installing a crock in an existing floor drain

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Old 04-08-09, 04:05 PM
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installing a crock in an existing floor drain

i would like to know if it is possible to remove the existing floor drain which is located in the lowest part of the house and replace it with a crock. the house is a 1960 tri-level. i need know to if this is possible or what would be the best solution, i have water that comes in the basement around the wall and where the floor meets. i plan on connecting the sump pump to a 4inch line that runs to a storm drain. please advise................thanks




install a crock in an existing floor drain or
 
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Old 04-08-09, 04:27 PM
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What exactly do you mean when you say a "crock" (perhaps you mean a "sump") and why do you think that would fix the problem with water getting into your basement through a wall?
 
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Old 04-08-09, 05:59 PM
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yes, I mean sump, I figured that my main line running out to the street might be plugged or the tiles running around the foundation are plugged (not sure) I am just trying to fix the problem of water coming into my basement when it rains, and when we have heavy rain, it comes up through the floor drain.







Originally Posted by Vey View Post
What exactly do you mean when you say a "crock" (perhaps you mean a "sump") and why do you think that would fix the problem with water getting into your basement through a wall?
 
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Old 04-08-09, 07:09 PM
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While I can understand the desperation, a slow and steady approach I think would best.

There are excavation people that specialize in the type of problem you describe. Your drain could be plugged with tree roots. Before you start treating the symptoms rather than the problem, I would stop and think.

I have to tell you that a dry basement with a drain beats all hell out of a damp basement with a sump, a pump and the dankness that accompanies them. In fact, my father back in the '60's when he was looking to buy a house, would turn around and leave if he saw a sump or a pump in the basement or a mound in the back yard. "Too low!"

Since the '60's what with people trying to save money on land, buying on low land (usually low pasture land which was pasture land because it was too wet to grow much) has become "normal." Which is why you read about sumps and crocks and pumps and all the headaches that accompany them.

So maybe you need to bring in a pro to take a look? Maybe start with a rotorooter type fella to begin with. Money well spent if it avoids the additional problems you are thinking about bringing upon yourself.
 
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Old 04-09-09, 01:50 AM
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Forgot to say that thsi guy makes a lot of sense:
How to have a dry basement

If water is getting into the drain and coming up, then have you investigated how? Have you seen the other end? Can it be moved? Is it laid tile pipe that can be replaced with PVC? Lots of questions.
 
 

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