Welding Lens Shade

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Old 12-21-12, 08:35 AM
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Welding Lens Shade

A bit of background. I took welding at our local trade school for about a year back in the late 70's. Worked a few jobs right after that but then got into different careers. About 10 years ago, I built myself a little hobby shop behind the house & have done some light metal working. I have a Lincoln 230 rod welder but I use a little Lincoln wire welder 90% of the time for small jobs I do.

I really have a hard time using a #10 lens in my hood for wire welding. I'm curious to know if I can use something lighter for wire welding like a 9 or even an 8 & still be safe?
 
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Old 12-21-12, 08:49 AM
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I can't answer the lens question but you might want to check the auto darkening helmets. You can dial in the desired darkness with the controls. It's really amazing how fast it can go from clear to dark when you strike the ark and you have much better control of your starting point before you pull the trigger without having to knock the helmet down before starting.
 
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Old 12-21-12, 09:13 AM
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Thanks Toolmom.

I might also clarify that this is mig, NOT tig.
 
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Old 12-21-12, 10:05 AM
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I use a Miller auto darkening helmet and vary the darkness depending on what I'm doing. I think it goes down to 8 which is light enough to see when I'm working at really low power. For most of my normal welding I have it at about 9 or a bit higher. Tig welding is the worst so you'll be OK with a 9 and could go to an 8 for low power work. 8 is not enough though when you have to power cranked up. Another benefit of the auto darkening helmet is that it's 3 when turned off or not darkened which makes it usable for some torch and plasma work.
 
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Old 01-01-13, 05:45 PM
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I wonder if extensive research has been done to as how the arc effects the human eyes?

Usually you have these older guys who just blink and weld. They usually have eye problems but not anything they complain about.

I'm sure that with a welding helmet, you are still subjected to some sort of damaging rays. There's no way you can avoid them COMPLETELY without not welding.
 
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