Install Bigger Jet Pump??

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  #1  
Old 07-09-05, 01:27 PM
bobinyelm
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Install Bigger Jet Pump??

We presently have a Meyers HJ50 1/2hp double pipe deep jet pump (15yrs old) on our 50ft 4" cased well (28 yrs old) in sandy soil in South Jersey. The present well cap is underground, and we do not know exactly where it is located (no records are on file with any government agency). It works perfectly, and provides adequate flow and pressure for us.

We are selling the home and the buyers had a test done that showed the pump flows 5 gal/min "wide open" into a 3/4" hose at the tank drain during a 30 minute test, showing 22psi on the pump gauge during the test (though we have the pump shut-off set to 55psi normally, which it easily achieves). The well service said the system is totally obsolete and should be replaced with a 200+ft well and submersible pump to the tune of $11,000+. They said no modern home uses a deep well jet pump, and because of the sandy soil, a submersible shouldn't be put in our present well. They said the minimum considered acceptable flow today is 15 to 20 gal/per minute from a well for a 3br home, but I think they just want to sell us an expensive upgrade.

Though the present flow is fine for us (and will probably be for the buers as well), would installing a new larger (3/4hp or 1hp) deep well jet pump actually deliver the 8 gal/min at 40psi the data suggests (assuming the well is capable at supplying the water volume, which I've been told it is)? I think that flow rate should satisfy our buyers.

Other than upgrading to 20 amp service for the the larger pump, is there anything difficult about installing the higher hp pump? It appears it will mount on the present tank in our basement and plug into the two flexible ABS hoses that feed the present pump.

How hard is it to prime the new pump? Are special tools required?

Thanks,
Bob
Tabernacle, NJ
 

Last edited by bobinyelm; 07-09-05 at 01:39 PM.
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  #2  
Old 07-10-05, 08:04 AM
P
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According to Myer's pumping charts, a HJ75D (3/4 hp) will deliver 12 gpm on a 30/50 pressure setting at 40' to water depth. I assume that since the well is only 50' deep to begin with, that the water is probably much higher than that.
This also assumes, of course, that the well can support this increased flow rate.
Have you had a problem with sand in this well? It sure sounds to me like the well company is out to sell you a new well regardless of whether or not you need it.
To install a larher deep well pump you'll have to pull all of the piping and chance the deep well ejector. It must be matched to the pump.
Ron
 
  #3  
Old 07-10-05, 09:44 AM
bobinyelm
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Couple more questions on Bigger Jet Pump-

Originally Posted by Pumpman
According to Myer's pumping charts, a HJ75D (3/4 hp) will deliver 12 gpm on a 30/50 pressure setting at 40' to water depth. I assume that since the well is only 50' deep to begin with, that the water is probably much higher than that.
This also assumes, of course, that the well can support this increased flow rate.
Have you had a problem with sand in this well? It sure sounds to me like the well company is out to sell you a new well regardless of whether or not you need it.
To install a larher deep well pump you'll have to pull all of the piping and chance the deep well ejector. It must be matched to the pump.
Ron
Ron,

Thanks for the reply!

NO problems whatsoever with well or with sand in water output. I have been told that our aquifer is vast and capable of tremendous flow rates.

As far as changing the ejector, we cannot locate the well unless we dig and follow the plastic piping because we have plastic pipes, casings, and wel head/cap. Is there a way of finding wells w/o this destructive technique? We have checked with local and state agencies and no paperwork on our well is on file to show the location.

Yes, I agree that they are trying to sell a new well to us. How much is delivery considered acceptable these days? The 15 gpm the well folks quoted us seems high for an absolute minimum.

What happens if we were to put in a larger pump w/ the present ejector? Would we gain flow rate? Would we shorten pump life? I ask because we can buy a Meyers "Water Ace" brand RC-10 1hp pump for $250, yet I am sure finding the well could cost several times that alone.

Lastly, when a manufacturer quotes a flow rate at a given depth, is that "open line" flow, or is it at the pressure range specified (i.e., 30 to 50 psi)?

