Low Pressure

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Old 01-05-09, 07:56 AM
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Low Pressure

Yesterday 07:18 PM - permalinkWoodworker26
Dear Valve Guy,
I replaced my pressure cut-off switch w/new today, put in a new guage and re-charged my Amtrol bladder tank to 2 psi less than the system cut-in pressure (yes I set this with the system essentially drained). My settings now are CI @40, CO @60. I have no idea where they were before I started since the pressure gage was clogged, bladder tank had no pressure reading, and the CO adjustment screw was buried against the spring (no more adjustment left).

Million dollar Question: Do I dare "play" with getting higher pressures with a system that has not been altered off of 60 psi in 20 years? The whole objective of this project was to diagnos a lack of pressure in the house, yet after all of these changes, i see no noticeable improvement. Perhaps I should shut my pie hole and quit complainin'? Any thoughts would be appreciated.
 
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Old 01-05-09, 08:01 AM
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As long as your pump can build enough pressure to shut itself off, there is no reason you can't increase the pressure switch setting if you want. I have mine set at 50/70, with a 60 PSI Constant Pressure Valve. This gives me 60 PSI constant while I am using water. 40/60 gives you an average pressure of 50 PSI, 50/70 would give you 60 PSI average.

When the lines to the house are too small or corroded, increasing the pressure may give you more pressure in the house. You just can't turn up the pressure switch if your pump can't build enough to reach the shut off point.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 12:46 PM
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I'm thinking of a couple of things. You should be feeling two pressures. One pressure is what you feel from the tank when you first open a tap. Then as water is drawn down in the tank, the pump comes on and there should be a different pressure. The second pressure is ONLY what is coming from the pump. Since the tank is pretty much empty, it plays no part in pressure until the tap is closed and the tank starts filling up again.

Do you feel those two pressures? Is the second one too low, such as when you are drawing bath water or taking a shower?

Last time I was at one of the Big Box stores, I saw that they had a gauge for sale that was connected to a hose connection. That way you could measure the pressure in the house rather than what is at the tank. Not much money as I recall.
 
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Old 01-16-09, 03:26 PM
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I would shut the power off to the well and drain the tank. shut the valves so water won't go anywhere. Fill the pressure tank with 48 psi turn on the power and shut it off again when it hits 50 psi. adjust your switch so that it kicks on here. Then, adjust your cutoff to 75 psi. But like has been mentioned, it will only work if your pump will build up to that much. You'll know if if can't when it just keeps running and running but won't build up to it.
 
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