Septic tank and seepage pit help advice.

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  #41  
Old 05-24-12, 09:28 PM
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I don't think toilets are running. I can't hear anything and there isn't a steady flow of water going into the drywell.

I have to buy one of the filter brushes.

I also noticed that the drywell doesn't smell. IT does after a shower though. I figure thats because its getting a fresh dose of septic tank water.

ETA:

I also read on another site that people put urea ( a nitrogen based fertilizer ) in the tank to help feed the aerobic bacteria. I emailed Roebic and they yes it may help.

here is what they said:
Generally, the K-57 is all that is needed. However, some extra nitrogen source such as the urea can prove useful from time to time.

I also picked the brain of another company that sells an aerobic kit.

Here is what they said about adding Ad Ox:

however added the inexpensive oxidant called sodium per carbonate works well during the beginning phase’s of restoration. Sodium per carbonate is the main ingredient in Oxy Clean. It can also be purchased at The Dollar Store or Dollar General stores under the name Awesome Oxygen
 
  #42  
Old 05-24-12, 09:50 PM
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Without reading back, when did you have the septic emptied last?

You need to stop the solids from entering the pits. If you have the tee like mine there is nothing there to stop it. I had some flimsy hinged baffle on the underside of the pipe that did nothing. As soon as the scum layer gets think it just flows into the pit.

Scum layer is on the top of the septic. That will get thicker before the bottom sludge layer will.

The other thing is dumping large amounts of water at one time. Like doing laundry, showering, DW back to back. This stirs up the stuff in the tank and its just flowing to the pit.

You will never make headway if you dont do that first.

Also, and I am not sure without re reading, is when and if the tank was pumped the pits should have been pumped also. The pumper with pump back and forth in the pits to dislodge the material. Kind of like power washing it.

I managed to rake the bottom of mine. Working in a 4 ft hole to the lid I found that was only 1 ft x 2 ft opening. They wanted $150 to suck out the bottom. I passed for lack of $$$ at the time.

I really want it to work for you and am trying to help best I can.

Mike NJ
 
  #43  
Old 05-24-12, 10:23 PM
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I appreciate your input Mike

We had the septic tank & drywells pumped last fall. I was hesitant to do it again before starting this experiment. It took a few months for us to fill the septic tank up to the point where effluent was flowing to the dry well. There are concrete baffles at the inlet and outlet of the septic tank. I'm not sure of their size but they are solid.

I'm not sure if they "power washed" the drywells when it was pumped. I got home from work about the time they were packing up.

Drywell and septic tanks were installed ~ 1995 They are still in good shape structurally.

Do you think raking the bottom of the drywell helped? I thought about doing this even with water in them. When they pumped them last fall, there was a black coating on the bottom of the drywell. I can imagine that layer would certainly slow down water leaving the drywell. Since there is only about a 20" diameter hole in the top of the drywell maybe one of those garden weeder things with the 4 fingers sticking down would be better. Seems to me you could probably dig into the stone on the bottom about 4" or so.

When you say they wanted $150 to suck out the bottom. Are you referring to the sludge that is on the bottom? Or literally sucking up some of the stone to expose less clogged surface area?

The other thing I thought. If I had the drywells pumped, why couldn't I pressure wash the inside of the drywell? Wouldn't that dislodge some of the scum also?
 
  #44  
Old 05-25-12, 01:04 AM
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The bottom on mine was a hard crust. Biomat...

The bottom of mine is not stone. Its sitting right on the dirt. Then they put stone around it. It really percs from the sides not the bottom.

They wanted $150 to suck the bottom of what he could reach in mine. He was worried about sucking dirt with rocks that might hurt his equiptment. I raked most of the bottom and broke it up. I only wanted him to suck it out.

Yes your can pressure wash. Thats good. Get every hole in the side you can. But you need someone to pump it out when done.

All and all I would not do nothing. Let the aeration do its thing. Give it time. Throw a bottle of cess flow in every few weeks and post back your results. Are you dipping the tank to see exact levels or are you just eyeing it.

Mike NJ
 
  #45  
Old 05-25-12, 05:34 AM
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I guess I have to learn patience.

