Failed leachfield?.....maybe?

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Old 02-22-05, 10:10 AM
ISOBZ
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Failed leachfield?.....maybe?

I'm curious, has anyone out there used products with high bacteria and enzymes to restore failed septic fields? I have puddling in what I believed to be my leachfield area. I am considering gambling on a product with 2.5-10 billion bacteria counts per gram to remedy what I believe is failed leachfield due to several years of use.
 
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Old 02-22-05, 12:35 PM
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Hi ISOBZ,
- what exactly have you been pumping into the field so far ? Is it only the liquid runoff from the separation chamber?

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Old 02-22-05, 12:47 PM
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Not being an expert and only having homes with septic systems as experience, I have to think that your tank is full of solids or your leech field has failed. Adding bacteria to a full tank will not have any bearing on the problem. You may have too many solids sitting in the tank and the liquids are having to flow (almost) directly from the inlet pipe to the outlet. Sounds like time to pump and have the tank and leech field inspected by a pro.
Enzymes will not help a failed leech field. If the ground is not percolating and absorbing and dispersing the water then enzymes will be of no use. Most likely the leech field will have to be replaced/relocated. Good luck.
 
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Old 02-22-05, 01:07 PM
ISOBZ
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I haven't dug up the system yet but, there is no pump involved it is all gravity fed. I haven't had any back up problems at the house and the liquid that seeps to the top off the grass/soil is definately not equal to what has been put in the system. The household waste minus laundry water (laundry has it's own gray water system) is all that is feed to the system.I'm thinking digging up my tank inspection/pump-out cover is probably where I should start. Then if there aren't enough solids in tank to worry about, I'll dig up the "D-box". What would happen if I had a broken pipe between the "D-box" and septic field? Any info. or help is appreciated. I'm still thinking but not acting on it yet until I get more info.
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Last edited by ISOBZ; 02-22-05 at 01:13 PM. Reason: needs more info.
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Old 02-24-05, 10:10 AM
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Hi ISOBZ,
- you're on the right track, dig up the lid first ( many older systems just have landscape ties or similar lumber over an open box) to check. If it hasn't been pumped for "several years" then it may be time to pump it anyway.
A broken pipe between D'box and field would only partly affect it as there' s usually 4-8 pipes here.

Do it Right - Do it once.
 
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