How do you remove 1 inch galvanized water-supply pipe that passes through a cind

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Old 04-17-08, 04:22 PM
Z
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How do you remove 1 inch galvanized water-supply pipe that passes through a cind

How do you remove 1 inch galvanized water-supply pipe that passes through a cinder block wall?

My well water supply pipe broke and Iím going to replace it with the 1 inch black poly like all my neighbors have. (I was going to use Schedule 40 PVC but Iím told that black poly is all thatís now used for well supply in my area.)

The galv pipe was approx 21 feet long running in a straight line from a well-pit to the basement. I trenched down to the pipe (40 inches) and cut the pipe about one foot from the exterior basement wall and one foot from the exterior well-pit cinder block wall. I then removed the old pipe from the trench. (It literally fell apart where it had broken and sprung a leak.)

Someone told me that if I did the above Iíd be able to ďpush-pullĒ the remainder of the old pipe through the wall and then reuse the hole for the new pipe. I obviously didnít understand ďpush-pullĒ . I did the above and then smacked the pipe remaining in the wall with a 5 lb sledge hammer many times. But it doesnít budge. (I have bigger sledge hammers.)

I donít have a clue as to how to remove it. When a pipe is run through a cinder block how thick is the cement after itís cemented in? Do you use some kind of power tool to chip close around the pipe on both sides of the wall and then give it a good smack? Or do you keep chipping away until you see a lot of space around the pipe all the way through the block? You can see how much I donít know.

What I forgot to also tell the person that gave me the advice was that I believe that code says you must put a sleeve through the masonry wall 2 pipe sizes larger than the water pipe and then run the water pipe through the sleeve. So if I understand correctly, actually I need a hole to accommodate a 1 Ĺ inch sleeve to satisfy the 2 sizes larger requirement. So even if I get the old 1 inch galv pipe stub out it seems like Iíd still have to enlarge the hole for the sleeve.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
 
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Old 04-17-08, 06:07 PM
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Cut the pipe about 10" from the wall on the inside of the wall, then use a bigger hammer. Not so much it cracks the wall, but if you cut it that length on both sides, you can hit it from both sides and "push-pull" it from the wall.
 
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Old 04-17-08, 06:54 PM
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unless the installer put some kind of fitting inside the wall it should just hammer out. Most recomendations are a sleeve through the wall with the pipe inside that because of the corrosive effect of cement on some pipes. besure to insulate the space with spray foam or foam pipe insulation. since it didn't come out easily make sure it is a straight shot thru by looking thru the pipe. It may be easier to cut it off flush and plug then drill a new hole.
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Old 04-18-08, 06:51 AM
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Thanks gentlemen.

I'm going out again today and I'll look through the pipe to make sure it's a straight shot through the wall. I'll try hammering again with a bigger hammer. I didn't know whether that made sense at all but it sounds like it does.

If it doesn't want to come out then plugging and drilling a new hole sounds like a good idea.
 
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Old 04-18-08, 12:16 PM
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Thanks again guys! It worked. I hammered it out and I see a nice clean hole all the way through. I think I'll have water very soon.
 
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Old 04-19-08, 03:35 AM
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Did you use the "bigger" hammer??? On my jobsite trailer, there are probably 10 hammers, each with its own job, so sometimes "bigger" is better.
 
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Old 04-22-08, 10:19 AM
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Hi Larry. Sorry I took so long to get back. Got absorbed and didn't log-on for some time.

I did use my bigger sledge hammer. Don't know what size but the handle is I guess about 30 inches long. Hit the pipe on one side then the other as you said. Worked like a champ.

But I screwed up at the other end of the pipe which goes through the well-pit wall. Hard to get a good swing in the well-pit so I was banging away outside in the trench on the pipe stub sticking out of the wall. My fault. Dumb! I wasn't paying enough attention and all I did was bend the pipe a little where it enters the wall and also flare out the end of the pipe. I should have only banged a little on one side of the wall and then the other like I did for the basement wall.

Went inside the pit and tried banging there in the other direction-but it wonít budge. Tried drilling some holes around the pipe on both the inside and outside wall, then banging it -but it wonít budge.

I am trying to figure out this morning whether to rent a tool to chip away around the pipe or rent a tool to just drill a new hole. I know the well pit wall is just one cinder block deep. Canít figure out why the pipe is so tight?

I know nothing about building construction. This will give you a good laugh! But it just seems to me that a lot of the pipe may or may not be just hanging in air inside the block depending on where the original hole was bored. Isnít a lot of the block just air space? Or when people bore completely through a cinder block for a pipe are they supposed to stay away from certain portions of the block? (OK to laugh!)

I heard you can rent a core-drill (I think) thatís supposed to make a new hole easy. My old pipe is 7 inches from the well-pit floor. I was thinking of drilling (ha ha) a new hole close to the old one. I thought I saw a picture of a small core-drill that could do a 2 inch hole. I saw pictures of some bigger ones that are on wheels but I donít think Iíd be able to get those into the pit. Might be able to drill from the outside in. Donít know which would be better. But there is real nasty hard stone or earth about an inch below where the pipe comes out from the well-pit wall into the trench. (Murphyís law). A hammer and chisel will chip it whatever it is. It doesnít look man-made. I guess itís really not in the way anyway.

If chipping out the old pipe requires less skill than drilling a new hole, even if itís more work, maybe thatís best for me. I can just picture me drilling a new hole so crooked I could look through it and see the clouds. But on the other hand I guess a hole anywhere at all near horizontal would still be OK.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
 
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