I think I will hold off on pumping it then pressure washing it. Like I said it holding its own. Last fall it was really rainy. Both drywells were full at the time we had them pumped. So that indicates the 1st one was full and the excess was flowing into the second. Right now 1st drywell is keeping up with the input and 2nd drywell is just setting there with ~ 2' of water in it

I haven been checking levels. They are both holding steady. The 2nd drywell is not aerated though. If the first drywell shows improvement, I will aerate the 2nd

Again thanks for your input Mike. I never would have thought about attempting this. If it doesn't work, it was worth the gamble.

Just curious, How much water should actually be in the drywells? If the system was working a peak performance, would they be empty?
 
  #46  
Old 05-25-12, 11:04 AM
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Another quick update. I opened the septic tank today. The baffles at the outlet of the tank seem to be keeping solids from leaving the tank. It was just water going out. There was quite a bit of crusty looking stuff built up around on & around the baffles though.

I slightly reduced the air pressure to the aerator in the Drywell. Since the turbulence was a little less. I could see what looked to be small pieces of toilet paper churning around in there. Maybe it was just some sort of scum/film build up that has been knocked loose by the aerator. I guess that could be good or bad. Maybe it will clog the drywell holes more, or maybe stuff that was lodged in the tank holes has loosen up.

ETA: The bottom of my tank is soil not stone like I originally thought.
 
  #47  
Old 05-25-12, 12:29 PM
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I think there should always be a level of water in the tank to some extent. I dont think they are made to drain from the bottom. The level should be in line with the first set of holes in the side of the pit.

Also level depens on your normal perc rate of normal working dirt.

So say 200 gallons in, then how long will it take that 200 gallons to perc in the ground? Overnight say 100 gallons absorbs, then you may be left with 100 gallons in there. But by morning you shower, laundry, etc and dump another 100 gallons in there.

So you see its better to space things apart. Shower in morning, dishwasher afternoon, laundry at night...etc.

I would leave it bubbling on full IMO.

Mike NJ
 
  #48  
Old 05-25-12, 01:04 PM
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Thanks Mike. Its kind of funny though, ITs almost like the level doesn't vary. With the exception of last fall, it always has ~30" in it. Of course I have only been watching the level since last fall. Out of sight out of mind I guess . I'll run the aerator for a couple of more weeks and check it then. I think I may put another gal of Cessflo in it to help things along. Thanks again
 
  #49  
Old 07-04-12, 06:57 PM
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OK gents. If you read through this post this is where I am at.

I believe I last posted my seepage pit level 2/20/12. I have been checking levels bi weekly ( but not all the time) and have come to a point where the level has risen some but is constant and has not deviated at all. Everytime I check.

The level in my pit stays a constant 1 ft 3". I was a bit concerned at first but I belive that level may be the first course of holes in the sides of my pit. I can assume I am not perking well from the bottom, but that is just dirt and no gravel. The gravel is around the perimeter.

Here are current pics. I added a hole to the clean out cap for back pressure reasons on the pump. ( I am assuming its better ) I also need to darken my footage marker on my stick.



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  #50  
Old 07-09-12, 10:33 AM
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After a septic tank is pumped, pumping it again in short order accomplishes nothing (other than to buy time if you have a problem with the seepage pit or leach field).

In normal operation the septic tank remains about 85% full which is usually with the liquid level a little less than a foot below the top. If the septic tank has a leak (to the surrounding soil) then it becomes an environmental/ecological issue but it will still function properly.

If the seepage pit/leach field does not perk due to impregnation by septic tank sludge or scum or biomat, then it must be rejuvenated using chemicals or be decommissioned with a new pit/field dug next to it. A new pit/field can be put in the same place as the old one if the impregnated soil and sand is removed and carted off with new brought in.

When the soil is not porous enough for fast enough perking then sometimes a second pit is dug.

If water remains in the seepage pit for a long time with no one using water back in the house, chance are you have a problem there. Also it s possible for the water table to be high, above the bottom of the pit, for that time of year and that amount of rainfall. If the seepage pit fills up then you must do something about it.
 
