Sump pit over-flow hose?

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-23-10, 04:25 PM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Country
Posts: 26
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sump pit over-flow hose?

Please let me know if my idea is worth trying. I had a sump pump's switch-operated float get stuck against the sump wall a few years back and my basement got wet. Nothing huge, but the carpet and baseboards had to be ripped out. During rain storms, my weepers really work hard and flow heavily into my sump pit because I have a hill to the west of my house and water flows towards that side. I have replaced the old pump with a Flotec 1/2hp and installed a sump-buddy water operated back-up pump. But, I'm still not satisfied that I'm completely water-proof.

I'd like to have a third back-up by extending the sump wall about six inches above the basement floor. I'd cut a hole in the side of the wall where a hose could be fitted and the hose could be run to a floor drain in the laundry room. This would be a last resort if the water-powered pump could not keep up with the flow. I have attached an image of my current setup.

 
  #2  
Old 02-23-10, 06:06 PM
P
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Southeast Wisconsin
Posts: 580
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I guess that would work. The trick might be getting a good seal between your pit and the extension. if you would install a vertical master type switch in place of your current float you might have less chance of the switch hanging up.


http://www.sjerhombus.com/products/p...nfo.asp?id=370
 
  #3  
Old 02-24-10, 06:01 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: northern ohio
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
suggestions

I would eliminate the tether type float switch and go with Pumpguy's suggestion of a Vertical Master Switch. Much more reliable and easier to switch out if/when it goes bad. From personal experience, I would also upgrade to a Zoeller, Hydromatic, or Liberty pump and maybe throw the Flotec on the shelf as an emergency back up. The "big box" brands do not have a very good history in my active pit. I am not sure how well your plan would work, may be difficult to get a great seal.
 
  #4  
Old 02-24-10, 06:19 AM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Country
Posts: 26
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Getting a good seal will be difficult. I will use pvc/abs cement and lots of good quality silicone. It won't be pretty, but it should do the job. Although the picture doesn't show much, the float valve has at least 2 inches of clearance in the pit and I have tied two wires around the drainage pipes to keep the pump from moving in the pit. I just bought the Flotec a couple of years ago. Has a 3 year warranty, so I'll probably replace it after the warranty expires. So far, it has worked really well and moves a lot of water very quickly. It drains the entire pit in under 15 seconds.
 
  #5  
Old 02-24-10, 06:24 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 24,460
Received 752 Votes on 691 Posts
The extension of your pit will would probably have to seal to the plastic pit since there can be passages under your tile that would let water seep out. There are many sealants that will work but old fashioned tar based products are pretty cheap and reliable. The plumbing for your two pumps would have to be re-done to bring them up above the rim of your extension.

Don't forget that if the water can rise to the level of your new riser & drain it will also probably be at that level behind your basement/foundation walls. That bit of pressure might make water seep out in other places in your basement.

----
One thing I don't like seeing is both your pumps connected to the same drain line right at the pit. I have seen a check valve fail allowing water to drain back into the pit. One pump can be pumping out while a failed check valve on the other lets the water flow right back in. The water just flows in a circle with little or none making it out of the house.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: