can one well supply two buildings?

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Old 11-12-11, 04:57 PM
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can one well supply two buildings?

I have a well that supplies my house and I just built a garage fairly close to the well so now I need water to the garage and I can easily tap into the line running from the pump to the house but how can I rewire the pump to recognize the house needing water or the garage needing water? thanks so much for any help

David Keith
 
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Old 11-12-11, 05:29 PM
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Best would be to tie your new line into the houses water line after the pressure switch and pressure tank. No re-wiring required.
 
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Old 11-12-11, 09:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Pilot Dane View Post
Best would be to tie your new line into the houses water line after the pressure switch and pressure tank. No re-wiring required.
This is the best way to do what you are wanting.

Connecting to the line before the switch and tank is way more work than is necessary.
 
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Old 11-13-11, 03:38 AM
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OK thanks I already figured that but then I would have to run a water line from the house all the way back past the well and into the garage about 150 feet I was just looking for a way to rewire the pump and avoid all the digging but thanks anyhow

David Keith
 
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Old 11-14-11, 07:41 AM
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As long as there is no check valve between the well head and pressure tank, you can just tee into the line at the well head and run another line the other direction. If there is a check valve above ground, just remove it.
 
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Old 11-14-11, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Valveguy View Post
If there is a check valve above ground, just remove it.

If there is a sniffer or a pressure switch in that check valve, he cant remove it. The system will not work correctly. If the pressure switch is there. it would have to be moved to the tank, and rewired.

Running a pipe to the shop from the tank is way more simpler.
 
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Old 11-15-11, 02:17 AM
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That is kinda what I want do get the water without all the extra digging.............I suppose I could run the pump line into the garage first then hook back into the house line and let the garage tank and switch take over for both but I would really like to hook the pump up like a 3 way switch so it will work from either building. Thanks so much

David Keith
 
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Old 11-15-11, 02:33 AM
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I do have one check valve before the pressure switch and tank in the basement if I took that out would it help any?
 
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Old 11-15-11, 07:06 AM
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As long as you have a bladder style tank and it is a plain check valve with no Schrader or pressure switch sticking out of it, removing the check valve is all you need to do. You don't need a 3 way switch or anything. Just remove the check valve so water can go from the tank back towards the well. Then you can just tee into the line anywhere and run it to the other building.
 
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Old 11-15-11, 04:49 PM
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Yes its a bladder tank and also just a regular check valve. Do you think I should put a check valve in the line between the tee and the pump so I don't loose the prime?
 
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Old 11-16-11, 07:18 AM
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If it is an above ground jet pump, you should have a check valve on the suction line or a foot valve at the bottom of the well. If if is a submersible, there must be a check valve right on the discharge of the pump, which is the only one you need.
 
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Old 11-17-11, 03:11 AM
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OK so its a submersible pump I dont know how deep or how big the pump is since we moved here 4 years ago. Should I assume there is a check valve on top of the pump or go ahead and stick another one on? My tee is about 5 feet from the well and I could probably easily put one there. Thanks again so much for all your help

David Keith
 
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Old 11-17-11, 06:02 AM
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Most submersible deep well pumps have a check valve built into the pump assembly.

Are you going to have a shower in your garage or will the new water line just supply a wash down sink or garden hose for washing cars? The reason I ask is that tying into the water line between the pump and pressure tank & switch may provide a less "smooth" supply of water than if you tie in after the pressure tank.

When drawing water before the pressure tank, when the pump is off the flow of water is backwards from the pressure tank to your garage. When the pump kicks on the flow of water momentarily stops as it reverses direction to flow from the pump to the garage & pressure tank. It's no big deal if you just have a wash down sink or garden hose but can be annoying if you are trying to take a shower or doing anything that needs a smooth flow.
 
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Old 11-17-11, 07:26 AM
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You can assume the submersible pump will have a check valve on the discharge head. If it doesn’t you will have to pull it and put one there. Adding another up top will not help. And you would already know if you didn’t have a check valve on the pump as the water hammer and/or air in the lines would be a dead give away.

The direction of flow reversing after the pump starts might create a water hammer if you had a 50 GPM pump and flow rate. With the small amount of water used for a house or a shower you won’t even know it is happening. You will however notice that you have better and increasing pressure when the pump is running, and worse and decreasing pressure when the pump is off while water is coming from the tank. This variation in pressure is from the pump cycling on and off and not from the location of your tee in the line. There are ways to eliminate the cycling, which will give you “smoother” and more “constant pressure” in both locations.
 
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Old 11-17-11, 11:01 AM
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This is getting way too complicated. Why don't we make it simple? Just extend a line from the house. $50 for half a day is what ditch diggers cost around here if it doesn't have be very deep.
 
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Old 11-17-11, 11:41 AM
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He is in PA. As far as I know water lines need to be 3 1/2 ft down.

I would not waste my time.

I would get a water storage tank and set it up in the garage. Use 12v pump and set it up like a travel trailer. Fill it with a hose manually. add bleach to sanitize, etc...

Add trailer fixtures if your going that route.

We never did get what the use is for the garage and also how will you discharge the waste??? Are you hooking up to the sewer or septic?

Heck burry a small holding tank. But you will need it pumped.

How much money dod you want to spend????

If its just to have running water for washing cars. Buy 3/4 irrigation line and run it shallow underground from a outside hose bib from the main house. Then run it to a hose bib to the garage. Get 100 ft irrigation line for $18 bucks at the home store. Clamps, hosebib, fittings, etc should be around $50 bucks for all the material. Just need sweat labor.

Winterize it in the winter and your good to go.

just my two cents

Mike NJ
 
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Old 11-17-11, 03:59 PM
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I don't know what is so complicated about making sure there is not a check valve above ground and teeing into the line anywhere you want?
 
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Old 11-17-11, 09:35 PM
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i have to agree with valveguy. i've branched off the pump line to outside untreated water uses such as garages many times between the pump and tank. just make sure there are no check valves between the tee off to garage and the bladder tank and you will be fine. the tank doesnt care which way water leaves it. no need to over-engineer this one... its a garage, not oprah's guest house. jmo
 
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Old 11-18-11, 02:11 AM
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OK Great that is what I will do then remove the check valve and tee it at the garage no shower or septic tank for the garage just a floor drain to the outside. Mainly used for washing my truck and stuff like that will probably install a tankless hot water heater also. I probably will wait till spring now to lay the line Thank so much for everyones input

David Keith in Pa
 
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