Battery backup decision help needed

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Old 10-28-09, 12:39 PM
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Battery backup decision help needed

I need to replace my old and failed Simer A5000 and I'm not interested in what Home Depot, Menards or Lowes is selling. I found the Sumpro Stormpro 2100-DC which is in my budget and I was wondering if anyone had any experiences. Best part from me is the company is 10 miles from my house and takes AGM batteries unlike Simer, Watchdog, etc. I know everyone recommends the Aquanot 2 but that's twice the price though worth the money I suppose. Just would rather not. I've already had all the downspouts and sump pump hoses buried and exiting FAR from the house. During moderate rain storms it's just a constant trickle coming into the pit (approx 18" wide)

One more question, I discovered my pit is full of gravel? Not just a little but like 4-6". Should I get it out and just use bricks to raise the pumps?

As always on this forum, I appreciate the help.
 
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Old 10-28-09, 05:43 PM
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We sell Metro's Stormpro 2100 pump so I know a little about it. If you just have a little water comming in it would probably work ok for you. In our testing we found it pumped about 15-17 GPM at 10ft and thats about half of what a normal sump pump does. We usually don't recommend it for alot of water as it probably wouldn't keep up.

The next step up from that has a 1/3 hp pump that runs normally on AC but then has an inverter that changes the battery power into 115v AC to run the same pump in an outage. The downside is the inverter sucks alot of juice and it will only run about 2hrs steady on a fully charged battery. The pump is nice though as it pumps about 35-40GPM and has a low 4.5 amp draw. The system will of course run much longer in a stop/start mode depending on run time.

I would get the gravel out if possible. I can't tell you how many stones I've pulled out of "defective" pumps where the stone was jamming the impeller.
 
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Old 10-28-09, 09:23 PM
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Are you on a well or municipal water?

Would you consider one of the water powered sump pumps? You'd have no batteries to worry about.
 
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Old 10-30-09, 04:56 AM
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pro series

Do a search on the Pro Series 2400 and see what you think. I have had it for a couple years now and I am very pleased with it. Does a self test weekly , seems to be very reliable. Mine has worked several times during power outages while I was not home, and has handled my active pit well.
2400 Battery Backup Sump Pumps | PHCC Pro Series Sump Pumps
 
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Old 11-02-09, 08:31 AM
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I ended up picking up the 2100-DC on Thursday, driving to pick it up (since it wasn't in stock) and then charging up the battery - but not installing it. Good thing I did buy/pickup/charge it because our power went out Fri in the midst of a 2.62" 2 day rainstorm! Quickly swapped out the normal pump for the backup and had it draining the well for 3 hours (every 3min for 30 seconds). Power came back on and the battery reached green (charged status) in 10-15 minutes.

I'm not totally thrilled with the system to be honest. The base that keeps it an inch or so off the pit floor isn't connected solidly and when first dropping it in and it activating it just bogged down from either muck or the wrong angle. Either way for comparisons sake (for future buyers) my normal A/C Campbell Hausfeld can drain the pit of it's (horribly short) 6-7" integrated float arm in about 7-8 seconds. As mentioned the backup (rated at 2100gph at 10') drains it's 10-12" float arm length in 30 seconds. Not bad but you can definitely see the difference. Even though we were experiencing record rains it still had me worried especially after that bogging incident - in final install I put both on top of 4x4x2" bricks. Makes me wish I got the 3000gph version for a couple hundred more.

Now my downspout/sump pump drain tubes leading away from the house underground are full of water since the ground is too saturated to take any more.

Lastly, I dug out a 5 gal pail or muck, gravel and concrete bits when doing the final install of the pumps. I'll bet I could have dug out another pail full if I wasn't so tired. Thank you all for all of your help.
 
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Old 11-02-09, 08:34 AM
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Originally Posted by bubb1957 View Post
Do a search on the Pro Series 2400 and see what you think. [/url]
Appreciate the input. The one feature I dig about the one I choose is that it switches to AC if the main pump fails.
 
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Old 11-02-09, 08:38 AM
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Originally Posted by aandpdan View Post
Are you on a well or municipal water?

Would you consider one of the water powered sump pumps? You'd have no batteries to worry about.
I looked into it and for the cost ($2K installed is what I saw) I'd be more interested in spending a bit more for a natural gas automatic generator.
 
 

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