  #51  
Old 07-13-12, 10:50 PM
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Seepage pit not functioning

What a GREAT thread ... very insightful. I'm sure that I have a MAJOR biomat buildup issue. We have been back into the house for three weeks and I'm concerned I'm about to face a major issue, again. Following is my story, and some questions:

I have a two chamber septic tank with a connected seepage pit 6' round and 25' deep. In Jan of this year I had a bad sewage backup into our house and I had just pumped the septic tank 3 months earlier.

I had all three pumped while we were out of the house, again. We were out of the house for 4 1/2 months so there wasn't much usage other than the workers and we would occasionally visit. About a month before we moved back in I added an aeration system into tank number two (I bought a full system ... wish I had found this forum first and saved myself a lot of money!). When we moved in both tanks were already full (as they should always be with normal usage) and my seepage pit was 11' from the top (or 14' full).

As we started going into "normal household mode" (wife and I, 3 adult children) the pit was holding pretty stable at 9-11' depending on the days use (measurements from the top). Since it wasn't going down we have tried conserving, but tonight I measured and it's at 7'. I would have expected better results from the aerator by now? Any thoughts?

I have a few questions:
- Shouldn't the seepage pit be draining down further?
- What is the "normal amount" of liquid that should be in a seepage pit at all times? I realize there's many factors that influence that including the local water table (which I can't find anywhere on the web what mine is), but it seems like holding a constant 15' plus of liquid is excessive?
- The company I bought the aerator from recommended putting it into the second pit ... but after reading this thread, I'm thinking I should put it directly in the seepage pit. Thoughts?
- Also, since I bought a fairly large system, should I consider putting a splitter into the hose line and run one hose to the pit and keep the one in the second tank ... would that be better?

Again, thanks for all the great information.
 
  #52  
Old 07-14-12, 07:33 AM
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Shouldn't the seepage pit be draining down further


It depends on your perc rate when system was new, and the amount of bio mat in there now. Its a long process if the system is older.

What is the "normal amount" of liquid that should be in a seepage pit at all times? I realize there's many factors that influence that including the local water table (which I can't find anywhere on the web what mine is), but it seems like holding a constant 15' plus of liquid is excessive?
What is the "normal amount" of liquid that should be in a seepage pit at all times? I realize there's many factors that influence that including the local water table (which I can't find anywhere on the web what mine is), but it seems like holding a constant 15' plus of liquid is excessive?
Same as my first comment.

The company I bought the aerator from recommended putting it into the second pit ... but after reading this thread, I'm thinking I should put it directly in the seepage pit. Thoughts?


Dont know what aerator you have, but yes put it in seepage pit IMO. If you read this thread you will know that that is the preferred area. But you have a two chamber system? The solids catch in the first chamber? The second chamber is more of an effluent chamber? It may be benificial for you to aerate both.

You don't want to churn up solids in the main tank IMO. What you want is a filter for the exit from main tank to pit. I think this was described in this thread somewhere.

Also, since I bought a fairly large system, should I consider putting a splitter into the hose line and run one hose to the pit and keep the one in the second tank ... would that be better?
Yes but describe your system better. You don't want to send solids to the pit. A system that is too big may not be beneficial. You want smaller bubbles and not a giant volcano of turbulence IMO.

My system is still a test in progress and I feel I am working well.

Hope this helps.









 
  #53  
Old 07-20-12, 08:27 PM
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I bit of an update. About the time of my last post ~ May 25 I decide to add 2 bleeder valves to my air lines. I dropped the pressure so there wasn't as much churning going on in the tank. I basically walked away for a couple of weeks and didn't look at it. When I checked it again the level had dropped about 8". It has held there through June. Sometime in early July, just for giggles, I closed off the bleeder valves so the drywell went back to full churning. again I forgot about is until today. I went out and looked at the tank tonight. It is back up to the pipe that goes to the second tank. We have had a very dry summer here so the water table isn't an issue. Maybe I'm wrong but I can't help thinking that the churning isn't beneficial in aiding bacteria digesting biomat. I opened up the bleeder valves again to slow churning and will update in a couple of weeks
 
  #54  
Old 07-20-12, 10:39 PM
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Tim I agree, and I may have posted in this post or another that too much churning, or bubbles are not beneficial. Its a small slow bubble that is beneficial in septics, IMO, as more oxygen is produced in the tank. A violent burst that only disturbs the top layer, and statistics show do not help.

