Can You Treat A Septic Field?


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Old 11-18-09, 08:00 AM
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Can You Treat A Septic Field?

Our field is only 12 years old and seems to be full of water most of the time. We have been very careful of what goes into the system and have faithfully had the tank pumped every 3 years. Is there a product or method of helping the soil drain more properly? I see some bacterial products on the web.
Thank you for your help.
 
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Old 11-25-09, 12:37 PM
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When you say "full of water", I can only assume you see water above the ground ?.

Bacterial products only help dissolve solids. They won't help drainage, unless it is a clog that can be slowly eaten away by bacteria.
 
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Old 11-27-09, 09:43 AM
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The normal reason a drain field is full of water, is that it has been raining and the ground is flooded.
We have all had a lot of rain lately.
Do you live in a valley or an area that has a seasonal high water table?
Have you looked at local rivers, lakes, ditches to see if the water is higher than usual?
The next reason may be that the inspection covers on the septic are loose and the rain and surface water is getting in. Check that the top of the septic and the surrounding ground have been landscaped to ensure that water does not sit on top of the septic.
Check that surface water is not making its way down hill onto the drain field if it is, build a wall or install a French drain to divert the water round the drain field.
The next reason is that the family has been using more water than the drain field was designed to cope with. Have you people staying with you? Perhaps a new washing machine?
A drain field is designed for the number of people who are expected to live there and their anticipated water usage over a typical 24 hour period.
The design takes into account the number of people, the type of layout and the soil condition.
Pick a spot at the bottom of the drain field and dig a hole.
The surface of the ground water should be three feet below the lowest part of the drain field.
 
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Old 11-27-09, 05:03 PM
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Another reason that a drainfield will stop working is because it has been mistreated. Do you use double-ply toilet paper? Use bleach to clean or wash clothes with? Those chemical tablets to keep the toilet bowl clean?

Those things, and others, can ruin a drainfield. There is nothing you can buy to fix it.
 
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Old 12-01-09, 07:07 AM
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No bleach, chemicals, grease etc. Lots of rain this year but I'm not sure that's the problem. Could be ground water seepage. Usual amount of people in the house. Going to try Septic Seep and then bacteria.
 
 

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