Craftsman Welder info needed on model 112.20126

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Old 03-11-11, 12:04 PM
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Craftsman Welder info needed on model 112.20126

I have a Craftsman welder model number 112.20126 It is a 230 amp 220 volt welder.
it has two cable connectors one white and one red. One has a lower amp rating than the other. It was given to me by a friend over 30 years ago and it was old when I got it. I am guessing it is a vintage 1950 or so. Is this an AC or DC welder, and if DC is it + or - DC ? It is very large abd has a loud blower motor in it.Any help ypu can provide would be greatly appreciated.
It is still used and works well. I am using E6013 rod most of the time.
Thanks
Gary W
 
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Old 03-11-11, 09:06 PM
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It is an AC welder. I have the same machine only a 180 ampere model. It was purchased in the mid 1960s. 6013 is a good electrode/rod to use.
 
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Old 03-14-11, 06:13 PM
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Craftsman Welder question

Thans for the reply,
Any idea why there are two cable connectors?
The first one is A Red 50-230 AMPS
and the other is B White 40-190 AMPS
And is says "Limited Service AC Arc Welder on the front.

Thank you,

Gary W
 
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Old 03-15-11, 12:20 AM
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The "limited service" is because the machine has a 20% duty cycle which means that you can hold an arc for 2 minutes out of every ten minutes without the machine overheating.

There are two output plugs/jacks because if you look closely at the selector switch you will see that it has different scales on each side. The white side is the ampere rating for the white jack and the red side is for the red jack. If the selector switch is in the highest amperage position it will give 190 amperes on the white jack or 230 amperes on the red jack. Obviously only one jack can be used at a time.
 
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Old 03-15-11, 08:22 AM
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Craftsman Welder model 112.20126

Thanks furd. I thought that might me the case, but it seemed that there was very little difference between the two scales. I thought there might be difference in the way it would weld, (like the difference between dc- and dc+) but I don't know what changes you could make on AC. Again thanks for your help.
Gary W.
 
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Old 03-15-11, 08:46 AM
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My arc welder has the same type of set up. The low side works better on thinner metal and small rods. You need the high side to use the bigger rods and weld heavier steel.
 
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Old 03-15-11, 06:26 PM
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Craftsman Welder 112.20126

H, i Thanks for all of the info. It helps a lot.
I was wondering if anyone knows if the A plug which is up tp 230 Amps, is a lower voltage than the B plug which is only 190 Amp. By using a lower amperage they can boost the voltage, E=I x R (ohms law) and would boosting voltage give you a smoother weld on the lower side?

Thanks again

Gary W
 
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