This is why I went with the smaller bubbler and pump.

Let us know the outcome. This is great info.,
 
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Old 07-21-12, 08:10 PM
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Lawros, can you share where you got your bubbler? I want to split my line and drop a bubbler into my seepage pit.

To answer your last questions, I have two tanks (first for solids, second flows over for non-solids) then into the seepage pit).

Since my last post I went to the dollar store and bought some of that oxy stuff and dumped a couple of the small containers directly into the seepage pit a week ago and two more today.

The seepage pit level has remained consistent at around 8' from the surface (or 17' feet from from the bottom).

We're doing all the normal stuff in the house (bathroom, showers, laundry) and trying to conserve. One of the local pumpers says I need a new pit, but digging a 25' hole 20' away from this one doesn't make a lot of sense to me, besides the $10K he says it'll cost!

I'm hoping that over time it will continue to break down the biomat and eventually go down further. My plan is to start aerating the second tank and seepage pit and add a couple of those oxy containers in once a week.

That stuff is so cheap, I'm wondering if I should dump more in? Any thoughts?
 
  #56  
Old 07-21-12, 08:31 PM
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oxy containers in once a week.

That stuff is so cheap, I'm wondering if I should dump more in? Any thoughts?
Not sure what you are talking about. What are the ingrediants?

The hakko 25 is what I use. You can split the hakko 40 IMO if doing two tanks.

Let me know.






 
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Old 07-21-12, 11:53 PM
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It's 16 oz's called awesome oxygen. Chlorine free. Ingredients says contains sodium percarbonate and sodium carbonate.

Is this the wrong stuff?
 
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Old 07-22-12, 07:45 AM
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Here are the ingrediants of the aid ox.


http://search.yahoo.com/r/_ylt=A0oG7...pecs/aidox.pdf

INGREDIENTS CAS#
Sodium Percarbonate 15630-89-4
Sodium Carbonate 497-19-8
Sodium Metasilicate 6834-92-0

I supposed the stuff you bought could be used. Not sure though. I am not a chemist
 
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Old 07-31-12, 03:53 PM
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Well, I've decided to throw in the towel with this experiment. Aerator has been running since June 1. I saw some progress for a while. This past week we had a bit of rain and now the dry wells are full. If the dry well have to be dug up I want to do it so I can get some grass started before winter. Good luck to anyone trying this experiment.
 
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Old 07-31-12, 03:59 PM
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Just for the record, I bought the 9" deffuser because I have read the position of the stick combined with water vs air pressure tend to make the air sticks clog on the side that is deeper in the water. I didn't want to have to pull the air stick every couple of weeks for cleaning. Also because I have 2 dry wells I figured the larger pump could have 2 of the 9" diffusers one in each tank.
 
  #61  
Old 07-31-12, 05:39 PM
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Well, I've decided to throw in the towel with this experiment. Aerator has been running since June 1.


Boy that was not long.... but at least you tried. I pull my air stick out of the pit every once in a while and wipe it down. Mine does lay on the bottom but I may pull it up some so it stands vertical.

I am still holding my own and level does not move from 1 ft 3".
 
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Old 07-31-12, 05:53 PM
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Hi Mike, The big problem that I'm up against is winter. If I dig for new dry wells and there is no lawn grown back I will have a mess in the back yard when it snows. The dry wells are full again getting ready to bubble to the surface. We did have rain over the weekend which may have been partially responsible for the high water level. I wish I could go a little longer but I'm running out of time.
 
  #63  
Old 11-27-12, 12:08 PM
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Keep your fingers crossed

Lawrosa - I wanted to thank you for your copious and detailed notes and records on your project. While my situation is almost certainly more severe, I'm encouraged enough to give the aeration a shot. I've ordered a pond kit with pump, hose and diffuser after much research and a long conversation with the pump distributor. One interesting thing that he brought up was the issue/debate of small bubbles (and small pumps) vs. bigger bubbles (and bigger pumps). He was very knowledgeable and made a good case for why larger bubbles and the movement they create are more desirable in a seepage pit where there are, theoretically, no solids to stir up. He also pointed out that the small bubble diffusers work the pumps much harder and given the depth of my pit (14 feet) I went with a medium bubble diffuser. Hope to have it in next week and begin documenting my success. Thanks again for your contributions here.

