pressure switch or pump problem ?


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Old 10-15-06, 11:26 AM
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Exclamation pressure switch or pump problem ?

I changed my pressure switch to a 40-60 from a 20-40 because i did not have enough pressure to fill the storage tank in the new reverse osmosis system i installed. The new system requires at least 40 psi to fill the tank. It was only filling the filters and not the tank. So anyway i install new switch and could only get the pump to run the pressure up to 48 psi . The pump is still going but not going above 48 psi. I did add pressure to the tank after i drained the pressure. It was set at 18 psi. I added air to about 31 psi and fired everything up again and could only get 48 psi again. I know the the tank should have 2 psi less then the cut in pressure which should be 38 psi but i don't know if my tank or bladder can take the added air pressure since i am not sure on the model pressure tank i have. Where should i go from here? Is it the pump since it can't go higher than 48 psi or something else? Any information is greatly appreciated as i am trying to make good use out of our new drinking water system and trying to make the wife happy.
Thanks,Chris
 

Last edited by hatfield; 10-15-06 at 01:22 PM. Reason: added ! icon for emergency
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Old 10-15-06, 02:34 PM
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If you have doubts the tank will take the 38 psi, what do you think is going to happen when the pressure gets to 60 psi?

It's already been to 48 so it will take the 38 with no problem.


Ok, if you have a shut off valve between the presure tank and the house, turn it off and see if the pump will pump it up. If not, it is a pump problem. If it does pump it up, it would seem there is enough water flowing somewhere to the point the pump cannot get ahead of the flow. Probably still a pump problem unless the flow is quite large.

So, depending upon what type and size of pump you have and the depth of the well, you pump may ot actually be capable of supplying the volume and pressure of water you require. With tha, you could do one of two things:

install a larger pump or add a secondary pump above ground to increase the pressure. With the second option, you need to be sure you do not try to pump more water than the well pump can deliver. You will gain nothing if the well cannot keep up with actual volume demand.
 
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Old 10-15-06, 05:09 PM
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Thanks for your reply. Well the pump that i have is a 1/2 hp jet pump a Goulds j04853 model to be exact. I would guess but not positive it may be about ten years old. I have no idea how deep the well is.

The only thing i have been able to come with is that the pump only being 1/2 horse and 110 and not 220 and how ever old it is it might not be capable of making that much pressure. I asked one of my uncles and he said that might be it but wasn't sure. What is the life expectancy of a well pump and pressure tank?

I will be sure to try the test mentioned in the reply by shuting off the valve after the pump and see if it builds more pressure.
Thanks,Chris
 
 

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