Septic with separate kitchen grease trap

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  #1  
Old 11-01-05, 05:30 PM
Sharons
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Septic with separate kitchen grease trap

Purchased house built in 1960. It has a septic system and have found out that it also has a kitchen grease trap which also drains the washing machine. We are not sure how all of this is related, but are beginning to redo the plumbing soon, as there are pinhole leaks in the copper piping etc.

Can we eliminate the kitchen grease trap and just have everything go into the septic? We are not knowledgable so any input is appreciated as far as the purpose of each and advantages etc.

Thanks in advance.
 
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  #2  
Old 11-06-05, 05:45 PM
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I would not use the grease trap idea; you should not be putting grease into your septic anyway. The laundry water may be going into a separate drain field. When you re-plumb the house I would run that water into your septic also. The problem you might have then is your drain field may not have been sized large enough to handle the extra water. I hope I understood you correctly and hope this helps.
 
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Old 11-12-05, 10:19 AM
Sharons
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Thanks. We are going to have the septic people out to see what we can figure out before we replumb. The drain field will be a concern. We were told it is a kitchen grease trap, but maybe it is just another mini septic since someone told us it was added at a later date.
 
  #4  
Old 11-12-05, 10:25 AM
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Whoever installed the grease trap may have had a concern about the amount of grease going to the septic. Grease is not really friendly to septics in large amounts. Grease traps are made to be cleaned out periodically. It is NOT a pleasant chore. The smell is terrible. I used to clean restaurant grease traps and I found it a bit more tolerable if I dumped a bucket of ice into it first. Removing it would probably be in your best interest. Good luck.
 
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Old 11-12-05, 10:30 AM
Sharons
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We'll know more when the septic people come out, but in the backyard outside the kitchen window around 6' from the house, is a concrete slab, I assume, covering the grease trap. How do they access the grease trap with the concrete there?
 
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Old 11-12-05, 10:35 AM
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Hmmmm, an "actual" grease trap has a divider in it. The grease and water go in one end and the grease sinks to the bottom there. Then the water builds up and goes over the divider to the septic. The grease doesn't just "disappear" so it has to be removed. If not, eventually, it would clog the piping. Would be real interested to know what you find out when you have the septic people out. Thanks.
 
  #7  
Old 11-20-05, 05:09 AM
Sharons
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Just an update since you have tried to be of help. The cement slab had nothing underneath it. There is a grease trap off the kitchen which the septic people pumped out (drains the kitchen sink and the washing machine). Also the house septic tank was pumped out. These were both home made systems with concrete blocks and cement cover and drain fields. It is a four bedroom house and the septic was only about 500 gallons. The grease trap was smaller. Neither one is connected to the other. The septic man advised leaving it that way when we replumb as the septic tank is not very big. Both drain fields are working (thank goodness). I'm not sure what the best method of maintaining these are except to have them pumped out about every 2-3 years. It is pretty interesting! If there are any additional maintenance tips you might have feel free to send them our way.

Thanks for the help. Sharon
 
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Old 11-20-05, 06:55 PM
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Thanks for the update. When it comes to septic systems the key is "treat them nice". Don't dump a bunch of stuff down the drain that will overburden the system. Soap contains oils that do not agree with the system so don't go overboard with it.Grease and oil are probably a septics worst enemy. It cannot digest these things quickly. YES, I said digest. A septic tank contains living bacteria that eats what you put into the tank. That brings up another thing. Don't overdo it with things that will kill the bacteria. Bleach etc.. An old septic man once told me "If it didn't go through you, it shouldn't go through the septic." Little bit of overkill there but basically true and good advice. Good luck with your system.
 
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