Cheers.
 
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Old 11-27-12, 12:35 PM
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Has anyone considered terra lifting?

I just realized that I don't think anyone mentioned terra lifting in this thread. Pretty cool process and a fraction the cost of a new field. Seems it would complement the aeration very well. Unfortunately for me, I have a very deep seepage pit and of the two guys in NJ who do it, one refuses because of the risk of collapsing the pit and the other is very nervous about it. Anyone with septic should certainly consider it though.

Cheers,
 
  #65  
Old 11-27-12, 01:03 PM
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Very interesting sickofs__t. I am curious to what unit you have purchased and what diffuser was recommend?

My pump has been going none stop with no issues.
 
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Old 11-27-12, 01:52 PM
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I was told terra lift is useless. This was by a septc guy that has it and will not offer it anymore....
 
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Old 12-08-12, 07:57 PM
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The pond kit I ended up using is this one

2000 Gallon Pond Kit - Aeration Kits

I installed it about 4 days ago. It does create a noticeable amount of turbulence on the surface of the seepage pit but I now appear to be percing a bit as the water level is holding steady at about halfway down the 15 foot deep pit. I put in one gallon of cess flow when I first installed the aerator and another two gallons today. I must say that it changed the color of the water when I added it today from a very dark, blackish color to a muddy brown color. My documentation is somewhat lacking but I'll try to provide updates as to my progress/success. If this works (my system is original, house built in '69) I'll be pumped. Thanks again for the guidance and experience.
 
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Old 12-08-12, 08:57 PM
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Yes sickofs if you see from here

http://i1225.photobucket.com/albums/...Picture032.jpg

To here

http://i1225.photobucket.com/albums/...Picture036.jpg

You see the muddy brown as you describe.

I will dip my tank next week to show progress.

I have been at the 15" mark most of the year. No lower, no higher. I feel I should be lower. I am still learning but have not messed with it because I am staying lower then the inlet.
 
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Old 12-09-12, 07:49 AM
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Lawrosa,

That's interesting what you say about the terra lift. Given that there are only a couple of guys in NJ who do it, I wonder if we're talking to/about the same guy? Anyway, having watched the youtube videos demonstrating it in action, I would think it would work for at least some period of time. I do understand the fear of collapsing a block pit like mine and I'm a bit wary myself. The point is moot given that I can't get anyone to do it but I'm interested in it academically now. Let you know about the aeration later today. Keep your fingers crossed!
 
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Old 12-30-12, 11:31 AM
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So to revisit this thread I been thinking.... This because of a comment here and a local walk through my bulk warehouse store.


When I initially had my issue I was told to use a product called aid ox.

Here is what is in it. Cost about $70 for a gallon jug of powder.

Here are the ingredients of the aid ox. 9 lbs


http://www.herchem.com/specs/aidox.pdf

INGREDIENTS CAS#
Sodium Percarbonate 15630-89-4
Sodium Carbonate 497-19-8
Sodium Metasilicate 6834-92-0


So upon my venture I found this for $14 bucks. 11 lbs.

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You see the ingredients are the same, although it does not state the amounts of each. Same stuff and #'s.

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With that said i dipped my seepage pit. I have been holding fine since starting this whole experiment with the aeration at 15" - 18". Does not deviate from here and has not changed. This seems like my hold your own level.

just too close to the 2ft mark for me.

So I dumped this 11 lbs in the pit today. I will check it in about three days and post back. See the level? 18"

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And here is what got me into the whole thing. And upon reading this I feel confident that this may accelerate my restoration process.

I am not affiliated with this site. Just posting for reference.

Septic Aeration 101 Aerator FAQ










 
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Old 12-31-12, 08:50 AM
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Septic tank and seepage pit help advice.

St. Theresa, Pooper,

We have just restored our Septic Leach field that was TOTALLY backed up. Our septic tank had filled up, toilets backed up, etc. We had the tank pumped out to no avail. The Septic Guys said it would cost $5,000 to dig up & replace our leach field, said there was nothing else that could be done.

