Jet pump or piston pump for drawing from lake?


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Old 07-28-08, 07:39 PM
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Jet pump or piston pump for drawing from lake?

Hi,
My reliable but sometimes temperamental piston pump/gas engine combo has bit the dust and now that I'm wired for electricity at my cottage I'm going to treat myself to an electric motor. The question is, what pump? The plumbing pro at the local hardware store (usually gives good advice) recommends a jet pump/pressure tank combo (Red Lion, 1/2 or 3/4 H.P.) which he's offering it at a decent price. When I mentioned to my neighbor on the next property that I was thinking of buying this, he said "Ach! Those jet pumps are nothing but trouble. I had one and it kept clogging up. I threw it in the lake and went back to a Pompco piston pump. A real pump!" This guy is a retired mechanic, handy with pumps and motors, so his comments have given me pause. Any of you folks have opinions/experience to share regarding jet pumps? My neighbor was pumping from a well, and sometimes didn't use the pump for 4 or 5 months. (cold winters in Quebec!) Water in the well apparently got quite brackish. My situation would be pumping from a lake- not pristine, but quite clean. Some sediment sometimes get stirred up right near the shore, but I'll run the pipe at least 15 ft out and of course I'll use a good foot valve. Pipes and valve will be emptied and cleaned at end of season.(Static lift about 12 ft., total run, approx 60 ft. Will use 5/4'' tubing.)
Having walked down to the pump house in the pouring rain for many years to start the old pump with the starter rope, I'm looking forward to a more-automated system), but I do want reliability. Can I expect that with a jet pump??
Thanks... Frank
(BTW, if you see this post, speedbump, could you expand on your comment in another thread re built-in check valves: "I would still get rid of the Check Valve at the Pump. It will be nothing but problems.")
 
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Old 07-28-08, 07:59 PM
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A sumersable will be more efficient than a jetpump with less maintenance. Most come with a checkvalve built in.
 
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Old 07-29-08, 10:22 AM
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Couple of dozen people in my neighborhood pump out of lakes. They all use 2" pipe and they all use centrifugal irrigation pumps. Mostly Sta-Rite and Goulds

An irrigation pump differs from a well pump in that a well pump is designed to pump smaller amounts of water to higher amounts of pressure than an irrigation pump. Most irrigation sprinkler heads are rated at 30PSI whereas most people would get irritated at taking showers at that low pressure.

When looking ata pump, the biggest giveaway that it was designed for irrigation is that the pump "belly", the place below the intake is enlarged, almost bulbous.

You should read this before you waste a bunch of money:
http://www.irrigationtutorials.com/pump.htm

Getting electricity down there will be a headache. I don't know about Canada, but in the US, code calls for direct burial wire 2 feet deep. You will also have to worry about voltage loss to determine what gauge wire you will need. Definitely want 240VAC to reduce the gauge and cost of the wire.
 
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Old 07-30-08, 06:32 AM
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I am for the Submersible Pump also, but if you have to use a Jet for reasons already mentioned, the lift isn't too bad (once you get the Jet primed) but the distance is a little long.

The reason to not have a Check Valve at the Pump is: when the Pump turns off, that Valve closes. The suction line from the Valve all the way to the Foot Valve in the Well is now able to come under Vacuum if the Foot Valve fails or if there is a hole anywhere in the piping. This can suck in contaminated water which will be pulled into the house on the next Pump Cycle, or it can let in air which can cause the Pump to lose its prime next go round. It also sometimes masks other problems that should have not been ignored.

bob...
 
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Old 07-30-08, 06:15 PM
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Thanks for the input. waterwelldude. Although I didn't mention it, I do have a submersible under consideration. My hesitation in using one (in addition to higher cost) is that I was told it should be submerged at a water depth of at least 10 ft. The lake depth increases quite gradually near my part of the shore. I'd have to go about 50 ft out to get to that depth.
 
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Old 07-30-08, 06:22 PM
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Thanks, Vey
Lots of food for thought (and a great link- I will do my homework!) I was hoping to place the pump in the basement of my house- so short electrical line, but a long trip for the water to travel up from the lake- a possible problem as speedbump has pointed out in his post.

Frank
 
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Old 07-30-08, 06:27 PM
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Very clear explanation. I can see why this could (and probably would) create problems. Thanks, Bob..

Frank
 
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Old 07-30-08, 06:30 PM
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"I was hoping to place the pump in the basement of my house- so short electrical line, but a long trip for the water to travel up from the lake"

Terrible idea. Pumps push much better than they pull. The best situation is to get them as close to the source as possible.
 
 

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