Old 01-16-07, 11:15 AM
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Trade school, or community education?

Our county has educational programs in this kind of thing: car repair, cooking, many activities, altho I haven't looked into welding. The benefit to this sort of thing is it's pretty cheap, and you'd get structured training in a variety of welding techniques with equipment that's working. Part of "structured" means you'd get the safety briefings as well, which is very important but might be inadvertently overlooked if you were to self-teach. And having a good instructor can make all the difference: "the book says this, but they really mean that".

They would also be able to point you in another direction or tell you how to take the next step if you want to pursue additional training. Enjoy!
 
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Old 01-16-07, 01:24 PM
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MUCH less frustration in learning if there is an experienced welder with some ability to mentor/teach available. Welding is largely practice, rather than being able to study the book and just do what it says to produce the perfect weld.

At 16, the need for early success is huge. Persistence will pay off but there's not usually much of that present in a 16 year-old.
 
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Old 01-16-07, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by IBM5081 View Post
MUCH less frustration in learning if there is an experienced welder with some ability to mentor/teach available. Welding is largely practice, rather than being able to study the book and just do what it says to produce the perfect weld.

At 16, the need for early success is huge. Persistence will pay off but there's not usually much of that present in a 16 year-old.
good point
 
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Old 02-05-07, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by rkruz View Post
Are there classes for DIY, hobbiest arc welding, short of a full blown certification?

Or is this something you can pick up a good book on, invest in some low end arc welding gear and just jump in?

Im primarily interested in this as it might interest my 16 yr old son. I would of course surpervise and train him if self taught from book, but I myself have no experience either in welding.

Any thoughts?
we are going to try something that the local JC. He needs to get permission from the High Schoold to take it but shoujld be no problem since they dont offer it.
 
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Old 02-10-07, 05:37 PM
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I bought a used welder on ebay, read the instructions and started to weld. I later picked up a few books and learned a little more. It's not rocket science but like anything else practice makes perfect. I also picked up an auto darkening
face mask which made the whole process a lot more enjoyable.
 
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Old 03-04-07, 02:57 AM
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hey when i was 15 i started welding (took a welding shop in school) found out it wasnt as hard as i thought my teacher helped me after school letting me weld in his shop at home for pratice he even gave me one of his old welders so when i was 16 i built numerous trailors with a buddy including a car trailor, 6 1/2x24 trailor, and a couple very nice 6x10 dual axle trailors made out of 3 inc metal and kept on taking shop at school (it was easy grade) i am 17 now still taking shop class (not recieving credit for it already took all the classes they offer :P) and have been offered 2 jobs doing professional welding when i get out of school its a good trait to learn young..a fire took my welder that was given to me so i am on the search for a welder
 
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Old 03-04-07, 01:48 PM
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community colleges
vocational/tech colleges

either of these are good places to look.

typically these classes can be taken by a non-matriculating student without high school approval if you do not want to apply any achieved credit to either HS or college transcripts.

look for a few books on the subject and get a welder. Don;t go too cheap or you will regret it. Some of the cheaper machines make welding a lot harder due to inconsistant operation or general lack of power.

self taught is a realistic possibility but learning some of the reasons for different rods and techniques is very important.
 
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Old 03-24-07, 07:22 PM
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Smile Suggust Instruction from a Welder

I have spent about $800 on welding classes at a local community college. It is worth every penny. I weld for personal use and not professionally. I trained under a Lincoln welding instructor with 35 years of experience.
I would recomend you take Oxy/Acetolene first. Why ? Becuase it will get use to the eye hand corridation of using the touch an the filler rod in welding. Next I would learn to Stick weld . Why because it cheap way to do good project welding of ferrious metal of 3/16 of an inch or larger. Next I would learn to GMAW and GTAW . The above will help you to master the GTAW and GMAW.
If you can master Oxy/Acetolene You will be a very good GTAW (TIG) welder. I did not take Oxy/Acetolene first and I struggled GTAW (TIG)with Aluminum Filler and it was very frustrating.
I would not buy any welder until you have some training in the type of welding you want to do. You will be wasting your money and killing the satisfaction of being creative . My Opinion.
 
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