We researched the subject and found out about sodium Percarbonate ( Oxy-Septic ). We found Sodium Percarbonate mixed with water to be a MIRACLE when added to our septic field. The water immediately began to bubble violently - the reaction was awesome ! We followed directions and added 36 lbs over 4 days mixed with water, - directions at oxyseptic.com.
http://www.oxyseptic.com/how-it-works/

That did the trick, our septic field then started working like new. What is Sodium Percarbonate?
Oxygen Bleach an Introduction - Home Ec 101

Then we added the SepticAir Aid aeration bubbler here:
Septic Aeration Review Comparison

and then we added septic tank risers to make it fast & easy to maintain & service our tank.
Tuf-Tite Septic Tank Risers and Lids, Septic Tank Cover, Septic Tank Risers


Happiness is a properly running septic tank that is easy to maintain !

Grizz
 
  #72  
Old 12-31-12, 10:15 AM
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Here is a old thread I closed but is related just for reference.

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/we...bleaching.html
 
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Old 12-31-12, 01:25 PM
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Lawrosa,

You are correct, sodium percarbonate is the main & active ingredient in Oxyclean. $14 for 11 lbs is a great price. In my research of products, Oxyclean is among the top brands for the most Sodium Percarbonate per lb:
Stain Solver 90%
Oxy-Boost 90%
Shout Oxy Powder 75%
Oxy-Clean 50%


Also while on this subject, I found this discussion fascinating:
"While septic aeration alone has long been proven to restore failed septic system experience has shown a simple, easy to obtain, and safe additive known as Sodium Percarbonate is extremely effective in speeding up the restore time of failing systems no matter what type of septic system you are restoring."
Rest of the discussion here:
Septic Aeration 101 Aerator FAQ
They won't recommend any product names, and they won't sell it, so I had to search the net for sources of Sodium Percarbonate. I could not find our distribution box, so I rigged up a temporary 4 inch pipe leading up from the Septic Tank exit. I used this pipe to pour a mixture of water & Sodium Percarbonate into the leach field. The reaction from the 1st application was dramatic. Huge brown bubbles started boiling up into the 4 inch pipe. It was scary & I backed away quickly as it looked like water would come shooting out of the pipe into my face! The bubbling continued on each application, just not as much. After 4 days water was pouring easily into the drain field. I feel very lucky to have discovered Oxy products for the drain field.

Grizz
 
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Old 12-31-12, 01:32 PM
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You are correct, sodium percarbonate is the main & active ingredient in Oxyclean. $14 for 11 lbs is a great price. In my research of products, Oxyclean is among the top brands for the most Sodium Percarbonate per lb:
Stain Solver 90%
Oxy-Boost 90%
Shout Oxy Powder 75%
Oxy-Clean 50%


I am curious where did you find the % of the S/percarb in these products? So If you say Oxy clean only has 50% how is the highest % per lb?

Do you mean % per $ amount spent??

Also see post #12. Shows the brown bubbles you where reffering to.
 
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Old 01-02-13, 12:23 AM
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Oxyclean is among the top brands for the most Sodium Percarbonate per lb:
Stain Solver 90%
Oxy-Boost 90%
Shout Oxy Powder 75%
Oxy-Clean 50%





I am curious where did you find the % of the S/percarb in these products? So If you say Oxy clean only has 50% how is the highest % per lb?

Do you mean % per $ amount spent??

Also see post #12. Shows the brown bubbles you where reffering to.


Mike,
I spent literally weeks searching the internet for products that contained Sodium Percarbonate, and various models of Septic Aerators. All I had to go on was this very sketchy description.

The % of Sodium Percarbonate is the % per lb of product. I wanted to get something with the highest amount of Percarbonate and lowest amount of fillers. The % per lb was on one of my thousands of internet searches. I finally decided to use Oxy-Septic on my Leach field because they provided detailed instructions on how to apply their product, and I decided to use the less expensive Oxy-Boost in my Septic Tank. The Technician I talked to at SepticAirAid suggested that I add 5 to 10 lbs of Sodium Percobonate mixed thoroughly in water once a month to the septic tank for the first few months to help speed the rejuvenation of the septic field. He added, "The people that are able to get that mixture into their drain field have the best results, if not adding it to your tank helps also,just not as well as getting it into your drain field."