THANKS,
Bob
 
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Old 07-10-05, 05:35 PM
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The ejector needs to be replaced when a bigger pump is installed. I can't say what effect using the wrong ejector would have on a bigger pump. Don't even want to guess.
We generally try to get the flow into a range that will satisfy all requirements of a home. We take into account the number of persons, number of fixtures, whether there is a swimming pool, any livestock, etc., in sizing a pump. When we install a treatment system in our area, we'll usually size it to treat 12-15 gpm.
When a manufacturer states flow rates in a chart, it's at a certain pressure at a given depth to water. The rate I quoted on the last post was on a 30/50 pressure switch at a water level depth of 40'.
Ron
 
  #5  
Old 07-10-05, 07:29 PM
J
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I don't see any problem with your existing setup. If the water passes any potabilty tests then you don't have to do anything. The pump supplies enough water for the house? You are not having any problems with it? Tell them you will not make the improvement. If that is a deal killer for the sale then wait for the next buyer. The well company wants to sell them a new well and pump. SElling a house is all negotiation. They are looking for a reason to reduse your selling price.
 
  #6  
Old 07-10-05, 08:12 PM
bobinyelm
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Send the buyers packing?

Originally Posted by joed
I don't see any problem with your existing setup. If the water passes any potabilty tests then you don't have to do anything. The pump supplies enough water for the house? You are not having any problems with it? Tell them you will not make the improvement. If that is a deal killer for the sale then wait for the next buyer. The well company wants to sell them a new well and pump. SElling a house is all negotiation. They are looking for a reason to reduse your selling price.
There IS NO problem as far as I can see, but these people are VERY careful and they hired a general house inspector, and the another "expert" for each major system in the house because the general inspector had a disclaimer for each and every system (i.e., "I am not an expert with regard to _________________ [fill in the blank with water/electrical/roof, etc.] so it advised that such an expert be consulted."). The general inspection report was 33 pages long, if that gives you any idea of how thorough they were.

NO "flaws" were found in the house, but the inspector noted that when ALL bathroom faucets and toilets were flushed simultaneously, the shower flow was reduced. Now, no sane person flushes toilets and opens faucets wide open when someone (they like) is in the shower, but that made the buyers think our well was bad (They had a well in a former house go dry). Actually, I suspect most of the so-called flow "problem" is in the water softener and solids filter (which according to our water testing shouldn't even be installed). Such devices WILL reduce flow as far as I know.

By the way, our real estate agent says ALL inspectors do this "disclaimer" here because so many got sued when something went wrong with the house later and the buyers sued the inspectors (and the Real Estate agencies as well*). This way general inspectors cannot generally be held liable.

These buyers are VERY careful. For instance, someone told them all "good houses" have 200amp electrical service (ours is NOT an "all-electric" home), so they demanded our 150amp service be upgraded to 200amps as well, which I am doing.

I would send them packing, but they made a "full price" offer the second day the house was on the market, and we bought another house predicated on this sale. Putting the house back on the market a month after it was "sold" and we are committed to the next house 1500 miles away is not a happy alternative to trying to make them happy. Plus, they are putting 20% down and are pre-approved for the mortgage.


By the way, the potability test you mention tests for 27 specific chemical contaminants using Gas Chromatography, besides the usual bacteria, pH, lead, radioactivity and minerals testing. The potability test alone is costing us (as the sellers) OVER $600!! The testing lab must also certify the location of the property being tested within three feet LAT/LONG using a $4300 GPS that is tied in to the State EPA. The unit takes 250 separate readings and submits the average!! This type test is MANDATORY in NJ, BTW. It is NUTS.

Bob
*My agent is, in fact, presently being sued because a roof on a house she sold TWO years ago leaked last month, and even though the buyers' own inspector SAID the roof needed "attention" and the buyers did nothing, they are suing because the seller had had an inspection done FOUR years ago mentioning the roof problem that the agent did not turn over to the buyers. The agent, in fact, didn't KNOW the seller had a past inspection two years earlier, but that doesn't seem to make a difference in NJ. Everyone sues everyone else over everything, so everyone runs scared.
 

Last edited by bobinyelm; 07-10-05 at 08:24 PM.
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