While I was at all of this work on my Septic Tank, I also added a lint filter to our washing machine. I've cleaned out the filter once already, and it was surprising how much lint was caught that used to go into my septic tank. I'll be cleaning the lint filter once a month.

I should also mention using my Pressure Washer to jet out the pipe exiting the Septic Tank, using the Clog Hog. My pressure washer is 2,200 PSI and the Clog Hog pulls itself through the pipe, cleaning and blasting away anything in its path. It pulled itself all the way down to the distribution box and some surprising things came flying out including old prophylactics ! ! Unfortunately this did nothing to restore the leach field as water would still not leave the septic tank. At least I found out that the distribution box was 12 feet away from the tank. My next project for spring is to add a riser to the distribution box. I would like to blast out the leach field pipes with my high pressure washer. This house was built in 1995, so the septic system is 17 years old.

One more thing I did was to buy a Sump Pump from Lowes ($85) to pump the tank to a hose that goes out to the woods. It will pump the tank dry in about 2 hours. I will never waste another $265 to have my tank pumped out again. Since my tank is so easy to work on now with risers added, who needs the expensive pump truck?

My tank is running perfectly again this week with the water level right at the exit pipe. It takes only seconds to lift the cover on my septic tank riser to inspect the water level.

Oh yes, and one last thing while I'm on the subject. The wife may have been a big problem here. She was using a LOT of toilet paper every time she used the facilities. So I laid down the law - all such toilet paper goes into the trash, not flushed down into the septic tank. She was using up a roll of paper every few days and I think this may have been a major reason for my septic problems.

PS) Mike, I love all the photos you are sharing with everyone. Excellent.

That's all I have for now,
Grizz
 

Last edited by lawrosa; 01-02-13 at 06:18 AM.
  #76  
Old 01-02-13, 06:42 AM
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I talked to at SepticAirAid suggested that I add 5 to 10 lbs of Sodium Percobonate

What did they say on where to get it? Is it the products you listed? I know of all the products you listed but again the stuff I found at the mega store is the least expensive per pound.

They say this and I may give them a call myself today.


What is The Best Way to Apply Sodium Percarbonate and Where Can I Purchase It?

Call us at xxx-xxx-xxxx we would be glad to answer your questions.
One more thing I did was to buy a Sump Pump from Lowes ($85) to pump the tank to a hose that goes out to the woods.


This is illegal and a health hazard. You will incur severe penalty's/fines if caught. I cannot condone that at all. I have to think about it but I may remove that from your post.

Your links are OK since I myself researched all of those products. Yes jetting the latterales is good but you need a pump truck to get out the biomat when you pull it back to the D box.

I reccomend the lint filter if anyone has their washer to the sepic.

Additionally a filter should be put in the exit baffle to keep solids from leaving the septic. I think I show that in one of my posts.

I have one of these in my tee.

Gravity Filters






 
  #77  
Old 01-02-13, 07:43 AM
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What did they say on where to get it? Is it the products you listed? I know of all the products you listed but again the stuff I found at the mega store is the least expensive per pound.
They say this and I may give them a call myself today.
Mike,
SepticAirAid Tech would not make a product recommendation to me. They leave it up to the customer to buy the Sodium Percarbonate of their choice. The products I chose to use were based on my own research on the internet for max % of the active ingredient. To each their own choice. The major point here is that Sodium Percarbonate did a miracle for my own septic leach field. It probably doesn't matter which brand we use, as long as it contains a lot of Sodium Percarbonate. We can also buy pure Sodium Percarbonate from chemical companies, but I found that option to be far more expensive.

One more thing:
Old too soon & Schmart too late. Using the right search words in Google makes ALL THE DIFFERENCE. Best prices for air bubblers can be found with this search phrase:
"Fine Bubble Diffuser"
This search returns some excellent looking products for far less than $100. So this makes it easy to shop around for the best prices for septic air bubblers.

Grizz








 

Last edited by Grizz1943; 01-02-13 at 09:03 AM.
  #78  
Old 01-02-13, 10:02 AM
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Google makes ALL THE DIFFERENCE. Best prices for air bubblers can be found with this search phrase:
"Fine Bubble Diffuser"



Yeah the trouble with my diffuser is I need to get it down a 2" pipe as you see in my pics.

So you got my curiosity up and did some researh. here is what I found.

Sodium percarbonate is Hydrogen peroxide in a granulated form from what I read here.

Using Sodium Percarbonate: a dry granulated form of hydrogen peroxide

So for faster treatment it may be beneficial to use 35% hydrogen peroxide. So I just read here.

Hydrogen Peroxide: practical, environmentally friendly & anti-bacterial

Concentrations of hydrogen peroxide

Now I said where the heck am I going to get this....???? Ding.... I have a pool, and I floated this idea around in my head for sanitizing instead of chlorine.

I remmember my local pool store sells s few products and this is one of them.

Aqua Silk Chlorine-Free Shock Oxidizer | Chlorine Alternatives | Leslie's Swimming Pool Supplies, the world leader in residential and commercial pool supplies.

here is the manufacturer.

Aqua Silk

I did a live chat with them to find the concentration. Its not in the MSDS sheets so I asked her to look at the label... 27%. I guess next time I go to the pool store I will verify.


Now my million $ question. What is better?

Is 11 lbs of OXY clean for $14 better? Or 1 gallon of 27% peroxide for $14 better?

Ahh the research continues.
 
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Old 01-02-13, 10:36 AM
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Now my million $ question. What is better?
Is 11 lbs of OXY clean for $14 better? Or 1 gallon of 27% peroxide for $14 better?
Ahh the research continues.

Mike,
Please keep us informed of your research. My case is closed. I just checked my tank again this morning, and the septic tank water level is perfect. . . right at the exit pipe. The total cost of my project was $2,000 including everything. I may have done this for a lot less $$$ but I was desperate and the wife was getting very unhappy. It was certainly far less expensive than letting the Septic Guys dig up my back yard ($5,000 + ). I feel very lucky to have found the right answers even if it cost me more. I was the pioneer and pioneers usually pay more. I did get a lot for my money. Septic tank risers, a quality aeration bubbler, chemicals that worked the 1st time, an effluent filter, washing machine lint filter, and most important, a septic system that is easy to manage. MAINLY peace of mind & a happy wife. Misery is a failing septic tank.

Hopefully the next person suffering a backed up septic field will find this message thread and go directly to the solution with minimal expense and suffering.

Unless anyone has any questions, I am all done, my project is closed.

Grizz
 

Last edited by Grizz1943; 01-02-13 at 01:20 PM.
  #80  
Old 01-04-13, 10:48 AM
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I spent some more money on my septic system to wrap this up. I added a high water alarm, and safety lids to prevent snooping children from falling into the tank.
Approximate total cost of this project: $2,400


This is a lot better than $5,000+ for digging up my leach field ! ! And I have a septic system that is now super easy to manage with major improvements. (All links removed at administrators request ) All prices listed are approximate. Shopping the internet may find better prices, everything in the following list have multiple suppliers .


Septic Tank Risers
2- 24 x 12 risers @ $52 $104

2 - 24” Square Riser Riser Rings @ $59 $118
2 - Riser Ring installation anchor kits @ $18.50 $ 37
2- 24” Riser Lids @ $26 $ 52
2- Safety Pan Safety Lids @ $19.50 $ 39
2- Safety Pan Risers @ $24 $ 48
1- High water Alarm $130
1- Concrete Saw Rental $100
1- Washing Machine Lint filter $155
1- Quad Bubbler Aerator $895
1- 100' High Pressure Pipe Blaster $129
1- Small sump pump $ 89
4 inch pipes & elbow for pouring water+Oxy-Septic into leach field $ 50
1- Effluent Filter Assembly $50
Oxy-Septic 36 lbs for leach filed $165
Oxy-Boost 45 lbs for septic tank $117
Misc expenses $100

Best to all,
Grizz
 

Last edited by Grizz1943; 01-04-13 at 11:24 AM.
 

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